Comité Europeu para a Proteção de Dados

EDPB News

2021

16 April 2021

The two EDPB opinions on the European Commission draft Implementing Decisions on the adequate protection of personal data in the United Kingdom have now been published on the EDPB website.

Opinion 14/2021 is based on the GDPR and assesses both general data protection aspects and government access to personal data transferred from the EEA for the purposes of law enforcement and national security included in the draft adequacy decision.

Opinion 15/2021 is based on the Law Enforcement Directive (LED) and analyses the draft adequacy decision in the light of Recommendations 01/2021 on the adequacy referential under the Law Enforcement Directive, as well as the relevant case law reflected in Recommendations 02/2020 on the European Essential Guarantees for surveillance measures. This is the first draft implementing decision on a third country’s adequacy under the LED ever presented by the European Commission and assessed by the EDPB.

14 April 2021

Opinions on draft UK adequacy decisions, Guidelines on the application of Article 65(1)(a) GDPR, Guidelines on the targeting of social media users and Statement on international agreements including transfers

During its plenary session, the EDPB adopted two Opinions on the draft UK adequacy decisions. Opinion 14/2021 is based on the GDPR and assesses both general data protection aspects and government access to personal data transferred from the EEA for the purposes of law enforcement and national security included in the draft adequacy decision. This assessment is based on the GDPR Adequacy Referential WP254. Opinion 15/2021 is based on the Law Enforcement Directive (LED) and analyses the draft adequacy decision in the light of Recommendations 01/2021 on the adequacy referential under the Law Enforcement Directive, as well as the relevant case law reflected in Recommendations 02/2020 on the European Essential Guarantees for surveillance measures. This is the first draft implementing decision on a third country’s adequacy under the LED ever presented by the European Commission and assessed by the EDPB. 

The EDPB notes that there are key areas of strong alignment between the EU and the UK data protection frameworks on certain core provisions such as: grounds for lawful and fair processing for legitimate purposes; purpose limitation; data quality and proportionality; data retention, security and confidentiality; transparency; special categories of data; and on automated decision making and profiling.

EDPB Chair, Andrea Jelinek said: "The UK data protection framework is largely based on the EU data protection framework. The UK Data Protection Act 2018 further specifies the application of the GDPR in UK law, in addition to transposing the LED, as well as granting powers and imposing duties on the national data protection supervisory authority, the ICO. Therefore, the EDPB recognises that the UK has mirrored, for the most part, the GDPR and LED in its data protection framework and when analysing its law and practice, the EDPB identified many aspects to be essentially equivalent. However, whilst laws can evolve, this alignment should be maintained. So we welcome the Commission's decision to limit the granted adequacy in time and the intention to closely monitor developments in the UK.”

The EDPB underlines that several items should be further assessed and/or closely monitored by the European Commission in its decision based on the GDPR, such as: 

  • Immigration Exemption and its consequences on restrictions on data subject rights;
  • The application of restrictions to onward transfers of EEA personal data transferred to the UK, on the basis of, for instance, future adequacy decisions adopted by the UK, international agreements concluded between the UK and third countries, or derogations.

Regarding access by public authorities for national security purposes to personal data transferred to the UK, the EDPB welcomes the establishment of the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (IPT) to address the challenges of redress in the area of national security, and the introduction of Judicial Commissioners in the Investigatory Powers Act (IPA) 2016 to ensure better oversight in that same field. The EDPB still identifies a number of points requiring further clarifications and/or monitoring: 

  • Bulk interceptions;
  • Independent assessment and oversight of the use of automated processing tools;
  • Safeguards provided under UK law when it comes to overseas disclosure, in particular in light of the application of national security exemptions.

The Board adopted Guidelines on the application of Article 65(1)(a) GDPR to delineate the main stages of the procedure and clarify the competence of the EDPB when adopting a legally binding decision on the basis of Article 65(1)(a) GDPR. The Guidelines also include a description of the applicable procedural safeguards and remedies. The guidelines will be subject to public consultation for a period of six weeks.

The EDPB adopted a final version of the Guidelines on the targeting of social media users following public consultation. The aim of the Guidelines is to clarify the roles and responsibilities of social media providers and targeted individuals. The final version integrates updated wording in order to address comments and feedback received during the public consultation.

The EDPB adopted a Statement on international agreements including transfers. The EDPB invites EU Member States to assess and, where necessary, review their international agreements that involve international transfers of personal data and which were concluded before 24 May 2016 (for those relevant to the GDPR) and 6 May 2016 (for those relevant to the LED) to align them, where necessary, with EU data protection law. 

The agenda of the forty-eighth plenary is available here.

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2021_03

12 April 2021

On April 13th, the EDPB will hold its 48th plenary session. The agenda for the 48th plenary is available here

 

 

06 April 2021

The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) and the European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS) adopted a joint opinion on the Proposals for a Digital Green Certificate. The Digital Green Certificate aims to facilitate the exercise of the right to free movement within the EU during the COVID-19 pandemic by establishing a common framework for the issuance, verification and acceptance of interoperable COVID-19 vaccination, testing and recovery certificates. 

With this Joint Opinion, the EDPB and the EDPS invite the co-legislators to ensure that the Digital Green Certificate is fully in line with EU personal data protection legislation. The data protection commissioners from all EU and European Economic Area countries highlight the need to mitigate the risks to fundamental rights of EU citizens and residents that may result from issuing the Digital Green Certificate, including its possible unintended secondary uses. The EDPB and the EDPS underline that the use of the Digital Green Certificate may not, in any way, result in direct or indirect discrimination of individuals, and must be fully in line with the fundamental principles of necessity, proportionality and effectiveness. Given the nature of the measures put forward by the Proposal, the EDPB and the EDPS consider that the introduction of the Digital Green Certificate should be accompanied by a comprehensive legal framework.

Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the EDPB, said: "A Digital Green Certificate that is accepted in all Member States can be a major step forward in re-starting travel across the EU. Any measure adopted at national or EU level that involves processing of personal data must respect the general principles of effectiveness, necessity and proportionality. Therefore, the EDPB and the EDPS recommend that any further use of the Digital Green Certificate by the Member States must have an appropriate legal basis in the Member States and all the necessary safeguards must be in place."

Wojciech Wiewiórowski, EDPS, said: It must be made clear that the Proposal does not allow for - and must not lead to - the creation of any sort of central database of personal data at EU level. In addition, it must be ensured that personal data is not processed any longer than what is strictly necessary and that access to and use of this data is not permitted once the pandemic has ended. I have always stressed that measures taken in the fight against COVID-19 are temporary and it is our duty to ensure that they are not here to stay after the crisis.”

In the current emergency situation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, the EDPB and the EDPS insist that the principles of effectiveness, necessity, proportionality and non-discrimination are upheld. The EDPB and the EDPS reiterate that, at the moment of writing, there seems to be little scientific evidence as to whether having received the COVID-19 vaccine (or having recovered from COVID-19) grants immunity, and, by extension, how long such immunity may last. But scientific evidence is growing daily.

Moreover, a number of factors are still unknown regarding the efficacy of the vaccination in reducing transmission. The Proposal should lay down clear and precise rules governing the scope and application of the Digital Green Certificate and impose appropriate safeguards. This will allow individuals, whose personal data is affected, to have sufficient guarantees that they will be protected, in an effective way, against the risk of potential discrimination.

The Proposal must expressly include that access to and subsequent use of individuals’ data by EU Member States once the pandemic has ended is not permitted. At the same time, the EDPB and the EDPS highlight that the application of the proposed Regulation must be strictly limited to the current COVID-19 crisis.

The Joint Opinion includes specific recommendations for further clarifications on the categories of data concerned by the Proposal, data storage, transparency obligations and identification of controllers and processors for the processing of personal data. 

Note to editors: Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2021_03

26 March 2021

On March 30th, the EDPB will hold its 47th plenary session. During the plenary, the EDPB will dicsuss the European Commission's proposal for Regulations on a Digital Green Certificate.

The agenda for the 47th plenary is available here

16 March 2021

Due to the high number of responses, the call for expression of interest is already closed.

On April 30, the EDPB is organising a remote stakeholder event on the topic "application of the GDPR to the processing of personal data for scientific research purposes”. Representatives from, among others, individual companies, sector organisations, NGOs, law firms and academia with an expertise on the field are welcome to express interest in attending.

In order to express your interest to participate in the event, please fill in this form.

Places will be allocated on a first come, first served basis, depending on availability. Nonetheless, the EDPB reserves the right to give precedence to specific stakeholders, in light of their relevance in the field. Selected participants will receive the confirmation of their registration in the event via e-mail.

Detailed information and the programme of the event will be available shortly.

As we would like to have a balanced and representative audience, participation will be limited to one participant per organisation.

When? 30 April 2021, from 10:00 - 16:00h CET

10 March 2021

The EDPB and EDPS adopted a joint opinion on the proposal for a Data Governance Act (DGA). The DGA aims to foster the availability of data by increasing trust in data intermediaries [1] and by strengthening data-sharing mechanisms across the EU. In particular, the DGA intends to promote the availability of public sector data for reuse, sharing of data among businesses and allowing personal data to be used with the help of a ‘personal data-sharing intermediary’. The DGA also seeks to enable the use of data for altruistic purposes.

The EDPB and the EDPS acknowledge the legitimate objective of the DGA to improve the conditions for data sharing in the internal market. At the same time, the protection of personal data is an essential and integral element for trust in the digital economy. With this joint opinion, the EDPB and the EDPS invite the co-legislators to ensure that the future DGA is fully in line with the EU personal data protection legislation, thus fostering trust in the digital economy and upholding the level of protection provided by EU law under the supervision of the EU Member States’ supervisory authorities.  

Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the EDPB, said:The EU's data protection legal framework does not stand in the way of developing the data economy. Quite the contrary, it enables it: trust in any kind of data sharing can only be achieved by respecting existing data protection legislation. The GDPR is the foundation on which the European data governance model must be built. That is why we underline the need to ensure consistency with the GDPR with regard to the competence of the supervisory authorities, the roles of the different actors involved, the legal basis for the processing of personal data, the necessary safeguards and the exercise of the rights of the data subjects.

Wojciech Wiewiórowski, EDPS, said:We understand the growing importance of data for the economy and society as outlined in the European Data Strategy. However, with “big data comes big responsibility”, therefore appropriate data protection safeguards must be put in place. The overarching framework for European data spaces should ensure that the data protection acquis is not affected.

The EDPB and EDPS consider that the EU legislator should ensure that the wording of the DGA clearly and unambiguously state that this act will not affect the level of protection of individuals’ personal data, nor will any rights and obligations set out in the data protection legislation be altered.  

Concerning the reuse of personal data held by public sector bodies, the EDPB and EDPS recommend aligning the DGA with the existing rules on the protection of personal data laid down in the GDPR and with the Open Data Directive. Furthermore, it should be clarified that the reuse of personal data held by public sector bodies may only be allowed if it is grounded in EU or Member State law. Such laws should include a list of clear compatible purposes for which further processing may be lawfully authorised or constitutes a necessary and proportionate measure in a democratic society to safeguard the objectives referred to in Article 23 of the GDPR. 

On data sharing service providers, the joint opinion highlights the need to ensure prior information and controls for individuals, taking into account the principles of data protection by design and by default, transparency and purpose limitation.  Furthermore, the modalities upon which such service providers would effectively assist individuals in exercising their rights as data subjects should be clarified. 

As for data altruism, the EDPB and the EDPS recommend that the DGA should better define the purposes of general interest of such “data altruism”. Data altruism should be organised in such a way that it allows individuals to easily give, but also, withdraw their consent. 

In light of the possible risks for data subjects when their personal data might be processed by data sharing service providers or data altruism organisations, the EDPB and EDPS consider that the declaratory registration regimes for these entities, as laid down in the DGA, do not provide for a sufficiently stringent vetting procedure applicable to such services. Therefore, the EDPB and EDPS recommend exploring alternative procedures that foresee a more systematic inclusion of accountability tools, in particular the adherence to a code of conduct or certification mechanism.

The joint opinion also includes recommendations on the designation of the supervisory authorities as main competent authorities for the control of the compliance with the DGA provisions, in consultation with other relevant sectorial authorities.

______________________________________
[1] See Explanatory Memorandum of the Proposal, page 1

Note to editors:  Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2021_02

10 March 2021

O CEPD adota o programa de trabalho 2021-2022, a Declaração sobre o Regulamento Privacidade Eletrónica, Diretrizes sobre assistentes vocais virtuais, bem como Diretrizes sobre veículos conectados e debruça-se sobre a adequação do nível de proteção dos dados no Reino Unido

Bruxelas, 10 de março - Durante a sua 46.ª sessão plenária, o CEPD adotou uma vasta gama de documentos e debateu os projetos de decisões relativas à adequação do nível de proteção dos dados no Reino Unido apresentados pela Comissão Europeia.

Em conformidade com o artigo 29.° do Regulamento Interno do CEPD, o Comité adotou o seu programa de trabalho para dois anos respeitante ao período de 2021-2022. O programa de trabalho segue as prioridades estabelecidas na Estratégia do CEPD para o período 2021-2023 e porá em prática os objetivos estratégicos do Comité.

O CEPD adotou uma declaração sobre o projeto de Regulamento Privacidade Eletrónica. Na sua declaração, o CEPD congratula-se com o acordo sobre o mandato de negociação conferido pelo Conselho, que constitui um passo positivo na finalização do Regulamento Privacidade Eletrónica. O CEPD recorda que as autoridades nacionais responsáveis pela aplicação do RGPD devem ser incumbidas da supervisão das disposições em matéria de privacidade do futuro Regulamento Privacidade Eletrónica, a fim de assegurar uma interpretação e aplicação harmonizadas do Regulamento Privacidade Eletrónica em toda a UE e garantir condições de concorrência equitativas no mercado único digital.

A presidente do CEPD, Andrea Jelinek, afirmou: «O Regulamento Privacidade Eletrónica não pode - em caso algum - reduzir o nível de proteção proporcionado pela atual Diretiva Privacidade Eletrónica e deve complementar o RGPD, proporcionando garantias adicionais sólidas de confidencialidade e proteção de todos os tipos de comunicações eletrónicas.»

O CEPD adotou Diretrizes sobre assistentes vocais virtuais. As referidas diretrizes visam identificar alguns dos desafios de conformidade mais importantes ligados aos assistentes vocais virtuais, assim como formular recomendações às partes interessadas sobre a forma de os resolver. As diretrizes estarão disponíveis para consulta pública durante um período de seis semanas.

O CEPD adotou a versão final das Diretrizes sobre veículos conectados na sequência de uma consulta pública. As referidas diretrizes centram-se no tratamento de dados pessoais no contexto da utilização não profissional de veículos conectados por parte dos titulares de dados. A versão final integra a redação atualizada e outros esclarecimentos, a fim de dar resposta às observações e reações recebidas durante a consulta pública.

O Comité debateu os projetos de decisões relativas à adequação do nível de proteção dos dados no Reino Unido, apresentados pela Comissão Europeia. O CEPD procederá a uma revisão aprofundada desses projetos de decisão, tendo em conta a importância de garantir a continuidade e um elevado nível de proteção das transferências de dados a partir da UE.

Por último, o CEPD adotou um parecer conjunto do CEPD e da Autoridade Europeia para a Proteção de Dados (AEPD) sobre o Regulamento Governação de Dados. Será publicado ainda hoje um comunicado de imprensa dedicado a este tema.

Nota aos editores:
todos os documentos adotados durante a sessão plenária do CEPD serão objeto das verificações jurídicas, linguísticas e de formatação necessárias, após o que serão publicados no sítio web do CEPD.

EDPB_Press Release_2021_02

03 February 2021

CEPD adota recomendações sobre o artigo 36.º da Diretiva sobre a Proteção de Dados na Aplicação da Lei – referencial de adequação; parecer sobre o acordo administrativo H3C/PCAOB; declaração sobre novos projetos de disposições no âmbito de um protocolo da Convenção sobre o Cibercrime; resposta ao questionário da CE sobre o tratamento de dados pessoais para fins de investigação científica e debate sobre a política de confidencialidade da WhatsApp

Bruxelas, 3 de fevereiro – Na sua 45.ª sessão plenária, o CEPD adotou uma vasta gama de documentos. Debateu ainda a política de confidencialidade atualizada da WhatsApp.

O CEPD adotou recomendações sobre o referencial de adequação ao abrigo da Diretiva sobre a Proteção de Dados na Aplicação da Lei. O CEPD assegura a coerência na aplicação da legislação da UE em matéria de proteção de dados na União, incluindo a aplicação da Diretiva sobre a Proteção de Dados na Aplicação da Lei, que diz respeito ao tratamento de dados pessoais para efeitos de aplicação coerciva da lei. O objetivo das recomendações é fornecer uma lista de elementos a analisar durante a avaliação da adequação de um país terceiro ao abrigo da referida diretiva. O documento recorda o conceito e os aspetos processuais da adequação, segundo a diretiva e a jurisprudência do TJUE, estabelecendo as normas da UE em matéria de proteção de dados para a cooperação policial e judiciária em matéria penal.

O CEPD adotou um parecer sobre o projeto de acordo administrativo relativo às transferências de dados pessoais entre o Haut Conseil du Commissariat aux Comptes e o Public Company Accounting Oversight Board. Este acordo administrativo será apresentado à autoridade de segurança francesa para autorização a nível nacional. A referida autoridade francesa acompanhará a aplicação prática do acordo administrativo e, se necessário, suspenderá qualquer transferência efetuada pelo Haut Conseil du Commissariat aux Comptes, se o acordo deixar de proporcionar aos titulares de dados um nível de proteção essencialmente equivalente.

O CEPD adotou uma declaração sobre os projetos de disposições no âmbito de um protocolo da Convenção sobre o Cibercrime. Essa declaração complementa o contributo do CEPD para o projeto de Segundo Protocolo Adicional da Convenção do Conselho da Europa sobre o Cibercrime (Convenção de Budapeste) e surge na sequência da publicação dos novos projetos de disposições.

Nessa declaração, o CEPD recorda que as disposições debatidas atualmente são suscetíveis de afetar as condições de acesso aos dados pessoais na UE para efeitos de aplicação coerciva da lei, apelando a um exame atento das negociações em curso pelas instituições competentes da UE e nacionais. O CEPD salienta, além disso, a necessidade de garantir total coerência com o acervo da UE no domínio da proteção de dados pessoais.

O CEPD adotou a sua resposta ao questionário da Comissão Europeia sobre o tratamento de dados pessoais para fins de investigação científica, centrando-se na investigação no domínio da saúde. As respostas fornecidas pelo CEPD constituem uma posição preliminar sobre este tema e visam clarificar a aplicação do Regulamento Geral sobre a Proteção de Dados no domínio da investigação científica relacionada com a saúde. O CEPD está atualmente a elaborar orientações sobre o tratamento de dados pessoais para fins de investigação científica que irão aprofundar estas questões.

Por último, os membros do Comité procederam a uma troca de pontos de vista sobre a recente atualização da política de confidencialidade da WhatsApp. O CEPD continuará a facilitar este intercâmbio de informações entre as autoridades, a fim de assegurar uma aplicação coerente da legislação em matéria de proteção de dados em toda a UE, em conformidade com o seu mandato.

 

Nota aos editores:
Convém assinalar que todos os documentos adotados durante a sessão plenária do CEPD serão objeto das verificações jurídicas, linguísticas e de formatação necessárias, após o que serão publicados no sítio web do CEPD.

EDPB_Press Release_2021_1

28 January 2021

 

On the occasion of the 15th annual Data Protection Day, the Members of the EDPB bring you a joint message. Today is an opportunity to reflect on the efforts we make day after day to empower individuals, encourage business to be compliant and to enable trust.  From all of us at the EDPB, we wish you a very happy Data Protection Day.

18 January 2021

The EDPB adopted guidelines on examples regarding data breach notification. These guidelines complement the WP 29 guidance on data breach notification by introducing more practice orientated guidance and recommendations. They aim to help data controllers in deciding how to handle data breaches and what factors to consider during risk assessment. The guidelines contain an inventory of data breach notification cases deemed most common by the national supervisory authorities (SAs), such as ransomware attacks; data exfiltration attacks; and lost or stolen devices and paper documents. Per case category, the guidelines present the most typical good or bad practices, advice on how risks should be identified and assessed, highlight the factors that should be given particular consideration, as well as inform in which cases the controller should notify the SA and/or notify the data subjects. The guidelines will be submitted for public consultation for a period of six weeks.

 

The guidelines and more information about the public consultation are available here

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2021_02

 

15 January 2021

Bruxelas, 15 de janeiro — O CEPD e a AEPD adotaram pareceres conjuntos sobre duas novas séries de cláusulas contratuais-tipo (CCT): um parecer sobre as CCT concluídas entre os responsáveis pelo tratamento e os subcontratantes e um parecer sobre as CCT para a transferência de dados pessoais para países terceiros.

As CCT responsáveis pelo tratamento/subcontratantes terão efeito a nível de toda a UE e visam garantir uma harmonização total e a segurança jurídica, em todo o seu território, no que diz respeito aos contratos entre os responsáveis pelo tratamento e os respetivos subcontratantes.

Andrea Jelinek, Presidente do CEPD, afirmou o seguinte: «O CEPD e a AEPD congratulam-se com as CCT responsáveis pelo tratamento/subcontratantes enquanto instrumento de responsabilização único, sólido e à escala da UE, que facilitará o cumprimento das disposições do Regulamento Geral sobre a Proteção de Dados (RGPD) e do Regulamento da UE sobre a proteção de dados. O CEPD e a AEPD solicitam, nomeadamente, que as partes sejam suficientemente elucidadas quanto às situações em que podem recorrer a estas CCT e salientam que não devem ser excluídas as situações que envolvem transferências para fora da UE.»

Foram solicitadas várias alterações a fim de tornar o texto mais claro e assegurar a sua utilidade prática no decurso das operações quotidianas dos responsáveis pelo tratamento e dos subcontratantes. As alterações incluem a interação entre os dois documentos, a chamada «cláusula de atracagem», que permite a novas entidades aderir às CCT, e outros aspetos relacionados com as obrigações dos subcontratantes. Além disso, o CEPD e a AEPD sugerem que os anexos das CCT clarifiquem, tanto quanto possível, as funções e responsabilidades de cada uma das partes no que respeita a cada atividade de tratamento — qualquer ambiguidade dificultaria o cumprimento das obrigações dos responsáveis pelo tratamento ou dos subcontratantes ao abrigo do princípio da responsabilidade.

Wojciech Wiewiórowski, da AEPD, acrescentou: «Estamos convictos de que estas CCT podem facilitar o cumprimento, por parte dos responsáveis pelo tratamento e dos subcontratantes, das obrigações que lhes incumbem, tanto ao abrigo do RGPD como no âmbito do quadro jurídico das instituições e organismos da UE. Esperamos, além disso, que estas CCT garantam uma maior harmonização e uma maior segurança jurídica às pessoas singulares e aos seus dados pessoais. É neste contexto que pretendemos fazer com que estes documentos sejam tão perenes quanto possível.»

Os projetos de CCT para a transferência de dados pessoais para países terceiros em conformidade com o artigo 46.º, n.º2, alínea c), do RGPD substituirão as CCT existentes no que respeita às transferências internacionais que foram adotadas com base na Diretiva 95/46 e tiveram de ser atualizadas a fim de as harmonizar com os requisitos do RGPD e ter em conta o acórdão do TJUE «Schrems II», bem como de melhor refletir o recurso generalizado a novas operações de tratamento mais complexas que, frequentemente, envolvem múltiplos importadores e exportadores de dados. Em especial, as novas CCT incluem salvaguardas mais específicas nos casos em que a legislação do país de destino tem um impacto sobre o cumprimento das cláusulas, nomeadamente em caso de pedidos vinculativos por parte das autoridades públicas, tendo em vista a divulgação de dados pessoais.

Wojciech Wiewiórowski, da AEPD, acrescentou: «Tendo em conta a nossa experiência prática, formulámos estas observações com o objetivo de melhorar estas CCT e garantir plenamente que os dados pessoais dos cidadãos da UE beneficiem de um nível de proteção essencialmente equivalente aquando de transferências para países terceiros. Pensamos que estas sugestões e alterações são essenciais para a realização prática destes objetivos.»

De um modo geral, o CEPD e a AEPD consideram que os projetos de CCT apresentam um nível reforçado de proteção das pessoas em causa. O CEPD e a AEPD congratulam-se, especialmente, com as disposições específicas destinadas a dar resposta a alguns dos principais problemas identificados no acórdão Schrems II. Consideram, no entanto, que várias disposições podem ser melhoradas ou clarificadas, tais como o âmbito de aplicação das CCT; certos direitos de terceiros beneficiários; determinadas obrigações no que respeita a transferências ulteriores; aspetos da avaliação da legislação de países terceiros em matéria de acesso aos dados públicos por parte das autoridades públicas; e a notificação à autoridade de controlo.

A presidente do CEPD, Andrea Jelinek, acrescentou: «As condições em que as CCT podem ser utilizadas devem ser claras para as organizações e as pessoas em causa devem poder dispor de direitos e vias de recurso eficazes. Além disso, as CCT devem prever uma distribuição clara dos papéis e do regime de responsabilidade entre as partes. No que respeita à necessidade de, em certos casos, adotar medidas suplementares ad-hoc a fim de garantir que as pessoas em causa beneficiem de um nível de proteção essencialmente equivalente ao que lhes é garantido na UE, as novas CCT deverão ser utilizadas juntamente com as recomendações do CEPD sobre medidas suplementares

O CEPD e a AEPD convidam a Comissão a consultar a versão final das recomendações do CEPD sobre medidas suplementares, caso esta seja adotada antes da decisão da Comissão sobre as CCT. Este documento foi apresentado para consulta pública até 21 de dezembro de 2020 e poderá ser sujeito a eventuais alterações com base nos resultados dessa consulta.

 

Nota aos editores:  
Convém assinalar que todos os documentos adotados durante a sessão plenária do CEPD serão objeto das verificações jurídicas, linguísticas e de formatação necessárias, após o que serão publicados no sítio web do CEPD.

 

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2021_01