Comitato europeo per la protezione dei dati

EDPB News

16 April 2021

The two EDPB opinions on the European Commission draft Implementing Decisions on the adequate protection of personal data in the United Kingdom have now been published on the EDPB website.

Opinion 14/2021 is based on the GDPR and assesses both general data protection aspects and government access to personal data transferred from the EEA for the purposes of law enforcement and national security included in the draft adequacy decision.

Opinion 15/2021 is based on the Law Enforcement Directive (LED) and analyses the draft adequacy decision in the light of Recommendations 01/2021 on the adequacy referential under the Law Enforcement Directive, as well as the relevant case law reflected in Recommendations 02/2020 on the European Essential Guarantees for surveillance measures. This is the first draft implementing decision on a third country’s adequacy under the LED ever presented by the European Commission and assessed by the EDPB.

14 April 2021

Opinions on draft UK adequacy decisions, Guidelines on the application of Article 65(1)(a) GDPR, Guidelines on the targeting of social media users and Statement on international agreements including transfers

During its plenary session, the EDPB adopted two Opinions on the draft UK adequacy decisions. Opinion 14/2021 is based on the GDPR and assesses both general data protection aspects and government access to personal data transferred from the EEA for the purposes of law enforcement and national security included in the draft adequacy decision. This assessment is based on the GDPR Adequacy Referential WP254. Opinion 15/2021 is based on the Law Enforcement Directive (LED) and analyses the draft adequacy decision in the light of Recommendations 01/2021 on the adequacy referential under the Law Enforcement Directive, as well as the relevant case law reflected in Recommendations 02/2020 on the European Essential Guarantees for surveillance measures. This is the first draft implementing decision on a third country’s adequacy under the LED ever presented by the European Commission and assessed by the EDPB. 

The EDPB notes that there are key areas of strong alignment between the EU and the UK data protection frameworks on certain core provisions such as: grounds for lawful and fair processing for legitimate purposes; purpose limitation; data quality and proportionality; data retention, security and confidentiality; transparency; special categories of data; and on automated decision making and profiling.

EDPB Chair, Andrea Jelinek said: "The UK data protection framework is largely based on the EU data protection framework. The UK Data Protection Act 2018 further specifies the application of the GDPR in UK law, in addition to transposing the LED, as well as granting powers and imposing duties on the national data protection supervisory authority, the ICO. Therefore, the EDPB recognises that the UK has mirrored, for the most part, the GDPR and LED in its data protection framework and when analysing its law and practice, the EDPB identified many aspects to be essentially equivalent. However, whilst laws can evolve, this alignment should be maintained. So we welcome the Commission's decision to limit the granted adequacy in time and the intention to closely monitor developments in the UK.”

The EDPB underlines that several items should be further assessed and/or closely monitored by the European Commission in its decision based on the GDPR, such as: 

  • Immigration Exemption and its consequences on restrictions on data subject rights;
  • The application of restrictions to onward transfers of EEA personal data transferred to the UK, on the basis of, for instance, future adequacy decisions adopted by the UK, international agreements concluded between the UK and third countries, or derogations.

Regarding access by public authorities for national security purposes to personal data transferred to the UK, the EDPB welcomes the establishment of the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (IPT) to address the challenges of redress in the area of national security, and the introduction of Judicial Commissioners in the Investigatory Powers Act (IPA) 2016 to ensure better oversight in that same field. The EDPB still identifies a number of points requiring further clarifications and/or monitoring: 

  • Bulk interceptions;
  • Independent assessment and oversight of the use of automated processing tools;
  • Safeguards provided under UK law when it comes to overseas disclosure, in particular in light of the application of national security exemptions.

The Board adopted Guidelines on the application of Article 65(1)(a) GDPR to delineate the main stages of the procedure and clarify the competence of the EDPB when adopting a legally binding decision on the basis of Article 65(1)(a) GDPR. The Guidelines also include a description of the applicable procedural safeguards and remedies. The guidelines will be subject to public consultation for a period of six weeks.

The EDPB adopted a final version of the Guidelines on the targeting of social media users following public consultation. The aim of the Guidelines is to clarify the roles and responsibilities of social media providers and targeted individuals. The final version integrates updated wording in order to address comments and feedback received during the public consultation.

The EDPB adopted a Statement on international agreements including transfers. The EDPB invites EU Member States to assess and, where necessary, review their international agreements that involve international transfers of personal data and which were concluded before 24 May 2016 (for those relevant to the GDPR) and 6 May 2016 (for those relevant to the LED) to align them, where necessary, with EU data protection law. 

The agenda of the forty-eighth plenary is available here.

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2021_03

12 April 2021

On April 13th, the EDPB will hold its 48th plenary session. The agenda for the 48th plenary is available here

 

 

06 April 2021

The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) and the European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS) adopted a joint opinion on the Proposals for a Digital Green Certificate. The Digital Green Certificate aims to facilitate the exercise of the right to free movement within the EU during the COVID-19 pandemic by establishing a common framework for the issuance, verification and acceptance of interoperable COVID-19 vaccination, testing and recovery certificates. 

With this Joint Opinion, the EDPB and the EDPS invite the co-legislators to ensure that the Digital Green Certificate is fully in line with EU personal data protection legislation. The data protection commissioners from all EU and European Economic Area countries highlight the need to mitigate the risks to fundamental rights of EU citizens and residents that may result from issuing the Digital Green Certificate, including its possible unintended secondary uses. The EDPB and the EDPS underline that the use of the Digital Green Certificate may not, in any way, result in direct or indirect discrimination of individuals, and must be fully in line with the fundamental principles of necessity, proportionality and effectiveness. Given the nature of the measures put forward by the Proposal, the EDPB and the EDPS consider that the introduction of the Digital Green Certificate should be accompanied by a comprehensive legal framework.

Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the EDPB, said: "A Digital Green Certificate that is accepted in all Member States can be a major step forward in re-starting travel across the EU. Any measure adopted at national or EU level that involves processing of personal data must respect the general principles of effectiveness, necessity and proportionality. Therefore, the EDPB and the EDPS recommend that any further use of the Digital Green Certificate by the Member States must have an appropriate legal basis in the Member States and all the necessary safeguards must be in place."

Wojciech Wiewiórowski, EDPS, said: It must be made clear that the Proposal does not allow for - and must not lead to - the creation of any sort of central database of personal data at EU level. In addition, it must be ensured that personal data is not processed any longer than what is strictly necessary and that access to and use of this data is not permitted once the pandemic has ended. I have always stressed that measures taken in the fight against COVID-19 are temporary and it is our duty to ensure that they are not here to stay after the crisis.”

In the current emergency situation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, the EDPB and the EDPS insist that the principles of effectiveness, necessity, proportionality and non-discrimination are upheld. The EDPB and the EDPS reiterate that, at the moment of writing, there seems to be little scientific evidence as to whether having received the COVID-19 vaccine (or having recovered from COVID-19) grants immunity, and, by extension, how long such immunity may last. But scientific evidence is growing daily.

Moreover, a number of factors are still unknown regarding the efficacy of the vaccination in reducing transmission. The Proposal should lay down clear and precise rules governing the scope and application of the Digital Green Certificate and impose appropriate safeguards. This will allow individuals, whose personal data is affected, to have sufficient guarantees that they will be protected, in an effective way, against the risk of potential discrimination.

The Proposal must expressly include that access to and subsequent use of individuals’ data by EU Member States once the pandemic has ended is not permitted. At the same time, the EDPB and the EDPS highlight that the application of the proposed Regulation must be strictly limited to the current COVID-19 crisis.

The Joint Opinion includes specific recommendations for further clarifications on the categories of data concerned by the Proposal, data storage, transparency obligations and identification of controllers and processors for the processing of personal data. 

Note to editors: Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2021_03

26 March 2021

On March 30th, the EDPB will hold its 47th plenary session. During the plenary, the EDPB will dicsuss the European Commission's proposal for Regulations on a Digital Green Certificate.

The agenda for the 47th plenary is available here

16 March 2021

Due to the high number of responses, the call for expression of interest is already closed.

On April 30, the EDPB is organising a remote stakeholder event on the topic "application of the GDPR to the processing of personal data for scientific research purposes”. Representatives from, among others, individual companies, sector organisations, NGOs, law firms and academia with an expertise on the field are welcome to express interest in attending.

In order to express your interest to participate in the event, please fill in this form.

Places will be allocated on a first come, first served basis, depending on availability. Nonetheless, the EDPB reserves the right to give precedence to specific stakeholders, in light of their relevance in the field. Selected participants will receive the confirmation of their registration in the event via e-mail.

Detailed information and the programme of the event will be available shortly.

As we would like to have a balanced and representative audience, participation will be limited to one participant per organisation.

When? 30 April 2021, from 10:00 - 16:00h CET

10 March 2021

L'EPDB adotta il programma di lavoro 2021-2022, una dichiarazione sul regolamento ePrivacy, le Linee-guida sugli assistenti vocali virtuali e sui veicoli connessi, e discute della decisione di adeguatezza relativa al Regno Unito.

Bruxelles, 10 marzo - Nel corso della 46 a sessione plenaria, l'EPDB ha adottato un'ampia gamma di documenti e discusso i progetti di decisioni di adeguatezza relativi al Regno Unito presentati dalla Commissione europea.

Il Comitato ha adottato il programma di lavoro biennale per il periodo 2021-2022, ai sensi dell'articolo 29 del suo regolamento interno. Il programma di lavoro si basa sulle priorità individuate dalla strategia dell'EDPB 2021-2023 e permetterà di dare attuazione agli obiettivi strategici del Comitato.

L'EDPB ha adottato una dichiarazione sul progetto di regolamento ePrivacy nella quale accoglie con favore l'accordo sul mandato negoziale raggiunto dal Consiglio, che rappresenta un passo positivo verso la definizione del regolamento ePrivacy. L'EDPB ricorda che alle autorità nazionali responsabili dell'applicazione del GDPR dovrebbe essere affidata la vigilanza delle disposizioni sulla tutela della vita privata del futuro regolamento ePrivacy, al fine di garantire un'interpretazione e un'applicazione armonizzate del regolamento in tutta l'UE e parità di condizioni nel mercato unico digitale.

Andrea Jelinek, la presidente dell'EDPB, ha dichiarato: "Il regolamento ePrivacy non dovrebbe in alcun caso ridurre il livello di tutela offerto dall'attuale direttiva ePrivacy e dovrebbe integrare il GDPR fornendo ulteriori e robuste garanzie per la riservatezza e la protezione di tutti i tipi di comunicazioni elettroniche."

L'EDPB ha adottato le Linee-guida sugli assistenti vocali virtuali (VVA). L'obiettivo principale delle linee-guida è identificare alcune delle sfide più rilevanti per i VVA in termini di  conformità alle norme applicabili e fornire raccomandazioni  sulle modalità per affrontare tali sfide al meglio. Le linee-guida saranno sottoposte a consultazione pubblica per un periodo di sei settimane.

L'EDPB ha adottato la versione definitiva delle Linee-guida sui veicoli connessi a seguito della consultazione pubblica. Le linee-guida si concentrano sul trattamento dei dati personali in relazione all'uso dei veicoli connessi a fini non professionali da parte degli interessati. La versione definitiva comprende formulazioni aggiornate e chiarimenti aggiuntivi per rispondere alle osservazioni e ai contributi ricevuti durante la consultazione pubblica.

Il Comitato ha discusso dei progetti di decisioni di adeguatezza relative al Regno Unito ricevuti dalla Commissione europea. L'EDPB esaminerà approfonditamente i progetti di decisioni tenendo conto dell’importanza di garantire continuità e un elevato livello di protezione per i trasferimenti di dati dall'UE.

Infine, l'EDPB ha adottato un parere congiunto EDPB-GEPD relativo alla legge sulla governance dei dati (Data Governance Act). Sul punto,  verrà pubblicato uno specifico comunicato stampa  in giornata.

Nota editoriale:
Si prega di notare che tutti i documenti adottati durante la plenaria dell'EDPB sono soggetti ai necessari controlli giuridici, linguistici e di formattazione e saranno resi disponibili sul sito web dell'EDPB una volta che questi siano stati completati.

EDPB_Press Release_2021_02

10 March 2021

The EDPB and EDPS adopted a joint opinion on the proposal for a Data Governance Act (DGA). The DGA aims to foster the availability of data by increasing trust in data intermediaries [1] and by strengthening data-sharing mechanisms across the EU. In particular, the DGA intends to promote the availability of public sector data for reuse, sharing of data among businesses and allowing personal data to be used with the help of a ‘personal data-sharing intermediary’. The DGA also seeks to enable the use of data for altruistic purposes.

The EDPB and the EDPS acknowledge the legitimate objective of the DGA to improve the conditions for data sharing in the internal market. At the same time, the protection of personal data is an essential and integral element for trust in the digital economy. With this joint opinion, the EDPB and the EDPS invite the co-legislators to ensure that the future DGA is fully in line with the EU personal data protection legislation, thus fostering trust in the digital economy and upholding the level of protection provided by EU law under the supervision of the EU Member States’ supervisory authorities.  

Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the EDPB, said:The EU's data protection legal framework does not stand in the way of developing the data economy. Quite the contrary, it enables it: trust in any kind of data sharing can only be achieved by respecting existing data protection legislation. The GDPR is the foundation on which the European data governance model must be built. That is why we underline the need to ensure consistency with the GDPR with regard to the competence of the supervisory authorities, the roles of the different actors involved, the legal basis for the processing of personal data, the necessary safeguards and the exercise of the rights of the data subjects.

Wojciech Wiewiórowski, EDPS, said:We understand the growing importance of data for the economy and society as outlined in the European Data Strategy. However, with “big data comes big responsibility”, therefore appropriate data protection safeguards must be put in place. The overarching framework for European data spaces should ensure that the data protection acquis is not affected.

The EDPB and EDPS consider that the EU legislator should ensure that the wording of the DGA clearly and unambiguously state that this act will not affect the level of protection of individuals’ personal data, nor will any rights and obligations set out in the data protection legislation be altered.  

Concerning the reuse of personal data held by public sector bodies, the EDPB and EDPS recommend aligning the DGA with the existing rules on the protection of personal data laid down in the GDPR and with the Open Data Directive. Furthermore, it should be clarified that the reuse of personal data held by public sector bodies may only be allowed if it is grounded in EU or Member State law. Such laws should include a list of clear compatible purposes for which further processing may be lawfully authorised or constitutes a necessary and proportionate measure in a democratic society to safeguard the objectives referred to in Article 23 of the GDPR. 

On data sharing service providers, the joint opinion highlights the need to ensure prior information and controls for individuals, taking into account the principles of data protection by design and by default, transparency and purpose limitation.  Furthermore, the modalities upon which such service providers would effectively assist individuals in exercising their rights as data subjects should be clarified. 

As for data altruism, the EDPB and the EDPS recommend that the DGA should better define the purposes of general interest of such “data altruism”. Data altruism should be organised in such a way that it allows individuals to easily give, but also, withdraw their consent. 

In light of the possible risks for data subjects when their personal data might be processed by data sharing service providers or data altruism organisations, the EDPB and EDPS consider that the declaratory registration regimes for these entities, as laid down in the DGA, do not provide for a sufficiently stringent vetting procedure applicable to such services. Therefore, the EDPB and EDPS recommend exploring alternative procedures that foresee a more systematic inclusion of accountability tools, in particular the adherence to a code of conduct or certification mechanism.

The joint opinion also includes recommendations on the designation of the supervisory authorities as main competent authorities for the control of the compliance with the DGA provisions, in consultation with other relevant sectorial authorities.

______________________________________
[1] See Explanatory Memorandum of the Proposal, page 1

Note to editors:  Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2021_02

03 February 2021

L'EDPB adotta raccomandazioni sull'articolo 36 della direttiva « polizia e giustizia », in materia di criteri di riferimento per l'adeguatezza, un parere sull'accordo amministrativo H3C/PCAOB, una dichiarazione su un nuovo progetto di disposizioni relative a un protocollo alla convenzione sulla criminalità informatica, la risposta al questionario della Commissione europea sul trattamento dei dati personali per scopi di ricerca scientifica & discute della privacy policy di Whatsapp

Bruxelles, 3 febbraio — Durante la sua 45a sessione plenaria, il Comitato ha adottato numerosi documenti. Inoltre, il comitato ha discusso dell’aggiornamento della privacy policy di Whatsapp.

L'EDPB ha adottato raccomandazioni sui criteri di riferimento per l'adeguatezza ai sensi della direttiva « polizia e giustizia » (LED). L'EDPB garantisce l'applicazione coerente del diritto dell'UE in materia di protezione dei dati, compresa la direttiva « polizia e giustizia » (LED) che disciplina il trattamento dei dati personali nelle attività giudiziarie e di polizia. Le raccomandazioni intendono fornire un elenco di elementi da esaminare nel valutare l'adeguatezza di un paese terzo nell'ambito della LED. Il documento ricorda il concetto e gli aspetti procedurali della valutazione di adeguatezza secondo la LED e la giurisprudenza della CGUE, e definisce i criteri di riferimento validi nell'UE in materia di protezione dei dati ai fini della cooperazione di polizia e giudiziaria in materia penale.

L'EDPB ha adottato un parere sul progetto di accordo amministrativo (AA) per i trasferimenti di dati personali tra l’Haut Conseil du Commissariat aux Comptes (H3C) e il Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB). Tale AA sarà sottoposto all'autorità di controllo francese per la necessaria  autorizzazione a livello nazionale. L'autorità di controllo francese vigilerà sull'applicazione  dell'AA e, se necessario, sospenderà qualsiasi trasferimento effettuato dall'H3C qualora l'AA cessi di garantire agli interessati un livello di protezione sostanzialmente equivalente.

L'EDPB ha adottato una dichiarazione sul progetto di disposizioni relative a un protocollo alla convenzione sulla criminalità informatica.  Tale dichiarazione integra il contributo del comitato  al progetto di secondo protocollo addizionale alla convenzione del Consiglio d'Europa sulla criminalità informatica (convenzione di Budapest) e fa seguito alla pubblicazione del nuovo progetto di disposizioni.

Nella dichiarazione, l'EDPB ricorda che le disposizioni attualmente in discussione possono incidere sulle condizioni per l’accesso ai dati personali nell'UE per finalità di polizia e giustizia e sollecita un attento esame dei negoziati in corso da parte delle competenti istituzioni nazionali e dell'UE. Inoltre, l'EDPB sottolinea la necessità di garantire la piena coerenza con l'acquis dell'UE nel settore della protezione dei dati personali.

L'EDPB ha adottato la risposta al questionario della Commissione europea sul trattamento dei dati personali per scopi di ricerca scientifica, concentrandosi sulla ricerca connessa alla salute. Le risposte fornite dall'EDPB rappresentano una posizione preliminare sul tema e mirano a chiarire l'applicazione del regolamento generale sulla protezione dei dati nel settore della ricerca scientifica in materia di salute. L'EDPB sta attualmente elaborando orientamenti sul trattamento dei dati personali a fini di ricerca scientifica che affronteranno tali questioni in maggiore dettaglio.

Infine, i membri del comitato hanno avuto uno scambio di opinioni sul recente aggiornamento della  privacy policy di WhatsApp. L'EDPB continuerà ad agevolare tale scambio di informazioni tra le autorità, al fine di garantire un'applicazione coerente della normativa in materia di protezione dei dati in tutta l'UE conformemente al suo mandato.

 

Nota editoriale:
si prega di osservare che i documenti adottati durante la plenaria del comitato sono soggetti ai necessari controlli giuridici, linguistici e di formattazione e saranno messi a disposizione sul sito web dell'EDPB una volta completati tali controlli.

EDPB_Press Release_2021_1

18 January 2021

The EDPB adopted guidelines on examples regarding data breach notification. These guidelines complement the WP 29 guidance on data breach notification by introducing more practice orientated guidance and recommendations. They aim to help data controllers in deciding how to handle data breaches and what factors to consider during risk assessment. The guidelines contain an inventory of data breach notification cases deemed most common by the national supervisory authorities (SAs), such as ransomware attacks; data exfiltration attacks; and lost or stolen devices and paper documents. Per case category, the guidelines present the most typical good or bad practices, advice on how risks should be identified and assessed, highlight the factors that should be given particular consideration, as well as inform in which cases the controller should notify the SA and/or notify the data subjects. The guidelines will be submitted for public consultation for a period of six weeks.

 

The guidelines and more information about the public consultation are available here

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2021_02

 

15 January 2021

Bruxelles, 15 gennaio — Il comitato europeo per la protezione dei dati e il Garante europeo per la protezione dei dati (GEPD) hanno adottato pareri congiunti su  nuove clausole contrattuali tipo. Si tratta di un parere sulle clausole contrattuali tipo per i contratti tra titolari e responsabili del trattamento e di un parere sulle clausole contrattuali tipo per il trasferimento di dati personali verso paesi terzi.

Le clausole contrattuali tipo per i contratti fra titolari e responsabili del trattamento avranno validità nell’intera UE e mirano a garantire la piena armonizzazione e la certezza del diritto in tutta l'UE per quanto riguarda i contratti tra i titolari del trattamento e i rispettivi responsabili del trattamento.

Andrea Jelinek, la presidente del comitato europeo per la protezione dei dati, ha dichiarato:"Il comitato europeo per la protezione dei dati e il GEPD accolgono con favore le clausole contrattuali tipo per i contratti fra titolari e responsabili del trattamento, in quanto rappresentano uno strumento unico, forte e di respiro europeo che faciliterà il rispetto delle disposizioni del regolamento generale sulla protezione dei dati e del regolamento sulla protezione dei dati nelle istituzioni dell’Ue (EUDPR). Il comitato europeo per la protezione dei dati e il GEPD chiedono, fra le altre cose, che vi sia  sufficiente chiarezza  in merito alle situazioni in cui le parti possono fare affidamento su tali clausole contrattuali tipo e sottolineano che le clausole non dovrebbero escludere le situazioni che comportano trasferimenti di dati al di fuori dell'UE."

Sono state chieste varie modifiche al fine di apportare maggiore chiarezza al testo e garantirne l'utilità pratica nelle attività quotidiane di titolari e responsabili del trattamento. Le modifiche  riguardano l'interazione tra i due set di clausole contrattuali, la cosiddetta "clausola di adesione postuma (docking)", che consente l’adesione alle clausole contrattuali tipo da parte di soggetti ulteriori, e altri aspetti relativi agli obblighi per i responsabili del trattamento. Inoltre, il comitato europeo per la protezione dei dati e il GEPD suggeriscono che gli allegati delle clausole contrattuali tipo chiariscano il più possibile i ruoli e le responsabilità di ciascuna delle parti in relazione a ciascuna attività di trattamento — qualsiasi ambiguità renderebbe più difficile per i titolari  o i responsabili del trattamento adempiere ai loro obblighi in virtù del principio di responsabilizzazione (accountability).

Wojciech Wiewiórowski, il Garante europeo per la protezione dei dati, ha dichiarato: "Siamo convinti che queste clausole contrattuali tipo possano facilitare il rispetto degli obblighi di titolari  e  responsabili del trattamento, sia a norma del regolamento generale sulla protezione dei dati sia nel contesto giuridico delle istituzioni e degli organi dell'UE. Ci auguriamo, inoltre, che queste clausole contrattuali tipo garantiscano  ulteriore armonizzazione e certezza del diritto per le persone fisiche e i loro dati personali. È in questo contesto che intendiamo fare in modo che tali strumenti siano il più possibile all’altezza delle sfide future."

Le nuove clausole contrattuali tipo per il trasferimento di dati personali verso paesi terzi a norma dell'articolo 46 (2), lettera c), del RGPD sostituiranno le attuali clausole contrattuali tipo  per i trasferimenti internazionali, che sono state adottate sulla base della direttiva 95/46 e devono essere aggiornate per allinearle ai requisiti del RGPD, anche alla luce della sentenza "Schrems II" della CGUE, e per rispecchiare meglio il ricorso sempre più diffuso a nuovi e più complessi trattamenti che coinvolgono spesso numerosi importatori ed esportatori di dati. Le nuove clausole contrattuali tipo prevedono garanzie più specifiche nel caso in cui la legislazione del paese di destinazione incida sul rispetto delle clausole stesse, in particolare qualora autorità pubbliche ingiungano la comunicazione di dati personali.

Wojciech Wiewiórowski, il Garante europeo per la protezione dei dati, ha dichiarato: "Alla luce delle esperienze raccolte, abbiamo formulato  osservazioni tese a migliorare queste clausole contrattuali tipo così da garantire pienamente che ai dati personali dei cittadini dell'UE sia assicurato un livello di protezione sostanzialmente equivalente in caso di trasferimenti verso paesi terzi. Riteniamo che i suggerimenti e le modifiche indicate siano fondamentali per conseguire tali obiettivi in concreto."

In via generale, il comitato europeo per la protezione dei dati e il GEPD ritengono che le clausole contrattuali tipo proposte offrano un livello di protezione rafforzato per gli interessati, e nello specifico accolgono con favore le disposizioni intese a dare risposta ad alcune delle principali problematiche individuate nella sentenza Schrems II. Tuttavia, il comitato europeo per la protezione dei dati e il GEPD sono del parere che numerose disposizioni siano passibili di miglioramenti o chiarimenti, fra cui quelle concernenti il campo di applicazione delle clausole contrattuali tipo; alcuni diritti dei terzi beneficiari; taluni obblighi relativi ai trasferimenti ulteriori; determinati aspetti legati alla valutazione della legislazione dei paesi terzi in materia di accesso ai dati pubblici da parte delle autorità pubbliche; e la notifica all'autorità di controllo.

Andrea Jelinek, la presidente del comitato europeo per la protezione dei dati, ha aggiunto: « Deve essere chiaro a quali condizioni sia possibile utilizzare le clausole contrattuali tipo, e gli interessati dovrebbero disporre di diritti e mezzi di ricorso effettivi. Inoltre, le clausole contrattuali tipo dovrebbero prevedere una chiara ripartizione dei ruoli e del regime di responsabilità tra le parti. Per quanto riguarda la necessità, in alcuni casi, di misure supplementari ad hoc al fine di assicurare agli interessati un livello di protezione sostanzialmente equivalente a quello garantito all'interno dell'UE, le nuove clausole contrattuali tipo dovranno essere utilizzate insieme alle raccomandazioni del comitato sulle misure supplementari."

Il comitato e il GEPD invitano la Commissione a fare riferimento alla versione definitiva delle raccomandazioni del comitato concernenti le misure supplementari, qualora la versione definitiva delle raccomandazioni fosse adottata prima della decisione della Commissione sulle clausole contrattuali tipo. Le raccomandazioni sono state oggetto di una consultazione pubblica terminata il 21 dicembre 2020 e sono passibili di ulteriori modifiche sulla base dei risultati di tale consultazione.

 

Nota editoriale:
Si prega di osservare che i documenti adottati durante la plenaria del comitato sono soggetti ai necessari controlli giuridici, linguistici e di formattazione e saranno resi disponibili sul sito web del comitato una volta completati tali controlli.

 

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2021_01