Europejska Rada Ochrony Danych

Aktualności EROD

16 April 2021

The two EDPB opinions on the European Commission draft Implementing Decisions on the adequate protection of personal data in the United Kingdom have now been published on the EDPB website.

Opinion 14/2021 is based on the GDPR and assesses both general data protection aspects and government access to personal data transferred from the EEA for the purposes of law enforcement and national security included in the draft adequacy decision.

Opinion 15/2021 is based on the Law Enforcement Directive (LED) and analyses the draft adequacy decision in the light of Recommendations 01/2021 on the adequacy referential under the Law Enforcement Directive, as well as the relevant case law reflected in Recommendations 02/2020 on the European Essential Guarantees for surveillance measures. This is the first draft implementing decision on a third country’s adequacy under the LED ever presented by the European Commission and assessed by the EDPB.

14 April 2021

Opinions on draft UK adequacy decisions, Guidelines on the application of Article 65(1)(a) GDPR, Guidelines on the targeting of social media users and Statement on international agreements including transfers

During its plenary session, the EDPB adopted two Opinions on the draft UK adequacy decisions. Opinion 14/2021 is based on the GDPR and assesses both general data protection aspects and government access to personal data transferred from the EEA for the purposes of law enforcement and national security included in the draft adequacy decision. This assessment is based on the GDPR Adequacy Referential WP254. Opinion 15/2021 is based on the Law Enforcement Directive (LED) and analyses the draft adequacy decision in the light of Recommendations 01/2021 on the adequacy referential under the Law Enforcement Directive, as well as the relevant case law reflected in Recommendations 02/2020 on the European Essential Guarantees for surveillance measures. This is the first draft implementing decision on a third country’s adequacy under the LED ever presented by the European Commission and assessed by the EDPB. 

The EDPB notes that there are key areas of strong alignment between the EU and the UK data protection frameworks on certain core provisions such as: grounds for lawful and fair processing for legitimate purposes; purpose limitation; data quality and proportionality; data retention, security and confidentiality; transparency; special categories of data; and on automated decision making and profiling.

EDPB Chair, Andrea Jelinek said: "The UK data protection framework is largely based on the EU data protection framework. The UK Data Protection Act 2018 further specifies the application of the GDPR in UK law, in addition to transposing the LED, as well as granting powers and imposing duties on the national data protection supervisory authority, the ICO. Therefore, the EDPB recognises that the UK has mirrored, for the most part, the GDPR and LED in its data protection framework and when analysing its law and practice, the EDPB identified many aspects to be essentially equivalent. However, whilst laws can evolve, this alignment should be maintained. So we welcome the Commission's decision to limit the granted adequacy in time and the intention to closely monitor developments in the UK.”

The EDPB underlines that several items should be further assessed and/or closely monitored by the European Commission in its decision based on the GDPR, such as: 

  • Immigration Exemption and its consequences on restrictions on data subject rights;
  • The application of restrictions to onward transfers of EEA personal data transferred to the UK, on the basis of, for instance, future adequacy decisions adopted by the UK, international agreements concluded between the UK and third countries, or derogations.

Regarding access by public authorities for national security purposes to personal data transferred to the UK, the EDPB welcomes the establishment of the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (IPT) to address the challenges of redress in the area of national security, and the introduction of Judicial Commissioners in the Investigatory Powers Act (IPA) 2016 to ensure better oversight in that same field. The EDPB still identifies a number of points requiring further clarifications and/or monitoring: 

  • Bulk interceptions;
  • Independent assessment and oversight of the use of automated processing tools;
  • Safeguards provided under UK law when it comes to overseas disclosure, in particular in light of the application of national security exemptions.

The Board adopted Guidelines on the application of Article 65(1)(a) GDPR to delineate the main stages of the procedure and clarify the competence of the EDPB when adopting a legally binding decision on the basis of Article 65(1)(a) GDPR. The Guidelines also include a description of the applicable procedural safeguards and remedies. The guidelines will be subject to public consultation for a period of six weeks.

The EDPB adopted a final version of the Guidelines on the targeting of social media users following public consultation. The aim of the Guidelines is to clarify the roles and responsibilities of social media providers and targeted individuals. The final version integrates updated wording in order to address comments and feedback received during the public consultation.

The EDPB adopted a Statement on international agreements including transfers. The EDPB invites EU Member States to assess and, where necessary, review their international agreements that involve international transfers of personal data and which were concluded before 24 May 2016 (for those relevant to the GDPR) and 6 May 2016 (for those relevant to the LED) to align them, where necessary, with EU data protection law. 

The agenda of the forty-eighth plenary is available here.

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2021_03

12 April 2021

On April 13th, the EDPB will hold its 48th plenary session. The agenda for the 48th plenary is available here

 

 

06 April 2021

The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) and the European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS) adopted a joint opinion on the Proposals for a Digital Green Certificate. The Digital Green Certificate aims to facilitate the exercise of the right to free movement within the EU during the COVID-19 pandemic by establishing a common framework for the issuance, verification and acceptance of interoperable COVID-19 vaccination, testing and recovery certificates. 

With this Joint Opinion, the EDPB and the EDPS invite the co-legislators to ensure that the Digital Green Certificate is fully in line with EU personal data protection legislation. The data protection commissioners from all EU and European Economic Area countries highlight the need to mitigate the risks to fundamental rights of EU citizens and residents that may result from issuing the Digital Green Certificate, including its possible unintended secondary uses. The EDPB and the EDPS underline that the use of the Digital Green Certificate may not, in any way, result in direct or indirect discrimination of individuals, and must be fully in line with the fundamental principles of necessity, proportionality and effectiveness. Given the nature of the measures put forward by the Proposal, the EDPB and the EDPS consider that the introduction of the Digital Green Certificate should be accompanied by a comprehensive legal framework.

Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the EDPB, said: "A Digital Green Certificate that is accepted in all Member States can be a major step forward in re-starting travel across the EU. Any measure adopted at national or EU level that involves processing of personal data must respect the general principles of effectiveness, necessity and proportionality. Therefore, the EDPB and the EDPS recommend that any further use of the Digital Green Certificate by the Member States must have an appropriate legal basis in the Member States and all the necessary safeguards must be in place."

Wojciech Wiewiórowski, EDPS, said: It must be made clear that the Proposal does not allow for - and must not lead to - the creation of any sort of central database of personal data at EU level. In addition, it must be ensured that personal data is not processed any longer than what is strictly necessary and that access to and use of this data is not permitted once the pandemic has ended. I have always stressed that measures taken in the fight against COVID-19 are temporary and it is our duty to ensure that they are not here to stay after the crisis.”

In the current emergency situation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, the EDPB and the EDPS insist that the principles of effectiveness, necessity, proportionality and non-discrimination are upheld. The EDPB and the EDPS reiterate that, at the moment of writing, there seems to be little scientific evidence as to whether having received the COVID-19 vaccine (or having recovered from COVID-19) grants immunity, and, by extension, how long such immunity may last. But scientific evidence is growing daily.

Moreover, a number of factors are still unknown regarding the efficacy of the vaccination in reducing transmission. The Proposal should lay down clear and precise rules governing the scope and application of the Digital Green Certificate and impose appropriate safeguards. This will allow individuals, whose personal data is affected, to have sufficient guarantees that they will be protected, in an effective way, against the risk of potential discrimination.

The Proposal must expressly include that access to and subsequent use of individuals’ data by EU Member States once the pandemic has ended is not permitted. At the same time, the EDPB and the EDPS highlight that the application of the proposed Regulation must be strictly limited to the current COVID-19 crisis.

The Joint Opinion includes specific recommendations for further clarifications on the categories of data concerned by the Proposal, data storage, transparency obligations and identification of controllers and processors for the processing of personal data. 

Note to editors: Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2021_03

26 March 2021

On March 30th, the EDPB will hold its 47th plenary session. During the plenary, the EDPB will dicsuss the European Commission's proposal for Regulations on a Digital Green Certificate.

The agenda for the 47th plenary is available here

16 March 2021

Due to the high number of responses, the call for expression of interest is already closed.

On April 30, the EDPB is organising a remote stakeholder event on the topic "application of the GDPR to the processing of personal data for scientific research purposes”. Representatives from, among others, individual companies, sector organisations, NGOs, law firms and academia with an expertise on the field are welcome to express interest in attending.

In order to express your interest to participate in the event, please fill in this form.

Places will be allocated on a first come, first served basis, depending on availability. Nonetheless, the EDPB reserves the right to give precedence to specific stakeholders, in light of their relevance in the field. Selected participants will receive the confirmation of their registration in the event via e-mail.

Detailed information and the programme of the event will be available shortly.

As we would like to have a balanced and representative audience, participation will be limited to one participant per organisation.

When? 30 April 2021, from 10:00 - 16:00h CET

10 March 2021

EROD przyjmuje program prac na lata 2021-2022, oświadczenie w sprawie rozporządzenia o prywatności i łączności elektronicznej, wytyczne w sprawie wirtualnego asystenta głosowego i w sprawie pojazdów podłączonych do sieci oraz omawia kwestię odpowiedniego stopnia ochrony w Zjednoczonym Królestwie.

Bruksela, 10 marca – podczas 46. sesji plenarnej EROD przyjęła szeroki wachlarz dokumentów i omówiła projekty decyzji stwierdzających odpowiedni stopień ochrony zapewnianej przez Zjednoczone Królestwo, które przedstawiła Komisja Europejska.

Zgodnie z art. 29 regulaminu wewnętrznego Europejskiej Rady Ochrony Danych przyjęła ona swój dwuletni program prac na lata 2021-2022. Program prac jest zgodny z priorytetami określonymi w strategii EROD na lata 2021-2023 i będzie służyć realizacji strategicznych celów Rady.

EROD przyjęła oświadczenie w sprawie projektu rozporządzenia o prywatności i łączności elektronicznej. W swoim oświadczeniu EROD z zadowoleniem przyjmuje osiągnięte w Radzie porozumienie w sprawie mandatu negocjacyjnego jako pozytywny krok w kierunku sfinalizowania rozporządzenia o prywatności i łączności elektronicznej. EROD przypomina, że dozór nad przepisami dotyczącymi prywatności zawartymi w przyszłym rozporządzeniu o prywatności i łączności elektronicznej należy powierzyć organom krajowym odpowiedzialnym za egzekwowanie RODO, aby zapewnić zharmonizowaną wykładnię i jednolite egzekwowanie rozporządzenia o prywatności i łączności elektronicznej w całej UE oraz zagwarantować równe warunki działania na jednolitym rynku cyfrowym.

Przewodnicząca EROD Andrea Jelinek powiedziała: „Rozporządzenie w sprawie e-prywatności nie może w żadnym razie obniżać poziomu ochrony oferowanego przez obowiązującą obecnie dyrektywę o prywatności i łączności elektronicznej oraz powinno uzupełniać RODO, zapewniając dodatkowe silne gwarancje poszanowania poufności i ochrony danych w odniesieniu do wszystkich rodzajów łączności elektronicznej”.

EROD przyjęła wytyczne w sprawie wirtualnego asystenta głosowego. Celem tych wytycznych jest wskazanie najważniejszych wyzwań związanych z przestrzeganiem przepisów dotyczących wirtualnego asystenta głosowego oraz przedstawienie odpowiednim interesariuszom zaleceń, w jaki sposób radzić sobie z tymi wyzwaniami. Wytyczne będą przedmiotem konsultacji publicznych przez okres sześciu tygodni.

Po konsultacjach publicznych EROD przyjęła ostateczną wersję wytycznych w sprawie pojazdów podłączonych do sieci. Wytyczne koncentrują się na przetwarzaniu danych osobowych w związku z prywatnym (niezawodowym) wykorzystywaniem pojazdów podłączonych do sieci przez podmioty danych. W ostatecznej wersji zaktualizowano brzmienie tekstu i zawarto dodatkowe wyjaśnienia, aby uwzględnić uwagi i informacje zwrotne otrzymane w trakcie konsultacji publicznych.

Rada omówiła projekty decyzji stwierdzających odpowiedni stopień ochrony zapewnianej przez Zjednoczone Królestwo, które otrzymała od Komisji Europejskiej. EROD przeanalizuje dogłębnie projekty decyzji, biorąc pod uwagę, jak ważne jest zagwarantowanie ciągłości i wysokiego poziomu ochrony w przypadku przekazywania danych z UE.

Ponadto EROD przyjęła wspólną opinię EROD i EIOD dotyczącą aktu w sprawie zarządzania danymi. W dniu dzisiejszym zostanie opublikowany osobny komunikat prasowy na ten temat.

Informacje dla redaktorów:
Uwaga – wszystkie dokumenty przyjęte podczas posiedzenia plenarnego EROD podlegają niezbędnym kontrolom pod względem prawnym, językowym i pod względem formatowania i będą udostępniane na stronie internetowej EROD po zakończeniu tych kontroli.

EDPB_Press Release_2021_02

10 March 2021

The EDPB and EDPS adopted a joint opinion on the proposal for a Data Governance Act (DGA). The DGA aims to foster the availability of data by increasing trust in data intermediaries [1] and by strengthening data-sharing mechanisms across the EU. In particular, the DGA intends to promote the availability of public sector data for reuse, sharing of data among businesses and allowing personal data to be used with the help of a ‘personal data-sharing intermediary’. The DGA also seeks to enable the use of data for altruistic purposes.

The EDPB and the EDPS acknowledge the legitimate objective of the DGA to improve the conditions for data sharing in the internal market. At the same time, the protection of personal data is an essential and integral element for trust in the digital economy. With this joint opinion, the EDPB and the EDPS invite the co-legislators to ensure that the future DGA is fully in line with the EU personal data protection legislation, thus fostering trust in the digital economy and upholding the level of protection provided by EU law under the supervision of the EU Member States’ supervisory authorities.  

Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the EDPB, said:The EU's data protection legal framework does not stand in the way of developing the data economy. Quite the contrary, it enables it: trust in any kind of data sharing can only be achieved by respecting existing data protection legislation. The GDPR is the foundation on which the European data governance model must be built. That is why we underline the need to ensure consistency with the GDPR with regard to the competence of the supervisory authorities, the roles of the different actors involved, the legal basis for the processing of personal data, the necessary safeguards and the exercise of the rights of the data subjects.

Wojciech Wiewiórowski, EDPS, said:We understand the growing importance of data for the economy and society as outlined in the European Data Strategy. However, with “big data comes big responsibility”, therefore appropriate data protection safeguards must be put in place. The overarching framework for European data spaces should ensure that the data protection acquis is not affected.

The EDPB and EDPS consider that the EU legislator should ensure that the wording of the DGA clearly and unambiguously state that this act will not affect the level of protection of individuals’ personal data, nor will any rights and obligations set out in the data protection legislation be altered.  

Concerning the reuse of personal data held by public sector bodies, the EDPB and EDPS recommend aligning the DGA with the existing rules on the protection of personal data laid down in the GDPR and with the Open Data Directive. Furthermore, it should be clarified that the reuse of personal data held by public sector bodies may only be allowed if it is grounded in EU or Member State law. Such laws should include a list of clear compatible purposes for which further processing may be lawfully authorised or constitutes a necessary and proportionate measure in a democratic society to safeguard the objectives referred to in Article 23 of the GDPR. 

On data sharing service providers, the joint opinion highlights the need to ensure prior information and controls for individuals, taking into account the principles of data protection by design and by default, transparency and purpose limitation.  Furthermore, the modalities upon which such service providers would effectively assist individuals in exercising their rights as data subjects should be clarified. 

As for data altruism, the EDPB and the EDPS recommend that the DGA should better define the purposes of general interest of such “data altruism”. Data altruism should be organised in such a way that it allows individuals to easily give, but also, withdraw their consent. 

In light of the possible risks for data subjects when their personal data might be processed by data sharing service providers or data altruism organisations, the EDPB and EDPS consider that the declaratory registration regimes for these entities, as laid down in the DGA, do not provide for a sufficiently stringent vetting procedure applicable to such services. Therefore, the EDPB and EDPS recommend exploring alternative procedures that foresee a more systematic inclusion of accountability tools, in particular the adherence to a code of conduct or certification mechanism.

The joint opinion also includes recommendations on the designation of the supervisory authorities as main competent authorities for the control of the compliance with the DGA provisions, in consultation with other relevant sectorial authorities.

______________________________________
[1] See Explanatory Memorandum of the Proposal, page 1

Note to editors:  Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2021_02

03 February 2021

EROD przyjmuje zalecenia w sprawie art. 36 dyrektywy o ochronie danych w sprawach karnych dotyczące odpowiedniego stopnia ochrony przekazywanych danych osobowych, opinię na temat porozumienia administracyjnego między H3C/PCAOB, wydaje oświadczenie w sprawie projektu przepisów dotyczących protokołu do konwencji o cyberprzestępczości, udziela odpowiedzi na kwestionariusz Komisji Europejskiej dotyczący przetwarzania danych osobowych do celów badań naukowych oraz dyskutuje o polityce ochrony prywatności aplikacji WhatsApp

Bruksela, dnia 3 lutego – podczas 45. posiedzenia plenarnego EROD przyjęła szeroki wachlarz dokumentów. Rada omówiła także zaktualizowaną politykę ochrony prywatności Whatsapp.

EROD przyjęła zalecenia w sprawie odpowiedniego stopnia ochrony przekazywanych danych osobowych na mocy dyrektywy o ochronie danych w sprawach karnych. EROD zapewnia spójne stosowanie unijnych przepisów o ochronie danych w UE, w tym dyrektywy o ochronie danych w sprawach karnych, która dotyczy przetwarzania danych osobowych do celów egzekwowania prawa. Celem zaleceń jest przedstawienie wykazu elementów, które należy przeanalizować podczas sporządzania oceny, na podstawie dyrektywy, odpowiedniości stopnia ochrony danych przekazywanych przez państwo trzecie. W dokumencie przypomina się o koncepcji i proceduralnych aspektach odpowiedniości stopnia ochrony danych zgodnie z dyrektywą i orzecznictwem TSUE oraz określa się unijne standardy ochrony danych w odniesieniu do współpracy policyjnej i sądowej w sprawach karnych.

EROD przyjęła opinię dotyczącą projektu porozumienia administracyjnego w sprawie przekazywania danych osobowych między Wysoką Radą Biegłych Rewidentów (fr. Haut Conseil du Commissariat aux Comptes) (H3C) a Radą Nadzoru nad Rachunkowością Spółek Publicznych (PCAOB). Porozumienie administracyjne zostanie przedłożone francuskiemu organowi nadzorczemu do zatwierdzenia na szczeblu krajowym. Francuski organ nadzorczy będzie monitorował stosowanie porozumienia administracyjnego w praktyce i, w razie konieczności, zawieszał wszelkie przekazywanie danych dokonywane przez H3C, jeżeli porozumienie administracyjne przestanie zapewniać osobom, których dane dotyczą, zasadniczo równoważny poziom ochrony.

EROD przyjęła oświadczenie w sprawie projektu przepisów dotyczących protokołu do konwencji o cyberprzestępczości. Oświadczenie to uzupełnia wkład EROD w projekt drugiego protokołu dodatkowego do Konwencji Rady Europy o cyberprzestępczości (konwencji budapeszteńskiej) i jest następstwem publikacji nowego projektu przepisów.

W oświadczeniu tym EROD przypomina, że obecnie omawiane przepisy mogą mieć wpływ na warunki dostępu do danych osobowych w UE do celów egzekwowania prawa, i wzywa do uważnej analizy toczących się negocjacji prowadzonych przez odpowiednie instytucje unijne i krajowe. Ponadto EROD podkreśla potrzebę zagwarantowania pełnej spójności z dorobkiem prawnym UE w dziedzinie ochrony danych osobowych.

EROD przyjęła swoją odpowiedź na kwestionariusz Komisji Europejskiej dotyczący przetwarzania danych osobowych do celów badań naukowych, ze szczególnym uwzględnieniem badań związanych ze zdrowiem. Odpowiedzi udzielone przez EROD są jej wstępnym stanowiskiem w tej kwestii i mają na celu zapewnienie jasności co do stosowania RODO w odniesieniu do badań naukowych w dziedzinie zdrowia. EROD opracowuje obecnie wytyczne dotyczące przetwarzania danych osobowych do celów badań naukowych, w których kwestie te zostaną szczegółowo omówione.

Ponadto członkowie Rady wymienili poglądy na temat niedawnej aktualizacji polityki ochrony prywatności aplikacji WhatsApp. EROD będzie kontynuował ułatwianie wymiany informacji między organami, aby zapewnić spójne stosowanie przepisów o ochronie danych w całej UE zgodnie ze swoim mandatem.

 

Informacje dla redaktorów:
Uwaga – wszystkie dokumenty przyjęte podczas posiedzenia plenarnego EROD podlegają niezbędnym kontrolom pod względem prawnym, językowym i pod względem formatowania i będą udostępniane na stronie internetowej EROD po zakończeniu tych kontroli.

EDPB_Press Release_2021_1

18 January 2021

The EDPB adopted guidelines on examples regarding data breach notification. These guidelines complement the WP 29 guidance on data breach notification by introducing more practice orientated guidance and recommendations. They aim to help data controllers in deciding how to handle data breaches and what factors to consider during risk assessment. The guidelines contain an inventory of data breach notification cases deemed most common by the national supervisory authorities (SAs), such as ransomware attacks; data exfiltration attacks; and lost or stolen devices and paper documents. Per case category, the guidelines present the most typical good or bad practices, advice on how risks should be identified and assessed, highlight the factors that should be given particular consideration, as well as inform in which cases the controller should notify the SA and/or notify the data subjects. The guidelines will be submitted for public consultation for a period of six weeks.

 

The guidelines and more information about the public consultation are available here

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2021_02

 

15 January 2021

Bruksela, 15 stycznia — EROD i EIOD (Europejska Rada Ochrony Danych i Europejski Inspektor Ochrony Danych) przyjęli wspólne opinie w sprawie dwóch zestawów standardowych klauzul umownych. Jedna opinia dotyczy SKU w odniesieniu do umów między administratorami a podmiotami przetwarzającymi, a druga – SKU dotyczących przekazywania danych osobowych do państw trzecich.

SKU między administratorami a podmiotami przetwarzającymi będą miały ogólnounijny skutek, a ich celem będzie zapewnienie pełnej harmonizacji i pewności prawa w całej UE w odniesieniu do umów między administratorami a podmiotami przetwarzającymi.

Andrea Jelinek, przewodnicząca EROD, oświadczyła: „EROD i EIOD z zadowoleniem przyjmują SKU między administratorami a podmiotami przetwarzającymi jako jedno, silne i ogólnounijne narzędzie rozliczalności, które ułatwi przestrzeganie zarówno przepisów RODO, jak i rozporządzenia 208/1725[1]. EROD i EIOD zwracają się między innymi o zapewnienie stronom wystarczającej jasności co do sytuacji, w których mogą one polegać na tych SKU, oraz podkreślają, że nie należy wykluczać sytuacji związanych z przekazywaniem danych poza UE”.

Poproszono o wprowadzenie kilku poprawek w celu zapewnienia większej jasności tekstu i jego praktycznej użyteczności w codziennej działalności administratorów i podmiotów przetwarzających. Poprawki te dotyczą wzajemnych zależności między przedmiotowymi dwoma dokumentami, tzw. „klauzuli dokowania”, która umożliwia dodatkowym podmiotom przystąpienie do SKU, oraz innych aspektów związanych z obowiązkami podmiotów przetwarzających. EROD i EIOD sugerują ponadto, by załączniki do SKU w możliwie największym stopniu wyjaśniały role i obowiązki każdej ze stron w odniesieniu do każdej czynności przetwarzania – wszelkie niejasności utrudniłyby administratorom lub podmiotom przetwarzającym wypełnianie ich obowiązków wynikających z zasady rozliczalności.

Wojciech Wiewiórowski, EIOD, powiedział: „Jesteśmy przekonani, że te SKU mogą ułatwić administratorom i podmiotom przetwarzającym wypełnianie ich obowiązków, wynikających zarówno z RODO, jak i z ram prawnych instytucji i organów UE. Mamy ponadto nadzieję, że te SKU zapewnią dalszą harmonizację i pewność prawa dla osób fizycznych i ich danych osobowych. Właśnie w tym kontekście dążymy do tego, by dokumenty te utrzymały jak najbardziej swoją aktualność w przyszłości”.

Projekty SKU dotyczących przekazywania danych osobowych do państw trzecich zgodnie z art. 46 ust. 2 lit. c) RODO zastąpią istniejące SKU w odniesieniu do międzynarodowego przekazywania danych, które to SKU przyjęto na podstawie dyrektywy 95/46 i które należało zaktualizować, aby dostosować je do wymogów RODO, uwzględnić wyrok TSUE w sprawie Schrems II, a także lepiej odzwierciedlić powszechne stosowanie nowych, bardziej złożonych operacji przetwarzania danych, często z udziałem wielu podmiotów odbierających i podmiotów przekazujących dane. W szczególności nowe SKU zawierają bardziej szczegółowe zabezpieczenia na wypadek, gdyby przepisy państwa przeznaczenia miały wpływ na przestrzeganie klauzul, w szczególności w przypadku wiążących wniosków organów publicznych o ujawnienie danych osobowych.

Wojciech Wiewiórowski, EIOD, powiedział: „Biorąc pod uwagę nasze praktyczne doświadczenia, sformułowaliśmy te uwagi w celu ulepszenia przedmiotowych SKU, tak aby w pełni zagwarantować, że dane osobowe obywateli UE będą miały merytorycznie równoważny stopień ochrony w przypadku przekazywania ich do państw trzecich. Wierzymy, że wspomniane sugestie i poprawki mają kluczowe znaczenie dla osiągnięcia tych celów w praktyce”.

Ogólnie rzecz ujmując, EROD i EIOD są zdania, że projekty SKU zapewniają wyższy stopień ochrony osób, których dane dotyczą. W szczególności EROD i EIOD z zadowoleniem przyjmują szczegółowe przepisy mające na celu rozwiązanie niektórych głównych problemów wskazanych w wyroku w sprawie Schrems II. Niemniej jednak EROD i EIOD są zdania, że można poprawić lub doprecyzować niektóre postanowienia, takie jak zakres SKU; niektóre prawa beneficjentów będących stronami trzecimi; niektóre obowiązki dotyczące dalszego przekazywania danych; aspekty oceny przepisów prawa państwa trzeciego dotyczących dostępu organów publicznych do danych publicznych oraz powiadamianie organu nadzorczego.

Przewodnicząca EROD Andrea Jelinek dodała: „Warunki, na jakich można stosować SKU, muszą być jasne dla organizacji, a osobom, których dane dotyczą, należy zapewnić skuteczne prawa i środki ochrony prawnej. SKU powinny też zawierać jasny podział ról i odpowiedzialności między stronami. Jeżeli chodzi o potrzebę, w niektórych przypadkach, wprowadzenia środków uzupełniających ad hoc w celu zapewnienia osobom, których dane dotyczą, stopnia ochrony merytorycznie równoważnego temu gwarantowanemu w UE, nowe SKU będą musiały być stosowane wraz z Zaleceniami EROD dotyczącymi środków uzupełniających”.

EROD i EIOD proszą Komisję o odniesienie się do ostatecznej wersji Zaleceń EROD dotyczących środków uzupełniających, jeżeli ostateczna wersja zaleceń zostanie przyjęta przed podjęciem przez Komisję decyzji w sprawie SKU. Dokument ten został przedłożony do konsultacji publicznych trwających do 21 grudnia 2020 r. i nadal podlega ewentualnym dalszym zmianom na podstawie wyników tych konsultacji.

 

Informacje dla redaktorów:
Uwaga – wszystkie dokumenty przyjęte podczas posiedzenia plenarnego EROD podlegają niezbędnym kontrolom pod względem prawnym, językowym i pod względem formatowania i będą udostępniane na stronie internetowej EROD po zakończeniu tych kontroli.

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2021_01