Comité Européen de la Protection des Données

EDPB News

16 April 2021

The two EDPB opinions on the European Commission draft Implementing Decisions on the adequate protection of personal data in the United Kingdom have now been published on the EDPB website.

Opinion 14/2021 is based on the GDPR and assesses both general data protection aspects and government access to personal data transferred from the EEA for the purposes of law enforcement and national security included in the draft adequacy decision.

Opinion 15/2021 is based on the Law Enforcement Directive (LED) and analyses the draft adequacy decision in the light of Recommendations 01/2021 on the adequacy referential under the Law Enforcement Directive, as well as the relevant case law reflected in Recommendations 02/2020 on the European Essential Guarantees for surveillance measures. This is the first draft implementing decision on a third country’s adequacy under the LED ever presented by the European Commission and assessed by the EDPB.

14 April 2021

Opinions on draft UK adequacy decisions, Guidelines on the application of Article 65(1)(a) GDPR, Guidelines on the targeting of social media users and Statement on international agreements including transfers

During its plenary session, the EDPB adopted two Opinions on the draft UK adequacy decisions. Opinion 14/2021 is based on the GDPR and assesses both general data protection aspects and government access to personal data transferred from the EEA for the purposes of law enforcement and national security included in the draft adequacy decision. This assessment is based on the GDPR Adequacy Referential WP254. Opinion 15/2021 is based on the Law Enforcement Directive (LED) and analyses the draft adequacy decision in the light of Recommendations 01/2021 on the adequacy referential under the Law Enforcement Directive, as well as the relevant case law reflected in Recommendations 02/2020 on the European Essential Guarantees for surveillance measures. This is the first draft implementing decision on a third country’s adequacy under the LED ever presented by the European Commission and assessed by the EDPB. 

The EDPB notes that there are key areas of strong alignment between the EU and the UK data protection frameworks on certain core provisions such as: grounds for lawful and fair processing for legitimate purposes; purpose limitation; data quality and proportionality; data retention, security and confidentiality; transparency; special categories of data; and on automated decision making and profiling.

EDPB Chair, Andrea Jelinek said: "The UK data protection framework is largely based on the EU data protection framework. The UK Data Protection Act 2018 further specifies the application of the GDPR in UK law, in addition to transposing the LED, as well as granting powers and imposing duties on the national data protection supervisory authority, the ICO. Therefore, the EDPB recognises that the UK has mirrored, for the most part, the GDPR and LED in its data protection framework and when analysing its law and practice, the EDPB identified many aspects to be essentially equivalent. However, whilst laws can evolve, this alignment should be maintained. So we welcome the Commission's decision to limit the granted adequacy in time and the intention to closely monitor developments in the UK.”

The EDPB underlines that several items should be further assessed and/or closely monitored by the European Commission in its decision based on the GDPR, such as: 

  • Immigration Exemption and its consequences on restrictions on data subject rights;
  • The application of restrictions to onward transfers of EEA personal data transferred to the UK, on the basis of, for instance, future adequacy decisions adopted by the UK, international agreements concluded between the UK and third countries, or derogations.

Regarding access by public authorities for national security purposes to personal data transferred to the UK, the EDPB welcomes the establishment of the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (IPT) to address the challenges of redress in the area of national security, and the introduction of Judicial Commissioners in the Investigatory Powers Act (IPA) 2016 to ensure better oversight in that same field. The EDPB still identifies a number of points requiring further clarifications and/or monitoring: 

  • Bulk interceptions;
  • Independent assessment and oversight of the use of automated processing tools;
  • Safeguards provided under UK law when it comes to overseas disclosure, in particular in light of the application of national security exemptions.

The Board adopted Guidelines on the application of Article 65(1)(a) GDPR to delineate the main stages of the procedure and clarify the competence of the EDPB when adopting a legally binding decision on the basis of Article 65(1)(a) GDPR. The Guidelines also include a description of the applicable procedural safeguards and remedies. The guidelines will be subject to public consultation for a period of six weeks.

The EDPB adopted a final version of the Guidelines on the targeting of social media users following public consultation. The aim of the Guidelines is to clarify the roles and responsibilities of social media providers and targeted individuals. The final version integrates updated wording in order to address comments and feedback received during the public consultation.

The EDPB adopted a Statement on international agreements including transfers. The EDPB invites EU Member States to assess and, where necessary, review their international agreements that involve international transfers of personal data and which were concluded before 24 May 2016 (for those relevant to the GDPR) and 6 May 2016 (for those relevant to the LED) to align them, where necessary, with EU data protection law. 

The agenda of the forty-eighth plenary is available here.

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2021_03

12 April 2021

On April 13th, the EDPB will hold its 48th plenary session. The agenda for the 48th plenary is available here

 

 

06 April 2021

The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) and the European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS) adopted a joint opinion on the Proposals for a Digital Green Certificate. The Digital Green Certificate aims to facilitate the exercise of the right to free movement within the EU during the COVID-19 pandemic by establishing a common framework for the issuance, verification and acceptance of interoperable COVID-19 vaccination, testing and recovery certificates. 

With this Joint Opinion, the EDPB and the EDPS invite the co-legislators to ensure that the Digital Green Certificate is fully in line with EU personal data protection legislation. The data protection commissioners from all EU and European Economic Area countries highlight the need to mitigate the risks to fundamental rights of EU citizens and residents that may result from issuing the Digital Green Certificate, including its possible unintended secondary uses. The EDPB and the EDPS underline that the use of the Digital Green Certificate may not, in any way, result in direct or indirect discrimination of individuals, and must be fully in line with the fundamental principles of necessity, proportionality and effectiveness. Given the nature of the measures put forward by the Proposal, the EDPB and the EDPS consider that the introduction of the Digital Green Certificate should be accompanied by a comprehensive legal framework.

Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the EDPB, said: "A Digital Green Certificate that is accepted in all Member States can be a major step forward in re-starting travel across the EU. Any measure adopted at national or EU level that involves processing of personal data must respect the general principles of effectiveness, necessity and proportionality. Therefore, the EDPB and the EDPS recommend that any further use of the Digital Green Certificate by the Member States must have an appropriate legal basis in the Member States and all the necessary safeguards must be in place."

Wojciech Wiewiórowski, EDPS, said: It must be made clear that the Proposal does not allow for - and must not lead to - the creation of any sort of central database of personal data at EU level. In addition, it must be ensured that personal data is not processed any longer than what is strictly necessary and that access to and use of this data is not permitted once the pandemic has ended. I have always stressed that measures taken in the fight against COVID-19 are temporary and it is our duty to ensure that they are not here to stay after the crisis.”

In the current emergency situation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, the EDPB and the EDPS insist that the principles of effectiveness, necessity, proportionality and non-discrimination are upheld. The EDPB and the EDPS reiterate that, at the moment of writing, there seems to be little scientific evidence as to whether having received the COVID-19 vaccine (or having recovered from COVID-19) grants immunity, and, by extension, how long such immunity may last. But scientific evidence is growing daily.

Moreover, a number of factors are still unknown regarding the efficacy of the vaccination in reducing transmission. The Proposal should lay down clear and precise rules governing the scope and application of the Digital Green Certificate and impose appropriate safeguards. This will allow individuals, whose personal data is affected, to have sufficient guarantees that they will be protected, in an effective way, against the risk of potential discrimination.

The Proposal must expressly include that access to and subsequent use of individuals’ data by EU Member States once the pandemic has ended is not permitted. At the same time, the EDPB and the EDPS highlight that the application of the proposed Regulation must be strictly limited to the current COVID-19 crisis.

The Joint Opinion includes specific recommendations for further clarifications on the categories of data concerned by the Proposal, data storage, transparency obligations and identification of controllers and processors for the processing of personal data. 

Note to editors: Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2021_03

26 March 2021

On March 30th, the EDPB will hold its 47th plenary session. During the plenary, the EDPB will dicsuss the European Commission's proposal for Regulations on a Digital Green Certificate.

The agenda for the 47th plenary is available here

16 March 2021

Due to the high number of responses, the call for expression of interest is already closed.

On April 30, the EDPB is organising a remote stakeholder event on the topic "application of the GDPR to the processing of personal data for scientific research purposes”. Representatives from, among others, individual companies, sector organisations, NGOs, law firms and academia with an expertise on the field are welcome to express interest in attending.

In order to express your interest to participate in the event, please fill in this form.

Places will be allocated on a first come, first served basis, depending on availability. Nonetheless, the EDPB reserves the right to give precedence to specific stakeholders, in light of their relevance in the field. Selected participants will receive the confirmation of their registration in the event via e-mail.

Detailed information and the programme of the event will be available shortly.

As we would like to have a balanced and representative audience, participation will be limited to one participant per organisation.

When? 30 April 2021, from 10:00 - 16:00h CET

10 March 2021

The EDPB and EDPS adopted a joint opinion on the proposal for a Data Governance Act (DGA). The DGA aims to foster the availability of data by increasing trust in data intermediaries [1] and by strengthening data-sharing mechanisms across the EU. In particular, the DGA intends to promote the availability of public sector data for reuse, sharing of data among businesses and allowing personal data to be used with the help of a ‘personal data-sharing intermediary’. The DGA also seeks to enable the use of data for altruistic purposes.

The EDPB and the EDPS acknowledge the legitimate objective of the DGA to improve the conditions for data sharing in the internal market. At the same time, the protection of personal data is an essential and integral element for trust in the digital economy. With this joint opinion, the EDPB and the EDPS invite the co-legislators to ensure that the future DGA is fully in line with the EU personal data protection legislation, thus fostering trust in the digital economy and upholding the level of protection provided by EU law under the supervision of the EU Member States’ supervisory authorities.  

Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the EDPB, said:The EU's data protection legal framework does not stand in the way of developing the data economy. Quite the contrary, it enables it: trust in any kind of data sharing can only be achieved by respecting existing data protection legislation. The GDPR is the foundation on which the European data governance model must be built. That is why we underline the need to ensure consistency with the GDPR with regard to the competence of the supervisory authorities, the roles of the different actors involved, the legal basis for the processing of personal data, the necessary safeguards and the exercise of the rights of the data subjects.

Wojciech Wiewiórowski, EDPS, said:We understand the growing importance of data for the economy and society as outlined in the European Data Strategy. However, with “big data comes big responsibility”, therefore appropriate data protection safeguards must be put in place. The overarching framework for European data spaces should ensure that the data protection acquis is not affected.

The EDPB and EDPS consider that the EU legislator should ensure that the wording of the DGA clearly and unambiguously state that this act will not affect the level of protection of individuals’ personal data, nor will any rights and obligations set out in the data protection legislation be altered.  

Concerning the reuse of personal data held by public sector bodies, the EDPB and EDPS recommend aligning the DGA with the existing rules on the protection of personal data laid down in the GDPR and with the Open Data Directive. Furthermore, it should be clarified that the reuse of personal data held by public sector bodies may only be allowed if it is grounded in EU or Member State law. Such laws should include a list of clear compatible purposes for which further processing may be lawfully authorised or constitutes a necessary and proportionate measure in a democratic society to safeguard the objectives referred to in Article 23 of the GDPR. 

On data sharing service providers, the joint opinion highlights the need to ensure prior information and controls for individuals, taking into account the principles of data protection by design and by default, transparency and purpose limitation.  Furthermore, the modalities upon which such service providers would effectively assist individuals in exercising their rights as data subjects should be clarified. 

As for data altruism, the EDPB and the EDPS recommend that the DGA should better define the purposes of general interest of such “data altruism”. Data altruism should be organised in such a way that it allows individuals to easily give, but also, withdraw their consent. 

In light of the possible risks for data subjects when their personal data might be processed by data sharing service providers or data altruism organisations, the EDPB and EDPS consider that the declaratory registration regimes for these entities, as laid down in the DGA, do not provide for a sufficiently stringent vetting procedure applicable to such services. Therefore, the EDPB and EDPS recommend exploring alternative procedures that foresee a more systematic inclusion of accountability tools, in particular the adherence to a code of conduct or certification mechanism.

The joint opinion also includes recommendations on the designation of the supervisory authorities as main competent authorities for the control of the compliance with the DGA provisions, in consultation with other relevant sectorial authorities.

______________________________________
[1] See Explanatory Memorandum of the Proposal, page 1

Note to editors:  Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2021_02

10 March 2021

Le Comité européen de la protection des données adopte son programme de travail pour la période 2021-2022, une déclaration sur le règlement «vie privée et communications électroniques», des lignes directrices sur les assistants vocaux virtuels ainsi que des lignes directrices sur les véhicules connectés, et se penche sur l'adéquation du niveau de protection des données au Royaume-Uni.

Bruxelles, le 10 mars - Durant sa 46ème séance plénière, le Comité européen de la protection des données (EDPB) a adopté de nombreux documents et examiné les projets de décisions relatives à l'adéquation du niveau de protection des données au Royaume-Uni présentés par la Commission européenne.

L’EDPB a adopté son programme de travail sur deux ans pour la période 2021-2022, conformément à l’article 29 de son règlement intérieur. Ce programme s’inscrit dans le droit fil des priorités présentées dans la stratégie de l’EDPB pour la période 2021-2023 et mettra en pratique les objectifs stratégiques qu'il s’est fixés.

L'EDPB a adopté une déclaration sur le projet de règlement «vie privée et communications électroniques», dans laquelle il salue l’accord sur le mandat de négociation donné par le Conseil, qui constitue une étape positive sur la voie de la finalisation du règlement «vie privée et communications électroniques». L'EDPB rappelle que les autorités nationales qui contrôlent l’application du RGPD devraient être chargées de surveiller l’application des dispositions relatives à la protection de la vie privée du futur règlement «vie privée et communications électroniques» afin d’assurer une interprétation et une mise en œuvre harmonisées de ce règlement dans l’ensemble de l’UE et de garantir des conditions de concurrence équitables au sein du marché unique numérique.

Andrea Jelinek, présidente de l’EDPB, s’est exprimée en ces termes: «Le règlement "vie privée et communications électroniques" ne doit, en aucun cas, diminuer le niveau de protection garanti par l’actuelle directive "vie privée et communications électroniques". Il devrait compléter le RGPD en fournissant de solides garanties de confidentialité et de protection supplémentaires pour tous les types de communications électroniques.»

L'EDPB a adopté les lignes directrices sur les assistants vocaux virtuels. Ces lignes directrices visent à recenser quelques-unes des principales difficultés, en termes de conformité, liées aux assistants vocaux virtuels, ainsi qu’à formuler des recommandations sur la façon d’y remédier pour les parties prenantes concernées. Elles feront l’objet d’une consultation publique durant six semaines.

L'EDPB a adopté la version finale des lignes directrices sur les véhicules connectés à l’issue d’une consultation publique. Ces lignes directrices mettent l’accent sur le traitement des données à caractère personnel dans le cadre d’un usage non professionnel des véhicules connectés par les personnes concernées. La version finale comprend des formulations mises à jour ainsi que de nouvelles précisions devant répondre aux observations et aux retours d’information reçus au cours de la consultation publique.

L’EDPB s’est penché sur les projets de décisions relatives à l'adéquation du niveau de protection des données au Royaume-Uni présentés par la Commission européenne. Il va procéder à un examen approfondi de ces projets de décisions, en tenant compte de l’importance de garantir la continuité et un niveau de protection élevé pour les transferts de données depuis l’UE.

Enfin, l’EDPB a adopté un avis conjoint de l’EDPB et du Contrôleur européen de la protection des données (CEPD) concernant l’acte sur la gouvernance des données. Un communiqué de presse distinct sera publié à ce sujet dans le courant de la journée.

Note à l’attention des rédacteurs:
Veuillez noter que tous les documents adoptés dans le cadre de la séance plénière de l’EDPB font l'objet des contrôles juridiques, linguistiques et de formatage nécessaires et qu'ils seront publiés sur le site web de l’EDPB une fois ces contrôles effectués.

EDPB_Press Release_2021_02

03 February 2021

Le CEPD adopte des recommandations sur l'article 36 de la directive en matière de protection des données dans le domaine répressif (critères de référence pour l’adéquation), un avis sur l'arrangement administratif entre le H3C et le PCAOB, une déclaration sur les nouveaux projets de dispositions pour un protocole à la convention sur la cybercriminalité et une réponse au questionnaire de la Commission européenne sur le traitement des données à caractère personnel à des fins de recherche scientifique, et mène une discussion sur la politique de Whatsapp en matière de protection de la vie privée

Bruxelles, le 3 février - Lors de sa 45e séance plénière, le CEPD a adopté une série documents. Le comité a, en outre, discuté de la mise à jour de la politique de Whatsapp en matière de protection de la vie privée.

Le CEPD a adopté des recommandations sur les critères de référence pour l’adéquation aux fins de la directive en matière de protection des données dans le domaine répressif. Le CEPD assure l'application cohérente de la législation de l’UE en matière de protection des données dans l'Union européenne, y compris la directive en matière de protection des données dans le domaine répressif, qui concerne le traitement des données à caractère personnel à des fins répressives. L'objectif des recommandations est de fournir une liste d'éléments à examiner lors de l'évaluation de l'adéquation d'un pays tiers aux fins de ladite directive. Le document rappelle la notion d'adéquation et ses aspects procéduraux selon la directive en question et la jurisprudence de la CJUE, et fixe les normes de l'Union en matière de protection des données pour la coopération policière et judiciaire en matière pénale.

Le CEPD a adopté un avis sur le projet d’arrangement administratif pour les transferts de données à caractère personnel entre le Haut conseil du commissariat aux comptes (H3C) et la Commission de surveillance de la comptabilité des sociétés cotées en bourse (PCAOB) des États-Unis. Cet arrangement administratif sera soumis à l'autorité de contrôle française pour autorisation au niveau national. L’autorité de contrôle français surveillera l'application de l'arrangement administratif dans la pratique et, si nécessaire, suspendra tout transfert effectué par le H3C si l'arrangement administratif cesse de fournir aux personnes concernées un niveau de protection substantiellement équivalent.

Le CEPD a adopté une déclaration sur les projets de dispositions pour un protocole à la convention sur la cybercriminalité. Cette déclaration complète la contribution du CEPD au projet de deuxième protocole additionnel à la convention sur la cybercriminalité du Conseil de l’Europe (convention de Budapest), et fait suite à la publication des nouveaux projets de dispositions.

Dans cette déclaration, le CEPD rappelle que les dispositions qui font actuellement l’objet de discussions sont susceptibles d'affecter les conditions d'accès aux données à caractère personnel dans l'UE à des fins répressives et appelle à un examen minutieux des négociations en cours par les institutions européennes et nationales compétentes. En outre, le CEPD souligne la nécessité de garantir une cohérence totale avec l'acquis communautaire dans le domaine de la protection des données à caractère personnel. 

Le CEPD a adopté sa réponse au questionnaire de la Commission européenne sur le traitement de données à caractère personnel à des fins de recherche scientifique, en se concentrant sur la recherche liée à la santé. Les réponses fournies par le CEPD constituent une position préliminaire sur ce sujet et visent à apporter des éclaircissements quant à l'application du RGPD dans le domaine de la recherche scientifique en matière de santé. Le CEPD élabore actuellement des lignes directrices sur le traitement de données à caractère personnel à des fins de recherche scientifique, qui aborderont ces points en détail.

Enfin, les membres du comité ont procédé à un échange de vues sur la récente mise à jour de la politique de confidentialité de WhatsApp. Le CEPD continuera à faciliter cet échange d'informations entre les autorités, afin de garantir une application cohérente de la législation en matière de protection des données dans toute l'UE, conformément à son mandat.

 

Note à l'attention des rédacteurs:
Veuillez noter que tous les documents adoptés lors de la session plénière du comité européen de la protection des données font l’objet des contrôles juridiques, linguistiques et de formatage nécessaires, et seront publiés sur le site web du comité européen de la protection des données une fois ces contrôles effectués.

EDPB_Press Release_2021_1

18 January 2021

The EDPB adopted guidelines on examples regarding data breach notification. These guidelines complement the WP 29 guidance on data breach notification by introducing more practice orientated guidance and recommendations. They aim to help data controllers in deciding how to handle data breaches and what factors to consider during risk assessment. The guidelines contain an inventory of data breach notification cases deemed most common by the national supervisory authorities (SAs), such as ransomware attacks; data exfiltration attacks; and lost or stolen devices and paper documents. Per case category, the guidelines present the most typical good or bad practices, advice on how risks should be identified and assessed, highlight the factors that should be given particular consideration, as well as inform in which cases the controller should notify the SA and/or notify the data subjects. The guidelines will be submitted for public consultation for a period of six weeks.

 

The guidelines and more information about the public consultation are available here

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2021_02

 

15 January 2021

Bruxelles, le 15 janvier - Le comité européen de la protection des données et le contrôleur européen de la protection des données (CEPD) ont adopté des avis conjoints sur deux séries de clauses contractuelles types (CCT): un avis sur les CCT pour les contrats conclus entre les responsables du traitement et les sous-traitants et un avis sur les CCT pour le transfert de données à caractère personnel vers des pays tiers.

Les CCT responsables du traitement/sous-traitants auront un effet à l’échelle de l’UE et visent à garantir une harmonisation totale et la sécurité juridique dans l’ensemble de l’UE en ce qui concerne les contrats entre les responsables du traitement et leurs sous-traitants.

Andrea Jelinek, présidente du comité européen de la protection des données, a fait la déclaration suivante: «Le comité européen de la protection des données et le CEPD se félicitent des CCT responsables du traitement/sous-traitants en tant qu’outil de responsabilisation unique, solide et à l’échelle de l’UE, qui facilitera le respect des dispositions du RGPD et du RPDUE. Entre autres, le comité européen de la protection des données et le CEPD demandent que des précisions suffisantes soient fournies aux parties quant aux situations dans lesquelles elles peuvent s’appuyer sur ces CCT, et soulignent que les situations impliquant des transferts en dehors de l’UE ne devraient pas être exclues.»

Plusieurs modifications ont été demandées afin d’apporter plus de clarté au texte et d’en assurer l’utilité pratique dans les opérations quotidiennes des responsables du traitement et des sous-traitants. Ces modifications comprennent notamment l’interaction entre les deux documents, la clause dite «d’amarrage», qui permet à de nouvelles entités d’adhérer aux CCT, et d’autres aspects liés aux obligations des sous-traitants. En outre, le comité européen de la protection des données et le CEPD suggèrent que les annexes des CCT clarifient autant que possible les rôles et responsabilités de chacune des parties en ce qui concerne chaque activité de traitement - toute ambiguïté rendrait plus difficile pour les responsables du traitement ou les sous-traitants de remplir les obligations qui leur incombent en vertu du principe de responsabilité.

Wojciech Wiewiórowski, CEPD, a déclaré: «Nous sommes convaincus que ces CCT peuvent faciliter le respect par les responsables du traitement et les sous-traitants de leurs obligations, tant au titre du RGPD que du cadre juridique des institutions et organes de l’UE. En outre, nous espérons que ces CCT garantiront une plus grande harmonisation et une plus grande sécurité juridique pour les personnes et leurs données à caractère personnel. C’est dans ce contexte que nous entendons rendre ces documents aussi pérennes que possible.»

Les projets de CCT pour le transfert de données à caractère personnel vers des pays tiers conformément à l’article 46, paragraphe 2, point c), du RGPD remplaceront les CCT existantes pour les transferts internationaux qui ont été adoptées sur la base de la directive 95/46 et qui doivent être mises à jour afin de les mettre en conformité avec les exigences du RGPD, ainsi que pour tenir compte de l’arrêt «Schrems II» de la CJUE, et mieux refléter le recours généralisé à de nouvelles opérations de traitement plus complexes impliquant souvent de multiples importateurs et exportateurs de données. En particulier, les nouvelles CCT prévoient des garanties plus spécifiques dans le cas où les lois du pays de destination ont une incidence sur le respect des clauses, notamment en cas de demandes contraignantes de la part des pouvoirs publics en vue de la divulgation de données à caractère personnel.

Wojciech Wiewiórowski, CEPD, a ajouté: «Compte tenu de notre expérience pratique, nous avons formulé ces observations afin d’améliorer ces CCT en vue de garantir pleinement que les données à caractère personnel des citoyens de l’UE bénéficient d’un niveau de protection substantiellement équivalent lors de transferts vers des pays tiers. Nous pensons que ces suggestions et amendements sont essentiels pour atteindre ces objectifs dans la pratique.»

De manière générale, le comité européen de la protection des données et le CEPD sont d’avis que les projets de CCT présentent un niveau de protection renforcé pour les personnes concernées. Le comité européen de la protection des données et le CEPD saluent en particulier les dispositions spécifiques destinées à traiter certains des principaux problèmes recensés dans l’arrêt Schrems II. Néanmoins, le comité européen de la protection des données et le CEPD estiment que plusieurs dispositions pourraient être améliorées ou clarifiées, telles que le champ d’application des CCT; certains droits des tiers bénéficiaires; certaines obligations concernant les transferts ultérieurs; les aspects de l’évaluation de la législation des pays tiers relative à l’accès des pouvoirs publics aux données publiques; et la notification à l’autorité de contrôle.

Andrea Jelinek, présidente du comité européen de la protection des données, a ajouté: «Les conditions dans lesquelles les CCT peuvent être utilisées doivent être claires pour les organisations et les personnes concernées devraient disposer de droits et de voies de recours effectifs. En outre, les CCT devraient prévoir une répartition claire des rôles et du régime de responsabilité entre les parties. En ce qui concerne la nécessité, dans certains cas, de prendre des mesures supplémentaires ad hoc afin de garantir aux personnes concernées un niveau de protection substantiellement équivalent à celui garanti au sein de l’UE, les nouvelles CCT devront être utilisées en même temps que les recommandations du comité européen de la protection des données sur les mesures supplémentaires

Le comité européen de la protection des données et le CEPD invitent la Commission à se référer à la version finale des recommandations du comité européen de la protection des données sur les mesures supplémentaires, dans l’hypothèse où la version finale des recommandations serait adoptée avant la décision de la Commission sur les CCT. Ce document a été soumis à la consultation publique jusqu’au 21 décembre 2020 et fait encore l’objet d’éventuelles modifications supplémentaires sur la base des résultats de la consultation publique.

 

Note à l'attention des rédacteurs:  
Veuillez noter que tous les documents adoptés lors de la session plénière du comité européen de la protection des données font l’objet des contrôles juridiques, linguistiques et de formatage nécessaires, et seront publiés sur le site web du comité européen de la protection des données une fois ces contrôles effectués.

 

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2021_01