Europäischer Datenschutzausschuss

News

26 September 2018

Press release

European Data Protection Board - Third Plenary session: EU-Japan draft adequacy decision, DPIA lists, territorial scope and e-evidence.

Brussels, 26 September - On September 25th and 26th, the European Data Protection Authorities, assembled in the European Data Protection Board, met for their third plenary session. During the plenary a wide range of topics were discussed.

EU-Japan adequacy decision  

The Board Members discussed the EU-Japan draft adequacy decision which they received from Commissioner Věra Jourová and have been asked to provide an opinion on. The Board will now thoroughly review the draft decision. The Board is determined to take into account the wide-ranging impact of the draft adequacy decision, as well as the need to protect personal data in the EU.  

DPIA Lists

The EDPB reached an agreement on and adopted the 22 opinions establishing common criteria for Data Protection Impact Assessment (DPIA) lists. These lists form an important tool for the consistent application of the GDPR across the EU. DPIA is a process to help identify and mitigate data protection risks that could affect the rights and freedoms of individuals. To help clarify the types of processing which could require a DPIA, the GDPR calls for the national supervisory authorities to create and publish lists of types of operations that are likely to result in a high risk. The Board received 22 national lists with an overall of 260 different types of processing. The EDPB Chair, Andrea Jelinek said: “It has been an enormous task for the members of the Board as well as the EDPB Secretariat to examine all of these lists and to establish common criteria on what triggers a DPIA and what not. It was an excellent opportunity for the EDPB to test the possibilities and challenges of consistency in practice. The GDPR does not require full harmonisation or an 'EU list', but does require more consistency, which we have achieved in these 22 opinions by agreeing on a common view.”

The 22 opinions on the DPIA lists result from art 35.4 and art. 35.6 GDPR and are in line with earlier guidance established by the Article 29 Working Party.

Guidelines on territorial scope

The EDPB adopted new draft guidelines, which will help provide a common interpretation of the territorial scope of the GDPR and provide further clarification on the application of the GDPR in various situations, in particular where the data controller or processor is established outside of the EU, including on the designation of a representative. The guidelines will be subject to a public consultation.

E-evidence

The EDPB adopted an opinion on the new E-evidence regulation, proposed by the European Commission in April 2018. The Board stressed that the proposed new rules providing for the collection of electronic evidence should sufficiently safeguard the data protection rights of individuals and should be more consistent with EU data protection law.

Plenary generic picture
25 September 2018

On September 25 and 26, the European Data Protection Board's third plenary is taking place in Brussels. For further information, please consult the agenda.

Agenda of Third Plenary

23 August 2018

The General Data Protection Regulation five months on

Initiatives in the EU and international perspectives

25 October 2018

Rue de la Loi 170

2:30 pm

Side event by EDPS and EDPB

Register

Welcome from Giovanni Buttarelli, European Data Protection Supervisor

Introduction by Andrea Jelinek, Chair European Data Protection Board

Part 1    Initiatives in the EU - a new quality of cooperation

  • Helen Dixon, Irish Data Protection Commissioner

  • Cristina Angela Gulisano, Director Danish Data Protection Agency

  • Isabelle Vereecken, Head of the EDPB Secretariat

  • Questions by moderator to 3 panelists

At 15:15:

  • Keynote: Catherine De Bolle, Executive Director of Europol, The broader framework for EU data protection: a law enforcement perspective – TBC

  • Comments by the audience and questions to EDPB Members

    BREAK

    At 4.00 PM:

  • Keynote: Koen Lenaerts, President European Court of Justice - Accountability in a digitalized world: the Court’s role in enhancing data protection in the European Union

Part 2   International perspectives and cross-border cooperation

  • Bruno Gencarelli, Head of the International Data Flows and Protection Unit, European Commission

  • Professor Masao Horibe, Chairman Personal Information Protection Commission Japan 

  • Professor Danilo Doneda Instituto Brasiliense de Direito Público 

  • Felipe Harboe, Senator of the Republic of Chile

  • Ludmila Georgieva, Co-Chair HWP Cyber Issues, Co-Chair DAPIX (Data Protection), Perm Rep Austria - TBC

  • Questions by the moderator to the 5 panelists

  • Comments by the audience and questions to the panel

  • Wrap-up

     

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20 July 2018

Brussels, 19 July – An important innovation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is the new way in which the supervisory authorities of the Member States closely cooperate to ensure a consistent application as well as a consistent protection of individuals throughout the EU.

During its second plenary meeting on 4 and 5 July the EDPB discussed the consistency and the cooperation systems, sharing first experiences on the functioning of the One-Stop Shop mechanism, the performance of the Internal Market Information System (IMI), the challenges the authorities are facing and the type of questions received since 25 May. Most data protection authorities reported a substantial increase in complaints received. The first cross-border cases were initiated in IMI on 25 May. Currently, around 100 cross-border cases in IMI are under investigation.

The EDPB Chair Andrea Jelinek said: “Despite the sharp increase in the number of cases in the last month, the Members of the EDPB report that the workload is manageable for the moment, in large part thanks to a thorough preparation in the past two years by the Article 29 Data Protection Working Party. However, we should only expect the first results of the new procedures to deal with cross-border cases in a few months from now. To handle complaints lead supervisory authorities will have to carry out investigations, observe procedural rules, and coordinate and share information with other supervisory authorities. The GDPR sets specific deadlines for each phase of the procedure. All of this takes time. During this time, complainants are entitled to be kept informed on the state of play of a case. The GDPR does not offer a quick fix in case of a complaint but we are confident the procedures detailing the way in which the authorities work together are robust and efficient.”

Generic press release pictures
05 July 2018

Brussels, 5 July 2018 - The European data protection authorities, assembled in the European Data Protection Board (EDPB), met on the 4th and 5th of July for the EDPB’s second plenary meeting. During this meeting, the European Data Protection Authorities addressed a wide range of topics. 

Cooperation and constistency procedures – state of play

The EDPB discussed the consistency and the cooperation mechanisms, sharing experiences on the functioning of the One-Stop Shop mechanism, the performance of the Internal Market Information System (IMI), which serves as IT platform for exchanges on cross-border issues, the challenges the authorities are facing and the type of questions received since 25 May. Most data protection authorities reported a substantial increase of complaints received. The first cases were initiated in IMI on the 25th of May. Currently, around 30 cross-border complaints in IMI are under investigation. The EDPB Chair Andrea Jelinek said: “Despite the sharp increase in the number of cases in the last month, the Members of the EDPB report that the workload is manageable at the moment, in large part thanks to a thorough preparation of the WP29 in the past two years. The GDPR does not offer a quick fix in case of a complaint but we are confident the procedures detailing the way in which the authorities work together under the consistency mechanism are robust and efficient.”

ICANN

The EDPB adopted a letter addressed to the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), providing guidance to enable ICANN to develop a GDPR-compliant model for access to personal data processed in the context of WHOIS.

The letter addresses the issues of purpose specification, collection of “full WHOIS data”, registration of legal persons, logging of access to non-public WHOIS data, data retention and codes of conduct and accreditation.

The EDPB’s predecessor, WP29, has been offering guidance to ICANN on how to bring WHOIS in compliance with European data protection law since 2003.

The EDPB expects ICANN to develop and implement a WHOIS model which will enable legitimate uses by relevant stakeholders, such as law enforcement, of personal data concerning registrants in compliance with the GDPR, without leading to an unlimited publication of those data.

PSD2 Directive

The EDPB adopted a letter addressed to Sophie in’t Veld MEP regarding the revised Payments Services Directive (PSD2 Directive). In its reply to Sophie in’t Veld the EDPB sheds further light on ‘silent party data’ by Third Party Providers, the procedures with regard to giving and withdrawing consent, the Regulatory Technical Standards, the cooperation between banks and the European Commission, EDPS and WP29 and what remains to be done to close any remaining data protection gaps.

Privacy Shield

The US Ombudsperson responsible for handling national security complaints under the Privacy Shield, Ambassador Judith Garber, was invited to the plenary meeting of the EDPB for an exchange with the Board Members. The EDPB was particularly interested in the concerns addressed to the US by the EDPB’s predecessor WP29, especially the appointment of a permanent Ombudsperson, formal appointments to the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board (PCLOB), and the lack of additional information on the Ombudsperson mechanism and further declassification of the procedural rules, in particular on how the Ombudsperson interacts with the intelligence services.

The EDPB pointed out that the meeting with the Ombudsperson was interesting and collegial but did not provide a conclusive answer to these concerns and that these issues will remain on top of the agenda during the Second Annual Review (scheduled for October 2018). In addition, it calls for supplementary evidence to be given by the US authorities in order to address these concerns. Finally, the EDPB notes that the same concerns will be addressed by the European Court of Justice in cases that are already pending, and to which the EDPB offers to contribute its view, if invited by the CJEU.

Generic image for fintech
05 July 2018

The EDPB adopted a letter on behalf of the EDPB Chair addressed to Sophie in’t Veld MEP regarding the revised Payments Services Directive (PSD2 Directive). In its reply to Sophie in’t Veld the EDPB sheds further light on ‘silent party data’ by Third Party Providers, the procedures with regard to giving and withdrawing consent, the Regulatory Technical Standards, the cooperation between banks and the European Commission, EDPS and WP29 and what remains to be done to close any remaining data protection gaps.

ICANN generic letter image
05 July 2018

The EDPB adopted a letter on behalf of the EDPB Chair addressed to the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), providing guidance to enable ICANN to develop a GDPR-compliant model for access to personal data processed in the context of WHOIS.

The letter addresses the issues of purpose specification, collection of “full WHOIS data”, registration of legal persons, logging of access to non-public WHOIS data, data retention and codes of conduct and accreditation.

The EDPB’s predecessor, WP29, has been offering guidance to ICANN on how to bring WHOIS in compliance with European data protection law since 2003.

The EDPB expects ICANN to develop and implement a WHOIS model which will enable legitimate uses by relevant stakeholders, such as law enforcement, of personal data concerning registrants in compliance with the GDPR, without leading to an unlimited publication of those data.

Generic image of plenary
04 July 2018

On 4 and 5 July the second plenary of the European Data Protection Board is taking place in Brussels. Please consult the agenda for more information.

Generic IMI Picture
27 June 2018

It has been just a month ago that the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) entered into application, the long awaited revamp of the EU’s data protection rules. Under the GDPR, the supervisory authorities of the Member States closely cooperate to ensure a consistent application of the GDPR throughout the European Union, as well as consistent protection of individuals. They assist each other and coordinate decision-making in these cross-border data protection cases. Via the so-called consistency mechanism the European Data Protection Board issues opinions and takes binding decisions to arbitrate different positions on cross border cases between national data protection authorities.

IMI (Internal Market Information System) was chosen as the IT platform to support cooperation and consistency procedures under the GDPR. IMI helps public authorities across the EU to cooperate and exchange information. The GDPR is the 13th legal area supported by the system.

IMI has been developed by the European Commission’s DG GROW and was adapted to cater for the needs of the GDPR, in close cooperation with the Secretariat of the European Data Protection Board and the national supervisory authorities.

On 25 May, the first case was initiated in IMI, and shortly afterwards the supervisory authorities started to cooperate via the system. Currently, more than 30 cross-border cases are under investigation.

14 IMI modules, 19 forms and more than 10.000 data fields were put in place to address the needs of data protection authorities and the GDPR procedures. 

Generic picture derogation guidelines
30 May 2018

During its first plenary meeting, the EDPB adopted the final version of the Guidelines on derogations applicable to international transfers (art 49). The Article 29 Working Party conducted a public consultation on a draft of these guidelines. The EDPB took into consideration the replies received and integrated the appropriate changes into the adopted version. 

Guidelines 2/2018 on derogations of Article 49 under Regulation 2016/679

Generic picture certification guidelines
30 May 2018

During its first plenary meeting, the EDPB adopted a draft version of the Guidelines on certification. A public consultation is available for 6 weeks. If you are interested to contribute, please go to the “Public Consultations” section of our website or click the link bellow:

Public consultation: Guidelines 1/2018 on certification and identifying certification criteria in accordance with Articles 42 and 43 of the Regulation 2016/679

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28 May 2018

During its first plenary meeting of 25 May, the EDPB adopted a statement on the revision of the ePrivacy Regulation and its impact on the protection of individuals with regard to the privacy and confidentiality of their communications.

This statement includes a call for a swift adoption of the new ePrivacy Regulation and some suggestions on some specific issues relating to proposed amendments by the co-legislators.

EDPB Statement on ePrivacy

Generic picture Icann
27 May 2018

Der Europäische Datenschutzausschuss bestätigte während seiner ersten Plenarsitzung am 25. Mai die Erklärung der Artikel-29-Datenschutzgruppe zu ICANN/WHOIS.

Erklärung der Artikel-29-Datenschutzgruppe zur WHOIS-Datenbank

„Die Artikel-29-Datenschutzgruppe erkennt die wichtigen Funktionen des WHOIS-Dienstes an. 
 
Die Artikel-29-Datenschutzgruppe hat ICANN seit 2003 dahingehend beraten, wie WHOIS mit dem europäischen Datenschutzrecht in Einklang gebracht werden kann (die Stellungnahme der Datenschutzgruppe von 2003 kann hier eingesehen werden). Das Verfahren zur Einhaltung der Datenschutz-Grundverordnung scheint von ICANN im Laufe des Jahres 2017 formell eingeleitet worden zu sein, was ein Grund dafür sein könnte, dass Interessenträger wegen der Anwendung der Grundverordnung am 25. Mai 2018 besorgt sind.
 
Nach der Datenschutz-Grundverordnung dürfen weder nationale Aufsichtsbehörden noch der Europäische Datenschutzausschuss (die Artikel-29-Datenschutzgruppe wird am 25. Mai 2018 zum Europäischen Datenschutzausschuss) ein „Vollstreckungsmoratorium“ für individuelle Verantwortliche schaffen. Datenschutz ist ein Grundrecht jedes Einzelnen, der sich bei seiner nationalen Datenschutzbehörde jederzeit beschweren kann, wenn er seine Rechte im Rahmen der Datenschutz-Grundverordnung verletzt erachtet. 
 
Datenschutzbehörden können jedoch berücksichtigen, welche Maßnahmen bereits ergriffen wurden oder noch laufen, wenn sie nach Erhalt derartiger Beschwerden eine angemessene regulatorische Reaktion bestimmen.

Wie bereits in einem früheren Schriftwechsel mit ICANN zum Ausdruck gebracht wurde (einschließlich dieses Schreibens vom Dezember 2017 und dieses Schreibens vom April 2018), erwartet die Artikel-29-Datenschutzgruppe von ICANN, die Entwicklung und Umsetzung eines WHOIS-Modells, das im Einklang mit der Datenschutz-Grundverordnung die rechtmäßige Verwendung personenbezogener Registrantendaten durch relevanten Stakeholder wie etwa Strafverfolgungsbehörden ermöglicht, ohne zu einer uneingeschränkten Veröffentlichung dieser Daten zu führen.

Die Artikel-29-Datenschutzgruppe erkennt die jüngsten Anstrengungen von ICANN an, die Einhaltung des WHOIS-Systems zu gewährleisten. Die Datenschutzgruppe wird das weitere Vorgehen von ICANN weiterhin genau beobachten; ihre Mitglieder können mit ICANN weiter in Kontakt treten, um sicherzustellen, dass die gesetzlichen Anforderungen des EU-Datenschutzrechts ordnungsgemäß erfüllt werden.

Generic picture Plenary
25 May 2018

On 25 May 2018, the greatly anticipated General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) entered into application and its pre-decessor Directive 95/46/EC was repealed. On that date, the Article 29 Working Party, the body bringing together the independent data protection authorities, ceased to exist and was replaced by a new body: the European Data Protection Board or EDPB.

The Board is composed of the heads of national supervisory authorities and the European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS). The Board also includes a representative of the European Commission who, however, does not have a right to vote.

The Board’s primary role is to safeguard the consistent application of the GDPR, but it has additional competences. It advises the European Commission on, for example, the level of data protection offered by third countries. In addition, the Board promotes cooperation between the national supervisory authorities and plays a role in conciliation procedures for disputes between national supervisory authorities. In exercising its powers, the Board issues guidelines, recommendations and statements of best practice on myriad topics.

During its first plenary meeting on 25 May the Board elected its Chair and two Vice-Chairs. The EDPB Chair will lead the Board for the coming five years and will exert an important influence on data protection in Europe and beyond. The Chair’s role will be crucial for the success and effectiveness of the GDPR.

Generic picture Press release
25 May 2018

Transparency and awareness are two core principles of the Board. Therefore, following the first plenary meeting of the Board, the newly elected EDPB Chair will hold a press conference on 25 May at 12.30 in the Brussels Press Club (Rue Froissart 95, Brussels). The press conference will be broadcast in EbS: http://ec.europa.eu/avservices/ebs/live.cfm?page=2 

Generic picture Secretariat
25 May 2018

The European Data Protection Board needs to rely on an effective Secretariat to be able to effectively accomplish all the tasks it is required to carry out under the GDPR. The EDPB Secretariat is composed of legal experts, communication and IT officers and administrative staff.

This brand-new team has worked hard to make the launch of the EDPB possible.  They will, without a doubt, have busy months ahead to organise the meetings of the Board and answer questions on the Board’s tasks and responsibilities.   

 

Generic picture Press release
25 May 2018

Brüssel, 25. Mai – Heute fand die erste Plenarsitzung des Europäischen Datenschutzausschusses statt. Dieses neue unabhängige EU-Entscheidungsgremium mit Rechtspersönlichkeit wurde durch die Datenschutz-Grundverordnung geschaffen, die seit heute gilt. Der Europäische Datenschutzausschuss, Nachfolger der Artikel-29-Datenschutzgruppe, bringt den Europäischen Datenschutzbeauftragten und die Aufsichtsbehörden der Mitgliedstaaten zusammen, um eine einheitliche Anwendung der Datenschutz-Grundverordnung in der gesamten Europäischen Union sowie den konsequenten Schutz jedes Einzelnen sicherzustellen.  Zudem überwacht der Ausschuss die Umsetzung der Richtlinie für den Datenschutz bei Polizei und Justiz.

Andrea Jelinek, Vorsitzende des Europäischen Datenschutzausschusses: „Diese seit Langem erwarteten Rechtsvorschriften geben Einzelpersonen mehr Kontrolle über ihre personenbezogenen Daten und bieten ein einheitliches Regelwerk für alle, die in der EU personenbezogene Daten von natürlichen Personen verarbeiten. In einer Welt, in der Daten wie eine Währung gehandelt werden, wurden die Rechte des Einzelnen oft vernachlässigt oder sogar missachtet. Wir sollten die Tatsache nicht aus den Augen verlieren, dass personenbezogene Daten dem Menschen innewohnend sind. Ich bin davon überzeugt, dass die Datenschutz-Grundverordnung dem Einzelnen und den Aufsichtsbehörden die Mittel zur Verfügung stellt, um dieses Grundrecht effektiv zu schützen und durchzusetzen.“

„Die neuen Datenschutzanforderungen wurden oft auf das Risiko hoher Geldbußen reduziert, doch die Datenschutz-Grundverordnung ist viel mehr als das. Es geht darum, die Rechte des Einzelnen obenan zu stellen und die EU-Datenschutzvorschriften so auszubauen, dass sie effizienter und zukunftstauglich werden. Zugleich werden auch in Europa tätige Unternehmen von der Datenschutz-Grundverordnung profitieren, weil diese Rechtssicherheit schafft und es leichter macht, im gesamten Binnenmarkt agieren. Zudem wird die Einhaltung der Datenschutz-Grundverordnung zum guten Ruf eines Unternehmens beitragen. In unserer datengesteuerten Wirtschaft kann ein guter Ruf binnen weniger Tage zerstört sein, wenn die Menschen Zweifel haben, ob ein Unternehmen ihre Daten mit Sorgfalt behandelt.“

Abschließend hob Jelinek hervor, wie wichtig Zusammenarbeit für den Erfolg der Datenschutz-Grundverordnung ist: „Es ist von größter Wichtigkeit, dass wir als Europäischer Datenschutzausschuss mit vereinten Kräften für ein hohes und einheitliches Datenschutzniveau für jeden Einzelnen sorgen – ganz gleich, wo in der EU er ansässig ist. Außerdem werden wir das Bewusstsein für Datenschutzrechte in der Öffentlichkeit fördern. Der Europäische Datenschutzausschuss ist ein neu geschaffenes Entscheidungsgremium der EU mit einem neuen Lenkungs- und Kooperationsmodell und der Befugnis, verbindliche Entscheidungen zu treffen. Das ermöglicht uns, unserem Auftrag effizient nachzukommen, indem wir Leitlinien für die Auslegung der Datenschutz-Grundverordnung geben.“

Die Datenschutz-Grundverordnung ist ein neues europäisches Gesetz, das die Kontrolle des Einzelnen darüber stärkt, wie Menschen und Organisationen die personenbezogenen Daten verwenden und weitergeben. Sie gilt auch für Organisationen außerhalb Europas, die sich an Einzelpersonen in der EU richten oder deren Verhalten beobachten. Die Datenschutz-Grundverordnung ersetzt die EU-Datenschutzrichtlinie aus dem Jahr 1995 – einer Zeit, in der das Internet noch in den Anfängen steckte. Sie ersetzt ein Patchwork nationaler Rechtsvorschriften durch eine einzige EU-Verordnung mit dem Zweck, die Rechenschaftspflicht von Organisationen zu erhöhen, Einzelpersonen mehr Kontrolle über ihre eigenen Daten zu geben und die Rechtssicherheit für Unternehmen zu verbessern, um so Innovation und die künftige Entwicklung des digitalen Binnenmarkts zu fördern.  

Generic picture MoU
25 May 2018

A Memorandum of Understanding was signed between the European Data Protection Board (EDPB) and the European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS) during the first plenary meeting of the EDPB. This MoU outlines the way in which the EDPB and EDPS will cooperate.

Memorandum of Understanding

generic picture guidelines
25 May 2018

During its first plenary meeting the European Data Protection Board endorsed the GDPR related WP29 Guidelines(Corrigendum: In document nr 8 reference to the WP 259 has been replaced by the correct WP 244).

Generic picture Cocktail
24 May 2018

A new regulation and a new EU Body need to be celebrated! To do so, a cocktail reception took place on the 24th of May. Within the beautiful venue of the Bibliotheque Solvay in Brussels, Commissioner Vera Jourova, Jan Philipp Albrecht MEP, European Data Protection Supervisor Giovanni Buttarelli and WP29 Chair Andrea Jelinek held speeches looking back at the coming into application of the GDPR and the challenges ahead. Many of those who played an active role in the negotiations of the GDPR were present and proud to see the achievement of such a long process.