Europejska Rada Ochrony Danych

Aktualności EROD

20 November 2020

Brussels, 20 November - On November 19th, the EDPB met for its 42nd plenary session. During the plenary, the European Commission presented two new sets of draft Standard Contractual Clauses (SCCs) and the EDPB adopted a statement on the future ePrivacy Regulation.
 
The European Commission presented two draft SCCs: one set of SCCs for contracts between controllers and processors, and another one for data transfers outside the EU. The draft controller-processor SCCs are fully new and have been developed by the Commission in accordance with Art. 28 (7) GDPR and Art. 29 (7) of Regulation 2018/1725. These SCCs will have an EU-wide effect and aim to ensure full harmonisation and legal certainty across the EU when it comes to contracts between controllers and their processors. In addition, the Commission presented another set of SCCs for the transfer of personal data to third countries pursuant to Art. 46 (2) (c) GDPR. These SCCs will replace the existing SCCs for international transfers that were adopted on the basis of Directive 95/46 and needed to be updated to bring them in line with GDPR requirements, as well as with the CJEU’s ‘Schrems II’ ruling, and to better reflect the widespread use of new and more complex processing operations often involving multiple data importers and exporters. The Commission has requested a joint opinion from the EDPB and the EDPS on the implementing acts on both sets of SCCs.
 
EDPB Chair Andrea Jelinek said: “The new SCCs for the transfer of personal data to third countries have been highly anticipated, and it is important to point out that they are not a catch-all solution for data transfers post-Schrems II. While the updated SCCs are an important piece of the puzzle and a very important development, data exporters should still make the puzzle complete. The step-by-step approach of the EDPB recommendations on supplementary measures is necessary to bring the level of protection of the data transferred up to the EU standard of essential equivalence. Together with the EDPS, the Board will now thoroughly draft a joint opinion on the two sets of draft SCCs as invited by the European Commission.”
 
Recommendations 1/2020 on supplementary measures: During the plenary, the Members of the Board decided to extend the deadline for the public consultation on the Recommendations on measures that supplement transfer tools to ensure compliance with the EU level of protection of personal data from 30 November 2020 until 21 December 2020.

The EDPB adopted a statement on the future ePrivacy Regulation and the future role of supervisory authorities and the EDPB in this context. The EDPB expressed concerns about some new orientations of the discussions in the Council concerning the enforcement of the future ePrivacy Regulation, which could lead to fragmented supervision, procedural complexity and a lack of consistency and legal certainty for individuals and companies. The EDPB underlines that many of the provisions of the future ePrivacy Regulation concern processing of personal data and that many provisions of the GDPR and the ePrivacy Regulation are closely intertwined. Consistent interpretation and enforcement of both sets of rules, when covering personal data protection, would therefore be fulfilled in the most efficient way, if the enforcement of those parts of the ePrivacy Regulation and the GDPR would be entrusted to the same authority.
 
EDPB Chair Andrea Jelinek added: “The oversight of personal data processing activities under the ePrivacy Regulation should  be entrusted  to  the  same  national  authorities that are responsible for the enforcement of the GDPR. This will ensure a high level of data protection, guarantee a level playing field and ensure a harmonised interpretation and enforcement of the personal data processing elements of the ePrivacy Regulation across the EU.”
 
The EDPB also stressed the need to adopt the new Regulation as soon as possible.
 
The EDPB added that this statement is without prejudice to the Board’s previous positions, including its statement of March 2019 and May 2018 and reiterated that the future ePrivacy Regulation should under no circumstance lower the level of protection offered by the current ePrivacy Directive and should complement the GDPR by providing additional strong guarantees for confidentiality and protection of all types of electronic communications.

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_19

16 November 2020

***Registration has been closed***

On November 27, the EDPB is organising a remote stakeholder workshop on the topic of Legitimate Interest. Representatives from, among others, individual companies, sector organisations, NGOs, law firms and academia are welcome to express interest in attending.

Places will be allocated on a first come, first served basis, depending on availability. We will contact your organisation in case your registration has been successful.

Detailed information and the programme of the event will be available shortly.

As we would like to have a balanced and representative audience, participation will be limited to one participant per organisation.

When? November 27th 2020, from 10:00 - 16:00

11 November 2020

Brussels, 11 November - During its 41st plenary session, the EDPB adopted recommendations on measures that supplement transfer tools to ensure compliance with the EU level of protection of personal data, as well as recommendations on the European Essential Guarantees for surveillance measures. 

Both documents were adopted as a follow-up to the CJEU’s ‘Schrems II’ ruling. As a result of the ruling on July 16th, controllers  relying on Standard Contractual Clauses (SCCs) are required to verify, on a case-by-case basis and, where appropriate, in collaboration with the recipient of the data in the third country, if the law of the third country ensures a level of protection of the personal data transferred that is essentially equivalent to that guaranteed in the European Economic Area (EEA). The CJEU allowed exporters to add measures that are supplementary to the SCCs to ensure effective compliance with that level of protection where the safeguards contained in SCCs are not sufficient.   

The recommendations aim to assist controllers and processors acting as data exporters with their duty to identify and implement appropriate supplementary measures where they are needed to ensure an essentially equivalent level of protection to the data they transfer to third countries. In doing so, the EDPB seeks a consistent application of the GDPR and the Court’s ruling across the EEA. 

EDPB Chair, Andrea Jelinek said: “The EDPB is acutely aware of the impact of the Schrems II ruling on thousands of EU businesses and the important responsibility it places on data exporters. The EDPB hopes that these recommendations can help data exporters with identifying and implementing effective supplementary measures where they are needed. Our goal is to enable lawful transfers of personal data to third countries while guaranteeing that the data transferred is afforded a level of protection essentially equivalent to that guaranteed within the EEA.”  

The recommendations contain a roadmap of the steps data exporters must take to find out if they need to put in place supplementary measures to be able to transfer data outside the EEA in accordance with EU law, and help them identify those that could be effective. To assist data exporters, the recommendations also contain a non-exhaustive list of examples of supplementary measures and some of the conditions they would require to be effective. 

However, in the end data exporters are responsible for making the concrete assessment in the context of the transfer, the third country law and the transfer tool they are relying on. Data exporters must proceed with due diligence and document their process thoroughly, as they will be held accountable to the decisions they take on that basis, in line with the GDPR principle of accountability. Moreover, data exporters should know that it may not be possible to implement sufficient supplementary measures in every case.

The recommendations on the supplementary measures will be submitted to public consultation. They will be applicable immediately following their publication. 

In addition, the EDPB adopted recommendations on the European Essential Guarantees for surveillance measures. The recommendations on the European Essential Guarantees are complementary to the recommendations on supplementary measures. The European Essential Guarantees recommendations provide data exporters with elements to determine if the legal framework governing public authorities’ access to data for surveillance purposes in third countries can be regarded as a justifiable interference with the rights to privacy and the protection of personal data, and therefore as not impinging on the commitments of the Article 46 GDPR transfer tool the data exporter and importer rely on.

The Chair added: “The implications of the Schrems II judgment extend to all transfers to third countries. Therefore, there are no quick fixes, nor a one-size-fits-all solution for all transfers, as this would be ignoring the wide diversity of situations data exporters face. Data exporters will need to evaluate their data processing operations and transfers and take effective measures bearing in mind the legal order of the third countries to which they transfer or intend to transfer data.”

The EEA data protection supervisory authorities will continue coordinating their actions in the EDPB to ensure consistency in the application of EU data protection law. 

The agenda of the forty-first plenary is available here.

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_18

10 November 2020

Brussels, 10 November - During its 41st plenary session, the EDPB adopted by a 2/3 majority of its members its first dispute resolution decision on the basis of Art. 65 GDPR. The binding decision seeks to address the dispute arisen following a draft decision issued by the Irish SA as lead supervisory authority (LSA) regarding Twitter International Company and the subsequent relevant and reasoned objections (RROs) expressed by a number of concerned supervisory authorities (CSAs). 

The Irish SA issued the draft decision following an own-volition inquiry and investigations into Twitter International Company, after the company notified the Irish SA of a personal data breach on 8 January 2019. In May 2020, the Irish SA shared its draft decision with the CSAs in accordance with Art. 60 (3) GDPR. The CSAs then had four weeks to submit their RROs. Among others, the CSAs issued RROs on the infringements of the GDPR identified by the LSA, the role of Twitter International Company as the (sole) data controller, and the quantification of the proposed fine. 

As the LSA rejected the objections and/or considered they were not “relevant and reasoned”, it referred the matter to the EDPB in accordance with Art 60 (4) GDPR, thereby initiating the dispute resolution procedure. 

Following the submission by the LSA, the completeness of the file was assessed, resulting in the formal launch of the Art. 65 procedure on 8 September 2020. In compliance with Article 65 (3) GDPR and in conjunction with Article 11.4 of the EDPB Rules of Procedure, the default adoption timeline of one month was extended by a further month because of the complexity of the subject matter. 

On 9 November 2020, the EDPB adopted its binding decision and will shortly notify it formally to the Irish SA. 

The Irish SA shall adopt its final decision on the basis of the EDPB decision, which will be addressed to the controller, without undue delay and at the latest one month after the EDPB has notified its decision. The LSA and CSAs shall notify the EDPB of the date the final decision was notified to the controller. Following this notification, the EDPB will publish its decision on its website.

For further information see: Art. 65 FAQ

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_17

21 October 2020

Bruksela, 21 października - 20 października EROD spotkała się na 40. sesji plenarnej. Na sesji tej omówiono szeroki zakres zagadnień.

W następstwie konsultacji publicznych EROD przyjęła ostateczną wersję Wytycznych w sprawie uwzględniania ochrony danych w fazie projektowania oraz domyślnej ochrony danych. Wytyczne koncentrują się na obowiązku uwzględnienia ochrony danych w fazie projektowania oraz domyślnej ochrony danych zgodnie z art. 25 RODO. Podstawowym obowiązkiem, o którym mowa w art. 25, jest skuteczne wdrażanie zasad ochrony danych oraz praw i wolności osób, których dane dotyczą, w fazie projektowania i domyślnej ich ochrony. Oznacza to, że administratorzy muszą wdrożyć odpowiednie środki techniczne i organizacyjne oraz niezbędne zabezpieczenia mające na celu zapewnienie przestrzegania zasad ochrony danych w praktyce oraz ochronę praw i wolności podmiotów, których dane dotyczą. Ponadto administratorzy powinni być w stanie wykazać, że wdrożone środki są skuteczne.

Wytyczne zawierają również wskazówki dotyczące sposobów skutecznego wdrażania zasad ochrony danych określonych w art. 5 RODO, w ramach których wymieniono kluczowe elementy dotyczące ochrony danych w fazie projektowania i domyślnej ochrony danych, a także przykłady praktycznych rozwiązań. Zawierają one również zalecenia na temat tego, jak administratorzy, podmioty przetwarzające i producenci mogą współpracować, aby osiągnąć uwzględnienie ochrony danych w fazie projektowania oraz domyślną ochrony danych.

Ostateczna wersja wytycznych zawiera zaktualizowane brzmienie i dalsze uzasadnienie prawne w celu uwzględnienia uwag i informacji zwrotnych otrzymanych w trakcie konsultacji publicznych.

EROD postanowiła ustanowić ramy skoordynowanego egzekwowania prawa. Ramy te zapewniają strukturę do koordynowania powtarzających się corocznych działań organów nadzorczych EROD. Celem ram skoordynowanego egzekwowania prawa jest ułatwianie prowadzenia wspólnych działań w elastyczny i skoordynowany sposób, od wspólnych działań w zakresie podnoszenia świadomości i gromadzenia informacji, po kontrole egzekwowania prawa i wspólne postępowania. Celem powtarzających się corocznych skoordynowanych działań jest promowanie przestrzegania przepisów, umożliwianie osobom, których dane dotyczą, wykonywania swoich praw i podnoszenie świadomości.

EROD przyjęła pismo w odpowiedzi do Europejskiej Akademii Wolności Informacji i Ochrony Danych (niem. Europäische Akademie für Informationsfreiheit und Datenschutz) dotyczące konsekwencji artykułu 17 dyrektywy w sprawie prawa autorskiego dla ochrony danych, w szczególności w odniesieniu do filtrów udostępnianych treści (ang. upload filters). W tym piśmie EROD stwierdza, że wszelkie przetwarzanie danych osobowych do celów stosowania filtrów udostępnianych treści musi być proporcjonalne i niezbędne oraz że, w miarę możliwości, żadne dane osobowe nie powinny być przetwarzane przy wdrażaniu art. 17 dyrektywy w sprawie prawa autorskiego. W sytuacji, w której niezbędne będzie przetwarzanie danych osobowych, jak w przypadku mechanizmu dochodzenia roszczeń, dane te powinny jedynie dotyczyć danych niezbędnych do tego określonego celu, z jednoczesnym zastosowaniem wszystkich innych zasad RODO. Ponadto EROD podkreśliła, że prowadzi stałą wymianę informacji z Komisją Europejską w tym temacie i zasygnalizowała swoją gotowość do dalszej współpracy.

Uwaga dla redaktorów:
Wszystkie dokumenty przyjęte na sesji plenarnej EROD podlegają niezbędnym kontrolom pod względem prawnym, językowym i pod względem formatowania oraz zostaną udostępnione na stronie internetowej EROD po ich zakończeniu.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_16

12 October 2020

Bruksela, 12 października – Podczas 39. sesji plenarnej EROD przyjęła wytyczne dotyczące koncepcji mającego znaczenie dla sprawy i uzasadnionego sprzeciwu. Wytyczne te umożliwią jednolitą interpretację tej koncepcji, co pozwoli na usprawnienie w przyszłości procedur związanych z art. 65 RODO.

W ramach mechanizmu współpracy określonego przez RODO, organy nadzorcze mają obowiązek „wymieniania się wszelkimi stosownymi informacjami” oraz współpracy „w celu osiągnięcia porozumienia”. Zgodnie z art. 60 ust. 3 i 4 RODO wiodący organ nadzorczy jest zobowiązany do przedłożenia projektu decyzji organom nadzorczym, których sprawa dotyczy. Mogą one następnie zgłosić mający znaczenie dla sprawy i uzasadniony sprzeciw w określonych ramach czasowych. Po otrzymaniu mającego znaczenie dla sprawy i uzasadnionego sprzeciwu, wiodący organ nadzorczy może skorzystać z dwóch możliwości. Jeśli nie uwzględni mającego znaczenie dla sprawy i uzasadnionego sprzeciwu lub uzna, że zgłoszony sprzeciw nie ma znaczenia dla sprawy lub nie jest uzasadniony, przekazuje sprawę Radzie w ramach mechanizmu spójności (art. 65 RODO). Jeżeli natomiast wiodący organ nadzorczy uwzględni sprzeciw i wyda zmieniony projekt decyzji, organy nadzorcze, których sprawa dotyczy, mogą w terminie dwóch tygodni wyrazić mający znaczenie dla sprawy i uzasadniony sprzeciw wobec zmienionego projektu decyzji.

Wytyczne mają na celu ustalenie wspólnego rozumienia pojęcia „mający znaczenie dla sprawy i uzasadniony”, łącznie z tym, co powinno być brane pod uwagę przy ocenie, czy sprzeciw „jasno wskazuje wagę wynikającego z projektu decyzji ryzyka” (art. 4 ust. 24 RODO).

Uwaga dla redaktorów:

Wszystkie dokumenty przyjęte na sesji plenarnej EROD podlegają niezbędnym kontrolom pod względem prawnym, językowym i pod względem formatowania oraz zostaną udostępnione na stronie internetowej EROD po ich zakończeniu.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_15

04 September 2020

Bruksela, 3 września – Rada przyjęła wytyczne dotyczące koncepcji administratora i podmiotu przetwarzającego zawartych w RODO oraz wytyczne dotyczące selekcji docelowych użytkowników mediów społecznościowych (targeting). Dodatkowo EROD stworzyła grupę zadaniową ds. skarg wniesionych w następstwie wyroku TSUE w sprawie Schrems II oraz grupę zadaniową zajmującą się dodatkowymi środkami, które mogą być wymagane od podmiotów przekazujących dane i podmiotów odbierających dane w celu zapewnienia odpowiedniej ochrony przy przekazywaniu danych w świetle wyroku TSUE w sprawie Schrems II.

Rada przyjęła wytyczne dotyczące koncepcji administratora i podmiotu przetwarzającego zawartych w RODO. Od czasu rozpoczęcia stosowania RODO pojawiają się pytania, w jakim stopniu RODO zmieniło te pojęcia, zwłaszcza w odniesieniu do pojęcia współadministratorów (w rozumieniu art. 26 RODO oraz w następstwie kilku orzeczeń TSUE), a także obowiązków podmiotów przetwarzających (w szczególności art. 28 RODO) określonych w rozdziale IV RODO.

W marcu 2019 r. EROD wraz ze swoim Sekretariatem zorganizowała spotkanie dla zainteresowanych podmiotów, podczas którego wyraźnie wskazano konieczność opracowania bardziej praktycznych wskazówek i umożliwiono Radzie lepiej zrozumieć potrzeby i problemy w tym obszarze. Nowe wytyczne składają się z dwóch głównych części: w jednej wyjaśnia się różne pojęcia; w drugiej ujęto szczegółowe wskazówki dotyczące najważniejszych konsekwencji tych pojęć dla administratorów, podmiotów przetwarzających i współadministratorów. Wytyczne zawierają schemat blokowy przedstawiający kolejne praktyczne wskazówki. Wytyczne będą przedmiotem konsultacji publicznych.

EROD przyjęła wytyczne dotyczące selekcji docelowych użytkowników mediów społecznościowych (targeting). Wytyczne mają na celu przekazanie zainteresowanym podmiotom praktycznych wskazówek i zawierają szereg przykładów różnych sytuacji, tak aby zainteresowane podmioty mogły szybko rozpoznać „scenariusz” najbliższy praktyki targetowania, którą zamierzają stosować. Głównym celem wytycznych jest objaśnienie ról i zadań podmiotów prowadzących media społecznościowe i osób, do których one docierają. W tym kontekście wytyczne między innymi wskazują potencjalne zagrożenia dla swobód osób fizycznych, główne zaangażowane podmioty i ich role, stosowanie najważniejszych wymogów w zakresie ochrony danych, takich jak legalność i przejrzystość oraz ocena skutków dla ochrony danych, a także kluczowe elementy ustaleń między podmiotami prowadzącymi media społecznościowe a osobami, do których one docierają. Dodatkowo wytyczne skupiają się na różnych mechanizmach targetowania, przetwarzaniu specjalnych kategorii danych oraz obowiązku współadministratorów w zakresie wdrażania odpowiednich ustaleń na podstawie art. 26 RODO. Na sesji plenarnej wytyczne zostaną przekazane do konsultacji publicznych.

Rada stworzyła grupę zadaniową, która zajmie się skargami wniesionymi w następstwie wyroku TSUE w sprawie Schrems II. Do organów ochrony danych w EOG wniesiono łącznie 101 identycznych skarg przeciwko administratorom w państwach członkowskich EOG dotyczących korzystania przez nich z usług Google/Facebook związanych z przekazywaniem danych osobowych. W szczególności skarżący, reprezentowani przez organizację pozarządową NOYB, twierdzą, że Google i Facebook przekazują dane osobowe do USA na podstawie Tarczy Prywatności UE–USA lub standardowych klauzul umownych oraz że zgodnie z ostatnim wyrokiem TSUE w sprawie C-311/18 administrator nie jest w stanie zapewnić odpowiedniej ochrony danych osobowych skarżących. Grupa zadaniowa przeanalizuje tę kwestię przy zapewnieniu ścisłej współpracy między członkami Rady.

W następstwie orzeczenia TSUE w sprawie Schrems II oraz w uzupełnieniu dokumentu z najczęstszymi pytaniami przyjętego w dniu 23 lipca Rada utworzyła grupę zadaniową. Ta grupa zadaniowa przygotuje zalecenia, które pomogą administratorom i podmiotom przetwarzającym w wykonywaniu ich obowiązku polegającego na wskazywaniu i wdrażaniu odpowiednich środków dodatkowych w celu zapewnienia należytej ochrony przy przekazywaniu danych do państw trzecich.

Przewodnicząca EROD Andrea Jelinek: „EROD zdaje sobie sprawę, że orzeczenie Schrems II nakłada na administratorów ważne zadanie. Oprócz oświadczenia i dokumentu z najczęstszymi pytaniami, które wkrótce opublikujemy w następstwie tego wyroku, przygotujemy wytyczne mające pomóc administratorom i podmiotom przetwarzającym w wykonywaniu ich obowiązków podczas rozpoznawania i wdrażania odpowiednich środków dodatkowych o charakterze prawnym, technicznym i organizacyjnym, aby przestrzegać podstawowego standardu równoważności przy przekazywaniu danych osobowych do państw trzecich. Konsekwencje wyroku mają jednak szeroki zakres, a okoliczności przekazywania danych do państw trzecich są bardzo zróżnicowane. Dlatego nie ma jednego uniwersalnego i szybkiego rozwiązania. Każda organizacja będzie musiała ocenić prowadzone przez siebie operacje przetwarzania i przekazywania danych oraz przyjąć odpowiednie środki”.

Uwaga dla redaktorów:
Wszystkie dokumenty przyjęte na sesji plenarnej EROD podlegają niezbędnym kontrolom pod względem prawnym, językowym i pod względem formatowania oraz zostaną udostępnione na stronie internetowej EROD po ich zakończeniu.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_14

24 July 2020

Europejska Rada Ochrony Danych publikuje dokument z najczęstszymi pytaniami dotyczącymi wyroku Trybunału Sprawiedliwości Unii Europejskiej C-311/18 (Schrems II)

W następstwie wyroku Trybunału Sprawiedliwości Unii Europejskiej w sprawie C-311/18 – Data Protection Commissioner / Facebook Ireland Ltd i Maximillian Schrems, EROD przyjęła dokument z najczęstszymi pytaniami, w którym zawarła początkowe objaśnienia i wstępne wskazówki dla zainteresowanych podmiotów dotyczące stosowania instrumentów prawnych do przekazywania danych osobowych do państw trzecich, w tym do USA. Niniejszy dokument, wraz z dalszymi wskazówkami, będzie dopracowywany i uzupełniany w miarę czynionych przez EROD postępów w zakresie analizy i oceny wyroku Trybunału. 

Dokument z najczęstszymi pytaniami na temat wyroku Trybunału Sprawiedliwości Unii Europejskiej C-311/18 znajduje się tutaj.

EROD_Komunikat prasowy_oświadczenie_2020_06

23 July 2020

Bruksela, 23 lipca – w świetle zbliżającego się końca okresu przejściowego związanego z brexitem EROD przyjęła notę informacyjną przedstawiającą działania, które muszą być podjęte przez organy nadzorcze, podmioty posiadające zatwierdzone wiążące reguły korporacyjne oraz organizacje, których wiążące reguły korporacyjne są w toku rozpatrywania przez organ nadzorczy Zjednoczonego Królestwa  w celu zapewnienia, aby po upływie okresu przejściowego reguły te nadal mogły być stosowane jako obowiązujące narzędzie przekazywania danych. Ponieważ po zakończeniu okresu przejściowego organ nadzorczy Zjednoczonego Królestwa nie będzie się już kwalifikował jako właściwy organ nadzorczy na mocy RODO, decyzje o zatwierdzeniu podjęte przez organ nadzorczy Zjednoczonego Królestwa na mocy RODO nie będą już mieć skutków prawnych w EOG. Dodatkowo treść takich wiążących reguł korporacyjnych może wymagać zmiany przed końcem okresu przejściowego, ponieważ reguły te na ogół zawierają odesłania do porządku prawnego Zjednoczonego Królestwa. Dotyczy to również wiążących reguł korporacyjnych zatwierdzonych jeszcze na mocy dyrektywy 94/46/WE.

Podmioty posiadające wiążące reguły korporacyjne, dla których organ nadzorczy Zjednoczonego Królestwa jest wiodącym organem nadzorczym, muszą wprowadzić wszystkie uzgodnienia organizacyjne w celu ustalenia nowego wiodącego organu nadzorczego w sprawie wiążących reguł korporacyjnych w EOG. Zmiana wiodącego organu nadzorczego w sprawie wiążących reguł korporacyjnych musi nastąpić przed końcem okresu przejściowego związanego z brexitem.

Podmioty obecnie wnioskujące o zatwierdzenie wiążących reguł korporacyjnych zachęca się do wprowadzenia wszystkich uzgodnień organizacyjnych w celu ustalenia nowego wiodącego organu nadzorczego w sprawie wiążących reguł korporacyjnych w EOG z odpowiednim wyprzedzeniem przed końcem okresu przejściowego związanego z brexitem, w tym do skontaktowania się z danym organem nadzorczym w celu zapewnienia wszystkich niezbędnych informacji o tym, dlaczego dany organ nadzorczy został uznany za nowy wiodący organ nadzorczy w sprawie wiążących reguł korporacyjnych. Organ ten przejmie wniosek i formalnie rozpocznie procedurę zatwierdzenia, która jest przedmiotem opinii EROD. Wiążące reguły korporacyjne zatwierdzone przez organ nadzorczy Zjednoczonego Królestwa na mocy RODO będą zawierały wymóg, aby nowy wiodący organ nadzorczy w sprawie wiążących reguł korporacyjnych w EOG wydał nową decyzję zatwierdzającą przed końcem okresu przejściowego, po uzyskaniu opinii EROD. EROD przyjęła także załącznik zawierający listę kontrolną elementów, które należy zmienić w dokumentach dotyczących wiążących reguł korporacyjnych w kontekście brexitu.

Niniejsze nota informacyjna pozostaje bez uszczerbku dla analizy prowadzonej obecnie przez EROD w zakresie konsekwencji wyroku Trybunału Sprawiedliwości Unii Europejskiej w sprawie Data Protection Commissioner przeciwko Facebook Ireland i Maximillian Schrems dla wiążących reguł korporacyjnych jako narzędzi przekazywania danych.

EROD_Komunikat prasowy_2020_13

20 July 2020

Bruksela, 20 lipca – podczas 34. sesji plenarnej EROD przyjęła oświadczenie dotyczące wyroku Trybunału Sprawiedliwości Unii Europejskiej w sprawie Facebook Ireland i Schrems. Rada przyjęła wytyczne dotyczące relacji między drugą dyrektywą w sprawie usług płatniczych a RODO, a także pismo z odpowiedzią skierowane do posłanki do Parlamentu Europejskiego Lucii Ďuriš Nicholsonovej dotyczące ustalania kontaktów zakaźnych, interoperacyjności aplikacji i ocen skutków dla ochrony danych.

EROD przyjęła oświadczenie dotyczące wyroku Trybunału Sprawiedliwości Unii Europejskiej w sprawie C-311/18 – Data Protection Commissioner / Facebook Ireland i Maximillian Schrems, w którym stwierdzono nieważność decyzji 2016/1250 w sprawie adekwatności ochrony zapewnianej przez Tarczę Prywatności UE–USA oraz uznano, że decyzja Komisji 2010/87 w sprawie standardowych klauzul umownych dotyczących przekazywania danych osobowych podmiotom przetwarzającym dane mającym siedzibę w państwach trzecich jest ważna.

Jeśli chodzi o Tarczę Prywatności, EROD zwraca uwagę, że UE i Stany Zjednoczone powinny opracować kompletne i skuteczne ramy gwarantujące, że poziom ochrony danych osobowych w Stanach Zjednoczonych jest zasadniczo równoważny poziomowi gwarantowanemu w UE, zgodnie z wyrokiem. EROD zamierza nadal odgrywać konstruktywną rolę w zapewnianiu transatlantyckiego przekazywania danych osobowych, które przynosi korzyści obywatelom i organizacjom EOG, i jest gotowa zapewnić Komisji Europejskiej pomoc i wytyczne, aby pomóc jej opracowywać – wraz ze Stanami Zjednoczonymi – nowe ramy, które będą w pełni zgodne z unijnymi przepisami o ochronie danych.

Jeśli chodzi o standardowe klauzule umowne, EROD zwraca uwagę, że to przede wszystkim podmiot przekazujący dane i podmiot odbierający dane ponoszą odpowiedzialność przy podejmowaniu decyzji, czy przyjąć standardowe klauzule umowne, aby zagwarantować, że zapewniają one poziom ochrony będący zasadniczo równoważny poziomowi gwarantowanemu na podstawie RODO w świetle karty UE. Dokonując takiej oceny wstępnej podmiot przekazujący dane (w razie potrzeby z pomocą podmiotu odbierającego dane) bierze pod uwagę treść standardowych klauzul umownych, szczególne okoliczności przekazania danych, a także system prawny mający zastosowanie w państwie podmiotu odbierającego dane. Trybunał podkreśla, że podmiot przekazujący dane może być zmuszony rozważyć wprowadzenie dodatkowych środków oprócz środków zawartych w standardowych klauzulach umownych. EROD będzie w dalszym ciągu analizować, na czym miałyby polegać te dodatkowe środki.

EROD przyjmuje też do wiadomości obowiązki właściwych organów nadzorczych w zakresie zawieszenia lub zakazania przekazywania danych do państwa trzeciego na podstawie standardowych klauzul umownych, jeżeli – zdaniem właściwego organu nadzorczego i w świetle wszystkich okoliczności takiego przekazania – klauzule te nie zostały lub nie mogą być spełnione w tym państwie trzecim, a ochrony przekazywanych danych nie można zapewnić w ramach innych środków, zwłaszcza w przypadku gdy administrator lub podmiot przetwarzający sam już nie zawiesił lub nie zakończył przekazywania danych.

EROD przypomina, że przyjęła wytyczne w sprawie art. 49 RODO oraz że przewidziane w tym artykule wyjątki muszą być stosowane przy uwzględnieniu poszczególnych przypadków.

EROD dokona bardziej szczegółowej oceny wyroku i udzieli zainteresowanym stronom dalszych wyjaśnień i wskazówek dotyczących stosowania instrumentów przekazywania danych osobowych do państw trzecich zgodnie z wyrokiem. Jak stwierdził Trybunał Sprawiedliwości Unii Europejskiej, EROD i jej europejskie organy nadzorcze są też gotowe do zapewnienia spójności w całym EOG.

Pełna wersja oświadczenia jest dostępna tutaj: https://edpb.europa.eu/news/news/2020/statement-court-justice-european-union-judgment-case-c-31118-data-protection_en

EROD przyjęła wytyczne w sprawie drugiej dyrektywy w sprawie usług płatniczych. Drugą dyrektywą w sprawie usług płatniczych modernizuje się ramy prawne rynku usług płatniczych. Co ważne, wprowadza się ramy prawne nowych usług inicjowania płatności (PISP) oraz usług dostępu do informacji o rachunku (AISP). Użytkownicy mogą wnosić o to, aby podmioty świadczące te nowe usługi płatnicze uzyskały dostęp do ich rachunków płatniczych. Po warsztatach dla zainteresowanych stron, które odbyły się w lutym 2019 r., EROD opracowała wytyczne dotyczące stosowania RODO do tych nowych usług płatniczych.

W wytycznych podkreśla się, że w tym kontekście przetwarzanie szczególnych kategorii danych osobowych jest na ogół zabronione (zgodnie z art. 9 ust. 1 RODO), z wyjątkiem przypadków, gdy osoba, której dane dotyczą, wyraziła na to wyraźną zgodę (art. 9 ust. 2 lit. a) RODO) lub przetwarzanie jest niezbędne ze względów związanych z ważnym interesem publicznym (art. 9 ust. 2 lit. g) RODO).

Wytyczne odnoszą się też do warunków udzielania przez dostawców usług płatniczych prowadzących rachunki dostępu do informacji o rachunku płatniczym na potrzeby usług inicjowania płatności i usług dostępu do informacji o rachunku, zwłaszcza szczegółowego dostępu do rachunków płatniczych.

W wytycznych wyjaśnia się, że ani art. 66 ust. 3 lit. g) ani art. 67 ust. 2 lit. f) drugiej dyrektywy w sprawie usług płatniczych nie zezwalają na dalsze przetwarzanie danych, chyba że podmiot, którego dane dotyczą, udzielił na to zgody na podstawie art. 6 ust. 1 lit. a) RODO lub przetwarzanie takie jest przewidziane w prawie unijnym lub prawie państwa członkowskiego. Wytyczne zostaną przedłożone do konsultacji publicznych.

Ponadto Rada przyjęła pismo w odpowiedzi na pytania posłanki do Parlamentu Europejskiego Lucii Ďuriš Nicholsonovej dotyczące ochrony danych w kontekście walki z COVID-19. W piśmie tym odniesiono się do pytań dotyczących harmonizacji i interoperacyjności aplikacji służących do ustalania kontaktów zakaźnych, wymogu dokonania oceny skutków dla ochrony danych w odniesieniu do takiego przetwarzania danych oraz możliwego czasu przetwarzania danych.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_12

17 July 2020


The European Data Protection Board has adopted the following statement:


The EDPB welcomes the CJEU’s judgment, which highlights the fundamental right to privacy in the context of the transfer of personal data to third countries. The CJEU’s decision is one of great importance. The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) has taken note of the fact that the Court of Justice invalidates Decision 2016/1250 on the adequacy of the protection provided by the EU-US Privacy Shield, and of the fact that it considers Commission Decision 2010/87 on Standard Contractual Clauses (SCCs) for the transfer of personal data to processors established in third countries valid.


The EDPB discussed the Court’s ruling during its 34th plenary session of 17 July 2020.


With regard to the Privacy Shield, the EDPB points out that the EU and the U.S. should achieve a complete and effective framework guaranteeing that the level of protection granted to personal data in the U.S. is essentially equivalent to that guaranteed within the EU, in line with the judgment.


The EDPB identified in the past some of the main flaws of the Privacy Shield on which the CJEU grounds its decision to declare it invalid.


The EDPB questioned in its reports on the annual joint reviews of Privacy Shield the compliance with the data protection principles of necessity and proportionality in the application of U.S. law. (1)


The EDPB intends to continue playing a constructive part in securing a transatlantic transfer of personal data that benefits EEA citizens and organisations and stands ready to provide the European Commission with assistance and guidance to help it build, together with the U.S., a new framework that fully complies with EU data protection law.


While the SCCs remain valid, the CJEU underlines the need to ensure that these maintain, in practice, a level of protection that is essentially equivalent to the one guaranteed by the GDPR in light of the EU Charter. The assessment of whether the countries to which data are sent offer adequate protection is primarily the responsibility of the exporter and the importer, when considering whether to enter into SCCs. When performing such prior assessment, the exporter (if necessary, with the assistance of the importer) shall take into consideration the content of the SCCs, the specific circumstances of the transfer, as well as the legal regime applicable in the importer’s country. The examination of the latter shall be done in light of the non-exhaustive factors set out under Art 45(2) GDPR.


If the result of this assessment is that the country of the importer does not provide an essentially equivalent level of protection, the exporter may have to consider putting in place additional measures to those included in the SCCs. The EDPB is looking further into what these additional measures could consist of.


The CJEU’s judgment also recalls the importance for the exporter and importer to comply with their obligations included in the SCCs, in particular the information obligations in relation to change of legislation in the importer’s country. When those contractual obligations are not or cannot be complied with, the exporter is bound by the SCCs to suspend the transfer or terminate the SCCs or to notify its competent supervisory authority if it intends to continue transferring data.


The EDPB takes note of the duties for the competent supervisory authorities (SAs) to suspend or prohibit a transfer of data to a third country pursuant to SCCs, if, in the view of the competent SA and in the light of all the circumstances of that transfer, those clauses are not or cannot be complied with in that third country, and the protection of the data transferred cannot be ensured by other means, in particular where the controller or a processor has not already itself suspended or put an end to the transfer.


The EDPB recalls that it issued guidelines on Art 49 GDPR derogations (2); and that such derogations must be applied on a case-by-case basis.


The EDPB will assess the judgment in more detail and provide further clarification for stakeholders and guidance on the use of instruments for the transfer of personal data to third countries pursuant to the judgment.


The EDPB and its European SAs stand ready, as stated by the CJEU, to ensure consistency across the EEA.


For the European Data Protection Board


The Chair


(Andrea Jelinek)

 

(1) See EDPB, EU-U.S. Privacy Shield  - Second Annual Joint Review report here, and  EDPB, EU -U.S. Privacy Shield   - Third Annual Joint Review report here.

(2) DPB Guidelines 2/2018 on derogations of Article 49 under Regulation 2016/679, adopted on 25 May 2018, p3.

 

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2020_05

25 June 2020

The EDPB has published a new register containing decisions taken by national supervisory authorities following the One-Stop-Shop cooperation procedure (Art. 60 GDPR) on its website.


Under the GDPR, Supervisory Authorities have a duty to cooperate on cases with a cross-border component to ensure a consistent application of the regulation - the so-called one-stop-shop (OSS) mechanism. Under the OSS, the Lead Supervisory Authority (LSA) is in charge of preparing the draft decisions and works together with the concerned SAs to reach consensus. Up until early June, LSAs have adopted 110 final OSS decisions. The register includes access to the decisions as well as  summaries of the decisions in English prepared by the EDPB Secretariat. The register will be valuable to data protection practitioners who will gain access to information showcasing how SAs work together to enforce the GDPR in practice. The information in the register has been validated by the LSAs in question and in accordance with the conditions provided by its national legislation.

The register is accessible here

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2020_04

17 June 2020

During its 32nd plenary session, the EDPB adopted a statement on the interoperability of contact tracing apps, as well as a statement on the opening of borders and data protection rights. The Board also adopted two letters to MEP Körner - on encryption and on Article 25 GDPR - and a letter to CEAOB on PCAOB arrangements.

The EDPB adopted a statement on the interoperability of contact tracing applications, building on the EDPB Guidelines 04/2020 on the use of location data and contact tracing tools in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak. The statement offers a more in-depth analysis of key aspects, including transparency, legal basis, controllership, data subject rights, data retention and minimisation, information security and data accuracy in the context of creating an interoperable network of applications, that need to be considered on top of those highlighted in the EDPB Guidelines 04/2020.

The EDPB emphasises that the sharing of data about individuals that have been diagnosed or tested positively with such interoperable applications should only be triggered by a voluntary action of the user. Giving data subjects information and control will increase their trust in the solutions and their potential uptake. The goal of interoperability should not be used as an argument to extend the collection of personal data beyond what is necessary.

Moreover, contact tracing apps need to be part of a comprehensive public health strategy to fight the pandemic, such as testing and subsequent manual contact tracing for the purpose of improving effectiveness of the performed measures.

Ensuring interoperability is not only technically challenging and sometimes impossible without disproportionate trade-offs, but also leads to a potential increased data protection risk. Therefore, controllers need to ensure measures are effective and proportionate and must assess whether a less intrusive alternative can achieve the same purpose.

The EDPB adopted a statement on the processing of personal data in the context of reopening the Schengen borders following the COVID-19 outbreak. The measures allowing a safe reopening of the borders currently envisaged or implemented by Member States include testing for COVID-19, requiring certificates issued by health professionals and the use of a voluntary contact tracing app. Most measures involve processing of personal data.

The EDPB recalls that data protection legislation remains applicable and allows for an efficient response to the pandemic, while at the same time protecting fundamental rights and freedoms. The EDPB stresses that the processing of personal data must be necessary and proportionate, and the level of protection should be consistent throughout the EEA. In the statement, the EDPB urges the Member States to take a common European approach when deciding which processing of personal data is necessary in this context.

The statement also addresses the GDPR principles that Member States need to pay special attention to when processing personal data in the context of reopening the border. These include lawfulness, fairness and transparency, purpose limitation, data minimisation, storage limitation, security of data and data protection by design and by default. Moreover, the decision to allow the entrance into a country should not only be based on the automated individual decision making technologies. In any case, such decisions should be subject to suitable safeguards, which should include specific information to the data subject and the right to obtain human intervention, to express his or her point of view, to obtain an explanation of the decision reached after such assessment and to challenge the decision. Automated individual decision measures should not apply to children.

Finally, the EDPB highlights the importance of a prior consultation with competent national supervisory authorities when Member States intend to process personal data in this context.

The EDPB adopted a response to a letter from MEP Moritz Körner on the relevance of encryption bans in third countries for assessing the level of data protection when personal data are transferred to countries where these bans exist. According to the EDPB, any ban on encryption or provisions weakening encryption would seriously undermine compliance with GDPR security obligations applicable to controllers and processors, be that in a third country or in the EEA. Security measures are one of the elements the European Commission must take into account when assessing the adequacy of the level of protection in a third country.

A second letter to MEP Körner addresses the topic of laptop camera covers. MEP Körner highlighted that this technology could help comply with the GDPR and suggested new laptops should be equipped with it. In its reply, the Board clarifies that while laptop manufacturers should be encouraged to take into account the right to data protection when developing and designing such products, they are not responsible for the processing carried out with those products and the GDPR does not establish legal obligations for manufacturers, unless they also act as controllers or processors. Controllers must evaluate the risks of each processing and choose the appropriate safeguards to comply with GDPR, including the privacy by design and by default enshrined in Article 25 GDPR.

Finally, the EDPB adopted a letter to the Committee of European Auditor Oversight Bodies (CEAOB). The EDPB received a proposal from the CEAOB, which gathers the national auditor oversight bodies at EU level, to cooperate and receive feedback on negotiations of draft administrative arrangements for the transfer of data to the US Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB). The EDPB welcomes this proposal and indicates that it is available to hold an exchange with the CEAOB to clarify any potential questions on data protection requirements related to such arrangements in light of the EDPB Guidelines 2/2020 on Art. 46 (2) (a) and 46 (3) (b) GDPR for transfers of personal data between EEA and non-EEA public authorities. The exchange could also involve the PCAOB if the CEAOB and its members deem it beneficial for their work on these arrangements.

The agenda of the 32nd plenary is available here

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_11

10 June 2020

Bruksela, 10 czerwca – podczas 31. sesji plenarnej EROD postanowiła utworzyć grupę zadaniową w celu koordynowania potencjalnych działań oraz uzyskania bardziej kompleksowego przeglądu przetwarzania danych i praktyk związanych z aplikacją TikTok w całej UE, a także przyjęła pismo dotyczące wykorzystania Clearview AI przez organy ścigania. Ponadto EROD przyjęła odpowiedź dla Grupy Doradczej ENISA oraz pismo w odpowiedzi na list otwarty NOYB.

EROD ogłosiła swoją decyzję o ustanowieniu grupy zadaniowej w celu koordynowania potencjalnych działań oraz uzyskania bardziej kompleksowego oglądu procesów i praktyk związanych z aplikacją TikTok w całej UE.

W odpowiedzi na zapytanie posła do Parlamentu Europejskiego Moritza Körnera dotyczące aplikacji TikTok EROD wskazuje, że wydała już wytyczne i zalecenia, które powinny być uwzględniane przez wszystkich administratorów danych przy przetwarzaniu podlegającym RODO, zwłaszcza jeśli chodzi o przekazywanie danych osobowych do państw trzecich, merytoryczne i proceduralne warunki dostępu organów publicznych do danych osobowych oraz terytorialny zakres stosowania RODO, w szczególności w odniesieniu do przetwarzania danych osób nieletnich. EROD przypomina, że RODO ma zastosowanie do przetwarzania danych osobowych przez administratorów danych, nawet niemających jednostki organizacyjnej w UE, jeżeli czynności przetwarzania wiążą się z oferowaniem towarów lub usług osobom, których dane dotyczą, w Unii.

W odpowiedzi skierowanej do posłów do Parlamentu Europejskiego dotyczącej Clearview AI EROD wyraziła obawy dotyczące niektórych zmian zachodzących w technologiach rozpoznawania twarzy. EROD przypomina, że na mocy dyrektywy policyjnej (UE) 2016/680 organy ścigania mogą przetwarzać dane biometryczne w celu jednoznacznego zidentyfikowania osoby fizycznej wyłącznie z zachowaniem rygorystycznych warunków określonych w art. 8 i 10 tej dyrektywy.

EROD ma wątpliwości, czy prawo Unii lub państwa członkowskiego stanowi podstawę prawną dla korzystania z takiej usługi, jak usługa oferowana przez Clearview AI. W związku z tym, w obecnej formie i bez uszczerbku dla jakichkolwiek przyszłych lub toczących się dochodzeń, nie można ustalić zgodności z prawem takiego wykorzystania przez organy ścigania UE.

Bez uszczerbku dla dalszej analizy na podstawie dodatkowych przedstawionych elementów EROD uważa zatem, że wykorzystanie przez organy ścigania takich usług, jak Clearview AI w Unii Europejskiej prawdopodobnie nie byłoby, w obecnej formie, zgodne z unijnym systemem ochrony danych.

Ponadto EROD odsyła do swoich wytycznych dotyczących przetwarzania danych osobowych za pomocą urządzeń wideo i zapowiada, że wkrótce rozpocznie prace nad wykorzystaniem technologii rozpoznawania twarzy przez organy ścigania.

W odpowiedzi na pismo Agencji Unii Europejskiej ds. Cyberbezpieczeństwa (ENISA) z prośbą, aby EROD wyznaczyła przedstawiciela do grupy doradczej ENISA, Rada powołała na tę funkcję Gwendala Le Grand, Zastępcę Sekretarza Generalnego CNIL. Grupa doradcza pomaga Dyrektorowi Wykonawczemu ENISA w opracowywaniu rocznego programu prac oraz zapewnieniu komunikacji z właściwymi zainteresowanymi stronami.

EROD przyjęła odpowiedź na list otwarty NOYB dotyczący współpracy między organami nadzorczymi oraz procedur spójności. W swoim piśmie Rada wskazuje, że stale dąży do poprawy współpracy między organami nadzorczymi oraz do poprawy procedur spójności. Rada ma świadomość, że niektóre kwestie wymagają poprawy – na przykład różnice w krajowych administracyjnych przepisach i praktykach procesowych, a także czas i zasoby konieczne do rozwiązywania spraw transgranicznych. Rada powtarza, że zależy jej na znajdowaniu rozwiązań mieszczących się w zakres jej kompetencji.

Uwaga dla redaktorów:
Wszystkie dokumenty przyjęte na sesji plenarnej EROD podlegają niezbędnym kontrolom pod względem prawnym, językowym i pod względem formatowania oraz zostaną udostępnione na stronie internetowej EROD po ich zakończeniu.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_10

03 June 2020

Bruksela, dnia 3 czerwca – W trakcie 30. sesji plenarnej Europejska Rada Ochrony Danych (EROD) przyjął oświadczenie dotyczące praw osób, których dane dotyczą, w związku ze stanem wyjątkowym w państwach członkowskich. Rada przyjęła również pismo w odpowiedzi na pismo od Civil Liberties Union for Europe (Związek wolności obywatelskich dla Europy), Access Now i węgierskiego związku wolności obywatelskich dotyczące dekretu węgierskiego rządu nr 179/2020 z dnia 4 maja br.

EROD przypomina, że nawet w tych wyjątkowych czasach ochrona danych osobowych musi być zachowana w odniesieniu do wszystkich środków o charakterze wyjątkowym, tym samym przyczyniając się do nadrzędnych wartości demokratycznych, przestrzegania prawa i praw podstawowych, na których opiera się Unia Europejska.

Zarówno w swoim oświadczeniu i piśmie EROD stale powtarza, że RODO ma nadal zastosowanie i pozwala na skuteczną reakcję na pandemię przy jednoczesnej ochronie praw podstawowych i wolności. Przepisy dotyczące ochrony danych już umożliwiają przeprowadzanie operacji przetwarzania danych niezbędnych do udziału w zwalczaniu pandemii COVID-19.

W oświadczeniu przypomina się główne zasady związane z ograniczeniami dotyczącymi praw osób, których dane dotyczą, w związku ze stanem wyjątkowym w państwach członkowskich:

  • Ograniczenia, które są ogólne, rozległe lub zbyt daleko idące w stopniu, w którym unieważniałyby prawo podstawowe, nie znajdują uzasadnienia.
  • Pod pewnymi warunkami art. 23 RODO pozwala ustawodawcom krajowym ograniczyć za pomocą środków legislacyjnych zakres obowiązków administratorów danych i podmiotów przetwarzających dane, a także praw osób, których dane dotyczą, pod warunkiem, że takie ograniczenie uwzględnia istotę praw podstawowych i wolności oraz stanowi niezbędny i proporcjonalny środek w demokratycznej społeczności w celu zapewnienia ochrony istotnych celów leżących w ogólnym interesie publicznym Unii Europejskiej lub państwa członkowskiego, jakim jest w szczególności zdrowie publiczne.
  • Prawa osób, których dane dotyczą, stanowią istotę prawa podstawowego do ochrony danych i w związku z tym art. 23 RODO powinien być interpretowany, mając na uwadze, że ich stosowanie powinno stanowić ogólną zasadę. Jako że ograniczenia są wyjątkami od ogólnej zasady, to powinny być jedynie stosowane w ograniczonych okolicznościach.
  • Ograniczenia muszą mieć umocowanie prawne, a przepisy prawne je ustanawiające powinny być wystarczająco jasne, aby pozwoliły obywatelom zrozumieć warunki, w których administratorzy danych mają prawo je stosować. Ponadto ograniczenia muszą być przewidywalne dla osób, do których są skierowane. Ograniczenia nakładane na czas trwania, który nie został jasno określony, a także które mają moc wsteczną lub zawierają bliżej nieokreślone warunki, nie spełniają kryterium przewidywalności.
  • Sam fakt istnienia pandemii lub jakiejkolwiek innej sytuacji wyjątkowej nie stanowi wystarczającego uzasadnienia dla wprowadzenia jakiegokolwiek ograniczenia praw osób, których dane dotyczą; wręcz przeciwnie, każde ograniczenie musi jasno przyczyniać się do ochrony ważnego celu, jakim jest ogólny interes publiczny UE lub państwa członkowskiego.
  • Stan wyjątkowy, przyjęty w kontekście pandemii, jest warunkiem prawnym, który może legitymizować ograniczenia praw osób, których dane dotyczą, pod warunkiem że ograniczenia te będą miały jedynie zastosowanie, o ile jest to ściśle konieczne i proporcjonalne do osiągnięcia celu, jakim jest ochrona zdrowia publicznego.  Ograniczenia te muszą być ściśle ograniczone co do zakresu i czasu, ponieważ prawa osób, których dane dotyczą, mogą być ograniczone, ale nie odebrane. Ponadto gwarancje przewidziane w art. 23 ust. 2 RODO muszą mieć pełne zastosowanie.
  • Ograniczenia przyjęte w kontekście stanu wyjątkowego zawieszającego lub odraczającego stosowanie praw osób, których dane dotyczą, oraz obowiązków spoczywających na administratorach danych i przetwarzających dane bez ograniczeń w czasie oznaczałyby faktycznie powszechne zawieszenie tych praw i nie byłyby zgodne z istotą praw podstawowych i wolności.

Ponadto EROD ogłosił, że w najbliższym czasie wyda wytyczne dotyczące wdrożenia art. 23 RODO.

Uwaga dla redaktorów:

Wszystkie dokumenty przyjęte na sesji plenarnej EROD podlegają niezbędnym kontrolom pod względem prawnym, językowym i pod względem formatowania oraz zostaną udostępnione na stronie internetowej EROD po ich zakończeniu.

20 May 2020

Bruksela, dnia 20 maja – W trakcie 28. sesji plenarnej Europejska Rada Ochrony Danych (EROD) przyjęła opinię w sprawie projektu standardowych klauzul umownych przedłożonego przez organ nadzorczy Słowenii zgodnie z art. 64 RODO i podjęła decyzję w sprawie publikacji rejestru zawierającego decyzje w ramach mechanizmu kompleksowej współpracy.

EROD przyjęła opinię w sprawie projektu standardowych klauzul umownych dotyczących umów między administratorem a podmiotem przetwarzającym, przedłożonego Radzie przez organ nadzorczy Słowenii. Celem opinii jest zapewnienie spójnego stosowania art. 28 RODO, który nakłada na administratorów i podmioty przetwarzające obowiązek zawarcia umowy lub innego aktu prawnego określającego obowiązki stron. Zgodnie z art. 28 ust. 6 RODO umowy te lub inne akty prawne mogą opierać się, w całości lub w części, na standardowych klauzulach umownych przyjętych przez organ nadzorczy. W opinii Rada formułuje kilka zaleceń, które należy wziąć pod uwagę, aby projekty standardowych klauzul umownych były uznawane za standardowe klauzule umowne. Jeżeli wszystkie zalecenia zostaną wdrożone, organ nadzoru Słowenii będzie mógł przyjąć niniejszy projekt umowy jako standardowe klauzule umowne zgodnie z art. 28 ust. 8 RODO.

EROD opublikuje na swojej stronie internetowej rejestr zawierający decyzje podjęte przez krajowe organy nadzorcze w następstwie procedury w ramach mechanizmu kompleksowej współpracy (art. 60 RODO).

Na mocy RODO organy nadzorcze są zobowiązane do współpracy w sprawach mających wymiar transgraniczny w celu zapewnienia spójnego stosowania rozporządzenia – tzw. mechanizmu kompleksowej współpracy. W ramach mechanizmu kompleksowej współpracy wiodący organ nadzorczy jest odpowiedzialny za przygotowanie projektów decyzji i współpracuje wraz z organami nadzorczymi, których sprawa dotyczy, w celu osiągnięcia konsensusu. Do końca kwietnia 2020 r. główne organy nadzorcze przyjęły 103 ostateczne decyzje dotyczących mechanizmu kompleksowej współpracy. EROD zamierza opublikować streszczenia w języku angielskim przygotowane przez Sekretariat EROD. Informacje te zostaną podane do publicznej wiadomości po zatwierdzeniu przedmiotowego głównego organu nadzorczego i zgodnie z warunkami określonymi w ustawodawstwie krajowym.

Uwaga dla redaktorów:

Wszystkie dokumenty przyjęte na sesji plenarnej EROD podlegają niezbędnym kontrolom pod względem prawnym, językowym i pod względem formatowania oraz zostaną udostępnione na stronie internetowej EROD po ich zakończeniu.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_08

08 May 2020

During its 26th plenary session, the EDPB adopted a letter in response to requests from MEPs Metsola and Halicki regarding the Polish presidential elections taking place via postal vote. Additionally, an exchange of information took place on the recent Hungarian government decrees in relation to the coronavirus during the state of emergency
 
In its response to the MEPs Metsola and Halicki, the EDPB indicates that it is aware that data of Polish citizens was sent from the national PESEL (personal identification) database to the Polish Post by one of the Polish ministries and acknowledges that this issue requires special attention.

The Board underlines that, according to the GDPR, personal data, such as names and addresses, and national identification numbers (such as the Polish PESEL ID), must be processed lawfully, fairly and in a transparent manner, for specified purposes only. Public authorities may disclose information on individuals included in electoral lists, but only when this is specifically authorised by Member State law. The EDPB underlined that the disclosure of personal data – from one entity to another – always requires a legal basis in accordance with EU data protection laws. As previously indicated in the EDPB statement on the use of personal data in political campaigns (2/2019), political parties and candidates - but also public authorities, particularly those responsible for public registers - must stand ready to demonstrate how they have complied with data protection principles. The EDPB also underlined that, where elections are conducted by the collection of postal votes, it is the responsibility of the state to ensure that specific safeguards are in place to maintain the secrecy and integrity of the personal data concerning political opinions.

EDPB Chair, Andrea Jelinek, added: “Elections form the cornerstone of every democratic society. That is why the EDPB has always dedicated special attention to the processing of personal data for election purposes. We encourage data controllers, especially public authorities, to lead by example and process personal data in a manner which is transparent and leaves no doubt regarding the legal basis for the processing operations, including disclosure of data.”

However, the EDPB stresses that enforcement of the GDPR lies with the national supervisory authorities. The EDPB is not a data protection supervisory authority in its own right and, as such, does not have the same competences, tasks and powers as the national supervisory authorities. In the first instance, the assessment of alleged GDPR infringements falls within the competence of the responsible and independent national supervisory authority. Nevertheless, the EDPB will continue to pay special attention to the developments of personal data processing in connection to democratic elections and remains ready to support all members of the Board, including the Polish Supervisory Authority, in such matters.

During the plenary, the Hungarian Supervisory Authority provided the Board with information on the legislative measures the Hungarian government has adopted in relation to the coronavirus during the state of emergency. The Board considers that further explanation is necessary and has thus requested that the Hungarian Supervisory Authority provides further information on the scope and the duration, as well as the Hungarian Supervisory Authority’s opinion on the necessity and proportionality of these measures. The Board will discuss this further during its plenary session next Tuesday.

The agenda of the 26th plenary is available here

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_07

24 April 2020

During its 24th plenary session, the EDPB adopted three letters, reinforcing several elements from its earlier guidance on data protection in the context of fighting the COVID-19 outbreak.

In reply to a letter from the United States Mission to the European Union, the EDPB looks into transfers of health data for research purposes, enabling international cooperation for the development of a vaccine. The US Mission enquired into the possibility of relying on a derogation of Art. 49 GDPR to enable international flows.

The EDPB tackled this topic in detail in its recently adopted guidelines (03/2020) on the processing of health data for scientific research. In its letter, the EDPB reiterates that the GDPR allows for collaboration between EEA and non-EEA scientists in the search for vaccines and treatments against COVID-19, while simultaneously protecting fundamental data protection rights in the EEA.

When data are transferred outside of the EEA, solutions that guarantee the continuous protection of data subjects’ fundamental rights, such as adequacy decisions or appropriate safeguards (included in Article 46 GDPR) should be favoured, according to the EDPB.  

However, the EDPB considers that the fight against COVID-19 has been recognised by the EU and Member States as an important public interest, as it has caused an exceptional sanitary crisis of an unprecedented nature and scale. This may require urgent action in the field of scientific research, necessitating transfers of personal data to third countries or international organisations.
 
In the absence of an adequacy decision or appropriate safeguards, public authorities and private entities may also rely upon derogations included in Article 49 GDPR

Andrea Jelinek, the Chair of the EDPB, said: “The global scientific community is racing against the clock to develop a COVID-19 vaccine or treatment. The EDPB confirms that the GDPR offers tools giving the best guarantees for international transfers of health data and is flexible enough to offer faster temporary solutions in the face of the urgent medical situation.”

The EDPB also adopted a response to a request from MEPs Lucia Ďuriš Nicholsonová and Eugen Jurzyca.

The EDPB replies that data protection laws already take into account data processing operations necessary to contribute to fighting an epidemic, therefore - according to the EDPB - there is no reason to lift GDPR provisions, but to observe them. In addition, the EDPB refers to the guidelines on the issues of geolocation and other tracing tools, as well as the processing of health data for research purposes in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the EDPB, added: “The GDPR is designed to be flexible. As a result, it can enable an efficient response to support the fight against the pandemic, while at the same time protecting fundamental human rights and freedoms. When the processing of personal data is necessary in the context of COVID-19, data protection is indispensable to build trust, to create the conditions for social acceptability of any possible solution and, therefore, to guarantee the effectiveness of these measures”.

The EDPB received two letters from Sophie In 't Veld MEP, raising a series of questions regarding the latest technologies that are being developed in order to fight the spread of COVID-19.

In its reply, the EDPB refers to its recently adopted guidelines (04/2020) on the use of location data and contact tracing apps, which highlight – among other elements - that such schemes should have a voluntary nature, use the least amount of data possible, and should not trace individual movements, but rather use proximity information of users.

The agenda of the 23rd plenary is available here

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_06

21 April 2020

During its 23rd plenary session, the EDPB adopted guidelines on the processing of health data for research purposes in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak and guidelines on geolocation and other tracing tools in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak.

The  guidelines on the processing of health data for research purposes in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak aim to shed light on the most urgent legal questions concerning the use of health data, such as the legal basis of processing, further processing of health data for the purpose of scientific research, the implementation of adequate safeguards and the exercise of data subject rights.

The guidelines state that the GDPR contains several provisions for the processing of health data for the purpose of scientific research, which also apply in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, in particular relating to consent and to the respective national legislations. The GDPR foresees the possibility to process certain special categories of personal data, such as health data, where it is necessary for scientific research purposes.

In addition, the guidelines address legal questions concerning international data transfers involving health data for research purposes related to the fight against COVID-19, in particular in the absence of an adequacy decision or other appropriate safeguards.  

Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the EDPB, said: “Currently, great research efforts are being made in the fight against COVID-19. Researchers hope to produce results as quickly as possible. The GDPR does not stand in the way of scientific research, but enables the lawful processing of health data to support the purpose of finding a vaccine or treatment for COVID-19”.

The guidelines on geolocation and other tracing tools in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak aim to clarify the conditions and principles for the proportionate use of location data and contact tracing tools, for two specific purposes:
1.    using location data to support the response to the pandemic by modelling the spread of the virus in order to assess the overall effectiveness of confinement measures;
2.    using contact tracing, which aims to notify individuals who may have been in close proximity to someone who is eventually confirmed as a carrier of the virus, in order to break the contamination chains as early as possible.

The guidelines emphasise that both the GDPR and the ePrivacy Directive contain specific provisions allowing for the use of anonymous or personal data to support public authorities and other actors at both national and EU level in their efforts to monitor and contain the spread of COVID-19. The general principles of effectiveness, necessity, and proportionality must guide any measures adopted by Member States or EU institutions that involve processing of personal data to fight COVID-19.

The EDPB stands by and underlines the position expressed in its letter to the European Commission (14 April) that the use of contact tracing apps should be voluntary and should not rely on tracing individual movements, but rather on proximity information regarding users.

Dr. Jelinek added: “Apps can never replace nurses and doctors. While data and technology can be important tools, we need to keep in mind that they have intrinsic limitations. Apps can only complement the effectiveness of public health measures and the dedication of healthcare workers that is necessary to fight COVID-19. At any rate, people should not have to choose between an efficient response to the crisis and the protection of fundamental rights.”

In addition, the EDPB adopted a guide for contact tracing apps as an annex to the guidelines. The purpose of this guide, which is non-exhaustive, is to provide general guidance to designers and implementers of contact tracing apps, underlining that any assessment must be carried out on a case-by-case basis.

Both sets of guidelines will exceptionally not be submitted for public consultation due to the urgency of the current situation and the necessity to have the guidelines readily available.

The agenda of the 23rd plenary is available here

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_05

17 April 2020

On April 17th, the EDPB held its 22nd Plenary Session. For further information, please consult the agenda:

Agenda of Twenty-second Plenary

14 April 2020

Following a request for consultation from the European Commission, the European Data Protection Board adopted a letter concerning the European Commission's draft Guidance on apps supporting the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic. This Guidance on data protection and privacy implications complements the European Commission’s Recommendation on apps for contact tracing, published on 8 April and setting out the process towards a common EU toolbox for the use of technology and data to combat and exit from the COVID-19 crisis.
 
Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the EDPB, said: “The EDPB welcomes the Commission’s initiative to develop a pan-European and coordinated approach as this will help to ensure the same level of data protection for every European citizen, regardless of where he or she lives.”
 
In its letter, the EDPB specifically addresses the use of apps for the contact tracing and warning functionality, because this is where increased attention must be paid in order to minimise interferences with private life while still allowing data processing with the goal of preserving public health.
 
The EDPB considers that the development of the apps should be made in an accountable way, documenting with a data protection impact assessment all the implemented privacy by design and privacy by default mechanisms. In addition, the source code should be made publicly available for the widest possible scrutiny by the scientific community.
 
The EDPB strongly supports the Commission’s proposal for a voluntary adoption of such apps, a choice that should be made by individuals as a token of collective responsibility.
 
Finally, the EDPB underlined the need for the Board and its Members, in charge of advising and ensuring the correct application of the GDPR and the E-Privacy Directive, to be fully involved in the whole process of elaboration and implementation of these measures. The EDPB recalls that it intends to publish Guidelines in the upcoming days on geolocation and tracing tools in the context of the COVID-19 out-break.

The EDPB’s letter is available here: https://edpb.europa.eu/letters_en
 
The agenda of the 21th plenary session is available here: https://edpb.europa.eu/our-work-tools/agenda/2020_en#agenda_490

EDPB_Press Release_2020_04

07 April 2020

During its 20th plenary session on April 7th, the European Data Protection Board assigned concrete mandates to its expert subgroups to develop guidance on several aspects of data processing in the fight against COVID-19. This follows the decision made on April 3rd during the EDPB's 19th plenary session.

1.    geolocation and other tracing tools in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak – a mandate was given to the technology expert subgroup for leading this work;
2.    processing of health data for research purposes in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak – a mandate was given to the compliance, e-government and health expert subgroup for leading this work.

Considering the high priority of these 2 topics, the EDPB decided to postpone the guidance work on teleworking tools and practices in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak, for the time being.

Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the EDPB, said: “The EDPB will move swiftly to issue guidance on these topics within the shortest possible notice to help make sure that technology is used in a responsible way to support and hopefully win the battle against the corona pandemic. I strongly believe data protection and public health go hand in hand."

The agenda of the 20th plenary session is available here

EDPB_Press Release_2020_03

03 April 2020

The European Data Protection Board is speeding up its guidance work in response to the COVID-19 crisis. Its monthly plenary meetings are being replaced by weekly remote meetings with the Members of the Board.
 
Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the EDPB, said: "The Board will prioritise providing guidance on the following issues: use of location data and anonymisation of data; processing of health data for scientific and research purposes and the processing of data by technologies used to enable remote working. The EDPB will adopt a horizontal approach and plans to issue general guidance with regard to the appropriate legal bases and applicable legal principles."


The agenda of today's remote meeting is available here

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2020_03

23 March 2020

Following a decision by the EDPB Chair, the EDPB April Plenary Session has been cancelled due to safety concerns surrounding the outbreak of the Coronavirus (COVID-19). The EDPB hereby follows the example of other EU institutions, such as the European Parliament, which have restricted the number of large-scale meetings.

The April Plenary Session was scheduled to take place on 20 and 21 April. Earlier, the EDPB March Plenary was also cancelled for the same reasons. You can find an overview of upcoming EDPB Plenary Meetings here

20 March 2020

On March 19th, the European Data Protection Board adopted a formal statement on the processing of personal data in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak via written procedure. The full statement is available here

 

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2020_02

16 March 2020

Governments, public and private organisations throughout Europe are taking measures to contain and mitigate COVID-19. This can involve the processing of different types of personal data.  

Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the European Data Protection Board (EDPB), said: “Data protection rules (such as GDPR) do not hinder measures taken in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic. However, I would like to underline that, even in these exceptional times, the data controller must ensure the protection of the personal data of the data subjects. Therefore, a number of considerations should be taken into account to guarantee the lawful processing of personal data.”

The GDPR is a broad legislation and also provides for the rules to apply to the processing of personal data in a context such as the one relating to COVID-19. Indeed, the GDPR provides for the legal grounds to enable the employers and the competent public health authorities to process personal data in the context of epidemics, without the need to obtain the consent of the data subject. This applies for instance when the processing of personal data is necessary for the employers for reasons of public interest in the area of public health or to protect vital interests (Art. 6 and 9 of the GDPR) or to comply with another legal obligation.

For the processing of electronic communication data, such as mobile location data, additional rules apply. The national laws implementing the ePrivacy Directive provide for the principle that the location data can only be used by the operator when they are made anonymous, or with the consent of the individuals. The public authorities should first aim for the processing of location data in an anonymous way (i.e. processing data aggregated in a way that it cannot be reversed to personal data). This could enable to generate reports on the concentration of mobile devices at a certain location (“cartography”).  

When it is not possible to only process anonymous data, Art. 15 of the ePrivacy Directive enables the member states to introduce legislative measures pursuing national security and public security *. This emergency legislation is possible under the condition that it constitutes a necessary, appropriate and proportionate measure within a democratic society. If such measures are introduced, a Member State is obliged to put in place adequate safeguards, such as granting individuals the right to judicial remedy.

Update:

On March 19th, the European Data Protection Board adopted a formal statement on the processing of personal data in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak. The full statement is available below.

* In this context, it shall be noted that safeguarding public health may fall under the national and/or public security exception.

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2020_01

10 March 2020

Following a decision by the EDPB Chair, the EDPB March Plenary Session has been cancelled due to safety concerns surrounding the outbreak of the Coronavirus (COVID-19). The EDPB hereby follows the example of other EU institutions, such as the European Parliament, which have restricted the number of large-scale meetings.

The March Plenary Session was scheduled to take place on 19 and 20 March. You can find an overview of upcoming EDPB Plenary Meetings here

20 February 2020

On February 18th and 19th, the EEA Supervisory Authorities and the European Data Protection Supervisor, assembled in the European Data Protection Board, met for their eighteenth plenary session. During the plenary, a wide range of topics was discussed.
 
The EDPB and the individual EEA Supervisory Authorities (SAs) contributed to the evaluation and review of the GDPR as required by Art. 97 GDPR. The EDPB is of the opinion that the application of the GDPR in the first 20 months has been successful. Although the need for sufficient resources for all SAs is still a concern and some challenges remain, resulting, for example, from the patchwork of national procedures, the Board is convinced that the cooperation between SAs will result in a common data protection culture and consistent practice. The EDPB is examining possible solutions to overcome these challenges and to improve existing cooperation procedures. It also calls upon the European Commission to check if national procedures impact the effectiveness of the cooperation procedures and considers that, eventually, legislators may also have a role to play in ensuring further harmonisation. In its assessment, the EDPB also addresses issues such as international transfer tools, impact on SMEs, SA resources and development of new technologies. The EDPB concludes that it is premature to revise the GDPR at this point in time.

The EDPB adopted draft guidelines to provide further clarification regarding the application of Articles 46.2 (a) and 46.3 (b) of the GDPR. These articles address transfers of personal data from EEA public authorities or bodies to public bodies in third countries or to international organisations, where these transfers are not covered by an adequacy decision. The guidelines recommend which safeguards to implement in legally binding instruments (art. 46.2 (a)) or in administrative arrangements (Art. 46.3 (b)) to ensure that the level of protection of natural persons under the GDPR is met and not undermined. The guidelines will be submitted for public consultation.

Statement on privacy implications of mergers
Following the announcement of Google LLC’s intention to acquire Fitbit, the EDPB adopted a statement highlighting that the possible further combination and accumulation of sensitive personal data regarding people in Europe by a major tech company could entail a high level of risk to privacy and data protection. The EDPB reminds the parties to the proposed merger of their obligations under the GDPR and to conduct a full assessment of the data protection requirements and privacy implications of the merger in a transparent way. The Board urges the parties to mitigate possible risks to the rights to privacy and data protection before notifying the merger to the European Commission. The EDPB will consider any implications for the protection of personal data in the EEA and stands ready to contribute its advice to the EC if so requested.

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_02

18 February 2020

On February 18th and 19th, the eighteenth plenary session of the European Data Protection Board is taking place in Brussels. For further information, please consult the agenda.

Agenda of Eighteenth Plenary

30 January 2020

On January 28th and 29th, the EEA Data Protection Authorities and the European Data Protection Supervisor, assembled in the European Data Protection Board, met for their seventeenth plenary session. During the plenary, a wide range of topics was discussed.
 
The EDPB adopted its opinions on the Accreditation Requirements for Codes of Conduct Monitoring Bodies submitted to the Board by the Belgian, Spanish and French supervisory authorities (SAs). These opinions aim to ensure consistency and the correct application of the criteria among EEA SAs.

The EDPB adopted draft Guidelines on Connected Vehicles. As vehicles become increasingly more connected, the amount of data generated about drivers and passengers by these connected vehicles is growing rapidly. The EDPB guidelines focus on the processing of personal data in relation to the non-professional use of connected vehicles by data subjects. More specifically, the guidelines deal with the personal data processed by the vehicle and the data communicated by the vehicle as a connected device. The guidelines will be submitted for public consultation.

The Board adopted the final version of the Guidelines on the processing of Personal Data through Video Devices following public consultation. The guidelines aim to clarify how the GDPR applies to the processing of personal data when using video devices and to ensure the consistent application of the GDPR in this regard. The guidelines cover both traditional video devices and smart video devices. The guidelines address, among others, the lawfulness of processing, including the processing of special categories of data, the applicability of the household exemption and the disclosure of footage to third parties. Following public consultation, several amendments were made.

The EDPB adopted its opinions on the draft accreditation requirements for Certification Bodies submitted to the Board by the UK and Luxembourg SAs. These are the first opinions on accreditation requirements for Certification Bodies adopted by the Board. They aim to establish a consistent and harmonised approach regarding the requirements which SAs and national accreditation bodies will apply when accrediting certification bodies. 

The EDPB adopted its opinion on the draft decision regarding the Fujikura Automotive Europe Group’s Controller Binding Corporate Rules (BCRs), submitted to the Board by the Spanish Supervisory Authority.

Letter on unfair algorithms
The EDPB adopted a letter in response to MEP Sophie in’t Veld’s request concerning the use of unfair algorithms. The letter provides an analysis of the challenges posed by the use of algorithms, an overview of the relevant GDPR provisions and existing guidelines addressing these issues, and describes the work already undertaken by SAs.

Letter to the Council of Europe on the Cybercrime Convention
Following the Board’s contribution to the consultation process on the negotiation of a second additional protocol to the Council of Europe Convention on Cybercrime (Budapest Convention), several EDPB Members actively participated in the Council of Europe Cybercrime Committee’s (T-CY) Octopus Conference. The Board adopted a follow-up letter to the conference, stressing the need to integrate strong data protection safeguards into the future Additional Protocol to the Convention and to ensure its consistency with Convention 108, as well as with the EU Treaties and Charter of Fundamental Rights.

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_01

28 January 2020

On January 28th and 29th, the seventeenth plenary session of the European Data Protection Board is taking place in Brussels. For further information, please consult the agenda.

Agenda of Seventeenth Plenary