Europees Comité voor gegevensbescherming

EDPB News

2020

20 November 2020

Brussels, 20 November - On November 19th, the EDPB met for its 42nd plenary session. During the plenary, the European Commission presented two new sets of draft Standard Contractual Clauses (SCCs) and the EDPB adopted a statement on the future ePrivacy Regulation.
 
The European Commission presented two draft SCCs: one set of SCCs for contracts between controllers and processors, and another one for data transfers outside the EU. The draft controller-processor SCCs are fully new and have been developed by the Commission in accordance with Art. 28 (7) GDPR and Art. 29 (7) of Regulation 2018/1725. These SCCs will have an EU-wide effect and aim to ensure full harmonisation and legal certainty across the EU when it comes to contracts between controllers and their processors. In addition, the Commission presented another set of SCCs for the transfer of personal data to third countries pursuant to Art. 46 (2) (c) GDPR. These SCCs will replace the existing SCCs for international transfers that were adopted on the basis of Directive 95/46 and needed to be updated to bring them in line with GDPR requirements, as well as with the CJEU’s ‘Schrems II’ ruling, and to better reflect the widespread use of new and more complex processing operations often involving multiple data importers and exporters. The Commission has requested a joint opinion from the EDPB and the EDPS on the implementing acts on both sets of SCCs.
 
EDPB Chair Andrea Jelinek said: “The new SCCs for the transfer of personal data to third countries have been highly anticipated, and it is important to point out that they are not a catch-all solution for data transfers post-Schrems II. While the updated SCCs are an important piece of the puzzle and a very important development, data exporters should still make the puzzle complete. The step-by-step approach of the EDPB recommendations on supplementary measures is necessary to bring the level of protection of the data transferred up to the EU standard of essential equivalence. Together with the EDPS, the Board will now thoroughly draft a joint opinion on the two sets of draft SCCs as invited by the European Commission.”
 
Recommendations 1/2020 on supplementary measures: During the plenary, the Members of the Board decided to extend the deadline for the public consultation on the Recommendations on measures that supplement transfer tools to ensure compliance with the EU level of protection of personal data from 30 November 2020 until 21 December 2020.

The EDPB adopted a statement on the future ePrivacy Regulation and the future role of supervisory authorities and the EDPB in this context. The EDPB expressed concerns about some new orientations of the discussions in the Council concerning the enforcement of the future ePrivacy Regulation, which could lead to fragmented supervision, procedural complexity and a lack of consistency and legal certainty for individuals and companies. The EDPB underlines that many of the provisions of the future ePrivacy Regulation concern processing of personal data and that many provisions of the GDPR and the ePrivacy Regulation are closely intertwined. Consistent interpretation and enforcement of both sets of rules, when covering personal data protection, would therefore be fulfilled in the most efficient way, if the enforcement of those parts of the ePrivacy Regulation and the GDPR would be entrusted to the same authority.
 
EDPB Chair Andrea Jelinek added: “The oversight of personal data processing activities under the ePrivacy Regulation should  be entrusted  to  the  same  national  authorities that are responsible for the enforcement of the GDPR. This will ensure a high level of data protection, guarantee a level playing field and ensure a harmonised interpretation and enforcement of the personal data processing elements of the ePrivacy Regulation across the EU.”
 
The EDPB also stressed the need to adopt the new Regulation as soon as possible.
 
The EDPB added that this statement is without prejudice to the Board’s previous positions, including its statement of March 2019 and May 2018 and reiterated that the future ePrivacy Regulation should under no circumstance lower the level of protection offered by the current ePrivacy Directive and should complement the GDPR by providing additional strong guarantees for confidentiality and protection of all types of electronic communications.

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_19

16 November 2020

***Registration has been closed***

On November 27, the EDPB is organising a remote stakeholder workshop on the topic of Legitimate Interest. Representatives from, among others, individual companies, sector organisations, NGOs, law firms and academia are welcome to express interest in attending.

Places will be allocated on a first come, first served basis, depending on availability. We will contact your organisation in case your registration has been successful.

Detailed information and the programme of the event will be available shortly.

As we would like to have a balanced and representative audience, participation will be limited to one participant per organisation.

When? November 27th 2020, from 10:00 - 16:00

11 November 2020

Brussels, 11 November - During its 41st plenary session, the EDPB adopted recommendations on measures that supplement transfer tools to ensure compliance with the EU level of protection of personal data, as well as recommendations on the European Essential Guarantees for surveillance measures. 

Both documents were adopted as a follow-up to the CJEU’s ‘Schrems II’ ruling. As a result of the ruling on July 16th, controllers  relying on Standard Contractual Clauses (SCCs) are required to verify, on a case-by-case basis and, where appropriate, in collaboration with the recipient of the data in the third country, if the law of the third country ensures a level of protection of the personal data transferred that is essentially equivalent to that guaranteed in the European Economic Area (EEA). The CJEU allowed exporters to add measures that are supplementary to the SCCs to ensure effective compliance with that level of protection where the safeguards contained in SCCs are not sufficient.   

The recommendations aim to assist controllers and processors acting as data exporters with their duty to identify and implement appropriate supplementary measures where they are needed to ensure an essentially equivalent level of protection to the data they transfer to third countries. In doing so, the EDPB seeks a consistent application of the GDPR and the Court’s ruling across the EEA. 

EDPB Chair, Andrea Jelinek said: “The EDPB is acutely aware of the impact of the Schrems II ruling on thousands of EU businesses and the important responsibility it places on data exporters. The EDPB hopes that these recommendations can help data exporters with identifying and implementing effective supplementary measures where they are needed. Our goal is to enable lawful transfers of personal data to third countries while guaranteeing that the data transferred is afforded a level of protection essentially equivalent to that guaranteed within the EEA.”  

The recommendations contain a roadmap of the steps data exporters must take to find out if they need to put in place supplementary measures to be able to transfer data outside the EEA in accordance with EU law, and help them identify those that could be effective. To assist data exporters, the recommendations also contain a non-exhaustive list of examples of supplementary measures and some of the conditions they would require to be effective. 

However, in the end data exporters are responsible for making the concrete assessment in the context of the transfer, the third country law and the transfer tool they are relying on. Data exporters must proceed with due diligence and document their process thoroughly, as they will be held accountable to the decisions they take on that basis, in line with the GDPR principle of accountability. Moreover, data exporters should know that it may not be possible to implement sufficient supplementary measures in every case.

The recommendations on the supplementary measures will be submitted to public consultation. They will be applicable immediately following their publication. 

In addition, the EDPB adopted recommendations on the European Essential Guarantees for surveillance measures. The recommendations on the European Essential Guarantees are complementary to the recommendations on supplementary measures. The European Essential Guarantees recommendations provide data exporters with elements to determine if the legal framework governing public authorities’ access to data for surveillance purposes in third countries can be regarded as a justifiable interference with the rights to privacy and the protection of personal data, and therefore as not impinging on the commitments of the Article 46 GDPR transfer tool the data exporter and importer rely on.

The Chair added: “The implications of the Schrems II judgment extend to all transfers to third countries. Therefore, there are no quick fixes, nor a one-size-fits-all solution for all transfers, as this would be ignoring the wide diversity of situations data exporters face. Data exporters will need to evaluate their data processing operations and transfers and take effective measures bearing in mind the legal order of the third countries to which they transfer or intend to transfer data.”

The EEA data protection supervisory authorities will continue coordinating their actions in the EDPB to ensure consistency in the application of EU data protection law. 

The agenda of the forty-first plenary is available here.

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_18

10 November 2020

Brussels, 10 November - During its 41st plenary session, the EDPB adopted by a 2/3 majority of its members its first dispute resolution decision on the basis of Art. 65 GDPR. The binding decision seeks to address the dispute arisen following a draft decision issued by the Irish SA as lead supervisory authority (LSA) regarding Twitter International Company and the subsequent relevant and reasoned objections (RROs) expressed by a number of concerned supervisory authorities (CSAs). 

The Irish SA issued the draft decision following an own-volition inquiry and investigations into Twitter International Company, after the company notified the Irish SA of a personal data breach on 8 January 2019. In May 2020, the Irish SA shared its draft decision with the CSAs in accordance with Art. 60 (3) GDPR. The CSAs then had four weeks to submit their RROs. Among others, the CSAs issued RROs on the infringements of the GDPR identified by the LSA, the role of Twitter International Company as the (sole) data controller, and the quantification of the proposed fine. 

As the LSA rejected the objections and/or considered they were not “relevant and reasoned”, it referred the matter to the EDPB in accordance with Art 60 (4) GDPR, thereby initiating the dispute resolution procedure. 

Following the submission by the LSA, the completeness of the file was assessed, resulting in the formal launch of the Art. 65 procedure on 8 September 2020. In compliance with Article 65 (3) GDPR and in conjunction with Article 11.4 of the EDPB Rules of Procedure, the default adoption timeline of one month was extended by a further month because of the complexity of the subject matter. 

On 9 November 2020, the EDPB adopted its binding decision and will shortly notify it formally to the Irish SA. 

The Irish SA shall adopt its final decision on the basis of the EDPB decision, which will be addressed to the controller, without undue delay and at the latest one month after the EDPB has notified its decision. The LSA and CSAs shall notify the EDPB of the date the final decision was notified to the controller. Following this notification, the EDPB will publish its decision on its website.

For further information see: Art. 65 FAQ

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_17

21 October 2020

Brussel, 21 oktober — Op 20 oktober is het Europees Comité voor gegevensbescherming (EDPB) bijeengekomen voor zijn veertigste plenaire vergadering. Tijdens de plenaire vergadering is een breed scala aan onderwerpen besproken.

Na een openbare raadpleging heeft het EDPB de definitieve versie aangenomen van de richtsnoeren inzake gegevensbescherming door ontwerp en door standaardinstellingen. De richtsnoeren zijn gericht op de verplichte gegevensbescherming door ontwerp en door standaardinstellingen zoals beschreven in artikel 25 van de algemene verordening gegevensbescherming (AVG). De voornaamste verplichting waarin dat artikel voorziet, is de doeltreffende uitvoering van de gegevensbeschermingsbeginselen en eerbiediging van de rechten en vrijheden van betrokkenen door ontwerp en door standaardinstellingen. Daartoe moeten verwerkingsverantwoordelijken passende technische en organisatorische maatregelen treffen en de nodige waarborgen inbouwen voor de daadwerkelijke naleving van de gegevensbeschermingsbeginselen en de bescherming van de rechten en vrijheden van de betrokkenen. Bovendien moeten verwerkingsverantwoordelijken kunnen aantonen dat de toegepaste maatregelen doeltreffend zijn.

De richtsnoeren omvatten tevens een leidraad over de doeltreffende uitvoering van de in artikel 5, lid 1, van de AVG genoemde beginselen inzake verwerking van persoonsgegevens, met een overzicht van belangrijke ontwerp- en standaardinstellingselementen en praktijksituaties ter illustratie. Daarnaast bevatten zij aanbevelingen over de wijze waarop verwerkingsverantwoordelijken, verwerkers en producenten kunnen samenwerken om voor gegevensbescherming door ontwerp en door standaardinstellingen te zorgen.

In de definitieve richtsnoeren zijn formuleringen bijgewerkt en zijn aanvullende juridische toelichtingen opgenomen naar aanleiding van opmerkingen en feedback die het comité tijdens de openbare raadpleging heeft ontvangen.

Het EDPB heeft besloten een gecoördineerd handhavingskader (GHK) in te stellen. Het GHK voorziet in een structuur voor de coördinatie van jaarlijks terugkerende activiteiten van de toezichthoudende autoriteiten die deel uitmaken van het EDPB. Het GHK heeft ten doel op flexibele en gecoördineerde wijze gemeenschappelijke acties mogelijk te maken, van gezamenlijke bewustmaking en informatievergaring tot breed opgezette handhavingsoperaties en gemeenschappelijke onderzoeken. Jaarlijks terugkerende gecoördineerde acties zijn erop gericht de naleving te bevorderen, betrokkenen in staat te stellen hun rechten uit te oefenen en gegevensbescherming meer onder de aandacht te brengen.

Het EDPB heeft een brief opgesteld in antwoord op opmerkingen van de Europäische Akademie für Informationsfreiheit und Datenschutz over de gevolgen van artikel 17 van de auteursrechtrichtlijn voor de gegevensbescherming, met name wat betreft uploadfilters. In zijn brief verklaart het EDPB dat elke verwerking van persoonsgegevens in verband met uploadfilters evenredig en noodzakelijk moet zijn en dat de verwerking van persoonsgegevens bij de toepassing van artikel 17 van de auteursrechtrichtlijn zoveel mogelijk moet worden vermeden. Wanneer de verwerking van persoonsgegevens noodzakelijk is, bijvoorbeeld in het kader van het klachten- en beroepsmechanisme, moet zij zich beperken tot de gegevens die voor dit specifieke doel noodzakelijk zijn en moeten daarbij alle andere beginselen van de AVG in acht worden genomen. Daarnaast heeft het EDPB erop gewezen dat het over deze kwestie doorlopend overleg voert met de Commissie en zijn bereidheid tot verdere samenwerking heeft betuigd.

Informatie voor redacteurs:
Alle documenten die tijdens de zitting van het Europees Comité voor gegevensbescherming worden goedgekeurd, worden onderworpen aan de nodige juridische, taalkundige en formatteringscontroles en zullen op de website van het Comité beschikbaar worden gesteld zodra deze controles zijn afgerond.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_16

12 October 2020

Brussel, 12 oktober – Tijdens zijn 39e plenaire vergadering heeft het Comité richtsnoeren vastgesteld voor het concept “relevant en gemotiveerd bezwaar”. De richtsnoeren zullen bijdragen aan een uniforme interpretatie van het concept, waardoor toekomstige procedures in het kader van artikel 65 van de AVG worden gestroomlijnd.

Binnen de procedure voor samenwerking zoals vastgesteld in de AVG hebben de toezichthoudende autoriteiten de verplichting om “alle relevante informatie met elkaar uit [te wisselen]” en samen te werken “teneinde tot een consensus te proberen te komen”. Overeenkomstig artikel 60, leden 3 en 4, van de AVG moet de leidende toezichthoudende autoriteit een ontwerpbesluit voorleggen aan de betrokken toezichthoudende autoriteiten die vervolgens binnen een specifieke termijn een relevant en gemotiveerd bezwaar kunnen indienen. Na ontvangst van een relevant en gemotiveerd bezwaar heeft de leidende toezichthoudende autoriteit twee opties. Indien zij het relevante en gemotiveerde bezwaar afwijst of het niet relevant of gemotiveerd acht, legt zij de kwestie voor aan het Comité in het kader van het coherentiemechanisme (artikel 65 van de AVG). Indien de leidende toezichthoudende autoriteit het bezwaar echter honoreert en een herzien ontwerpbesluit voorlegt, kunnen de betrokken toezichthoudende autoriteiten een relevant en gemotiveerd bezwaar tegen het herziene ontwerpbesluit indienen binnen een termijn van twee weken.

Met de richtlijnen wordt beoogd tot een gemeenschappelijke interpretatie te komen van het begrip “relevant en gemotiveerd bezwaar”, met inbegrip van wat er moet worden meegenomen in de beoordeling of een bezwaar “duidelijk de omvang [aantoont] van de risico's die het ontwerpbesluit inhoudt” (artikel 4, punt 24, van de AVG).

Informatie voor redacteurs:

Alle documenten die tijdens de zitting van het Europees Comité voor gegevensbescherming worden goedgekeurd, worden onderworpen aan de nodige juridische, taalkundige en formatteringscontroles en zullen op de website van het Comité beschikbaar worden gesteld zodra deze controles zijn afgerond.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_15

04 September 2020

Brussel, 3 september – Het Comité heeft richtsnoeren over de begrippen verwerkingsverantwoordelijke en verwerker in de algemene verordening gegevensbescherming (AVG) en richtsnoeren over afstemming op gebruikers van sociale media aangenomen. Daarnaast heeft het Comité een taskforce opgericht voor het behandelen van klachten naar aanleiding van het arrest van het HvJ-EU in de zaak Schrems II en een taskforce die zich bezighoudt met de aanvullende maatregelen die van exporteurs en importeurs van gegevens kunnen worden vereist om passende bescherming te bieden bij de doorgifte van gegevens in de context van het arrest van het HvJ-EU in de zaak Schrems II.

Het Comité heeft Richtsnoeren over de begrippen verwerkingsverantwoordelijke en verwerker in de AVG aangenomen. Na de inwerkingtreding van de AVG is de kwestie naar voren gekomen in hoeverre deze begrippen door de AVG zijn gewijzigd, met name met betrekking tot het begrip gezamenlijke verwerkingsverantwoordelijkheid (zoals vastgelegd in artikel 26 AVG en in verschillende uitspraken van het HvJ-EU), en met betrekking tot de verplichtingen van verwerkers (met name artikel 28 AVG) die zijn vastgelegd in hoofdstuk IV AVG.

In maart 2019 heeft het Comité in samenwerking met zijn secretariaat een evenement voor belanghebbenden georganiseerd. Tijdens dat evenement werd duidelijk dat er behoefte was aan meer praktische richtsnoeren en ontstond bij het Comité meer begrip voor de behoeften en zorgen in de praktijk. De nieuwe richtsnoeren bestaan uit twee onderdelen: in het eerste worden de verschillende begrippen toegelicht en het tweede bevat gedetailleerde richtsnoeren met betrekking tot de belangrijkste gevolgen die deze begrippen hebben voor de verwerkingsverantwoordelijken, verwerkers en gezamenlijke verwerkingsverantwoordelijken. In de richtsnoeren is een stroomschema opgenomen om als aanvullend praktisch richtsnoer te dienen. De richtsnoeren zullen aan een openbare raadpleging worden onderworpen.

Het Comité heeft Richtsnoeren over afstemming op gebruikers van sociale media aangenomen. De richtsnoeren hebben tot doel een praktische leidraad te bieden aan belanghebbenden en bevatten een aantal voorbeelden van verschillende situaties, zodat belanghebbenden snel kunnen zien welk scenario het dichtst in de buurt komt van de wijze waarop zij zich op gebruikers willen richten. Het voornaamste doel van de richtsnoeren is het verduidelijken van de rol en verantwoordelijkheden van de aanbieder van sociale media en de persoon waarop deze zich richt. Daartoe wordt in de richtsnoeren onder andere aandacht geschonken aan de mogelijke risico’s voor de vrijheden van personen, de belangrijkste actoren en hun rollen, de toepassing van de belangrijkste eisen inzake gegevensbescherming, zoals rechtmatigheid, transparantie en gegevensbeschermingseffectbeoordelingen, alsook wezenlijke elementen van de overeenkomsten tussen aanbieders van sociale media en de personen waarop zij zich richten. Ook wordt in de richtsnoeren aandacht besteed aan verschillende afstemmingsmechanismen, de verwerking van verschillende categorieën gegevens en de verplichting van gezamenlijke verwerkingsverantwoordelijken om een passende regeling op te stellen overeenkomstig artikel 26 AVG. De leden van de plenaire vergadering dienen de richtsnoeren voor openbare raadpleging in.

Het Comité heeft een taskforce voor het behandelen van klachten die zijn ingediend naar aanleiding van het arrest van het HvJ-EU in de zaak Schrems II opgericht. In totaal hebben de gegevensbeschermingsautoriteiten in de EER 101 identieke klachten ontvangen tegen verschillende verwerkingsverantwoordelijken in de EER-lidstaten met betrekking tot hun gebruik van diensten van Google en/of Facebook waarbij persoonsgegevens worden doorgegeven. De klagers, die worden vertegenwoordigd door de ngo NOYB, menen met name dat Google en/of Facebook persoonsgegevens naar de VS doorgeven op grond van het EU-VS-privacyschild of op grond van modelcontractbepalingen en dat de verwerkingsverantwoordelijke volgens het recente arrest van het HvJ-EU in zaak C-311/18 geen gepaste bescherming van de persoonsgegevens van de klagers kan verzekeren. De taskforce zal de zaak analyseren en zal ervoor zorgen dat daarbij nauw samengewerkt wordt door de leden van het Comité.

Naar aanleiding van de uitspraak van het HvJ-EU in de zaak Schrems II en in aanvulling op de op 23 juli aangenomen veelgestelde vragen heeft het Comité een taskforce opgericht. Deze taskforce zal aanbevelingen opstellen om verwerkingsverantwoordelijken en verwerkers te ondersteunen bij hun verplichting om aanvullende maatregelen vast te stellen en in te voeren om passende bescherming te garanderen bij de doorgifte van gegevens naar derde landen.

Andrea Jelinek, voorzitter van het Comité: “Het Comité is zich ervan bewust dat op grond van het arrest in de zaak Schrems II een belangrijke verantwoordelijkheid aan verwerkingsverantwoordelijken wordt gegeven. Naast de verklaring en de veelgestelde vragen die we vlak na het arrest hebben uitgebracht, zullen we aanbevelingen opstellen om verwerkingsverantwoordelijken en verwerkers te ondersteunen bij hun verplichting om aanvullende maatregelen van juridische, technische en organisatorische aard vast te stellen en in te voeren om te voldoen aan de “overeenkomst in grote lijnen”-norm bij de doorgifte van gegevens naar derde landen. De gevolgen van dit arrest zijn echter omvangrijk en de situaties waarin gegevens naar derde landen worden doorgegeven zijn erg divers. Er is daarom geen uniforme, snelle oplossing beschikbaar in deze kwestie. Elke organisatie zal zijn eigen gegevensverwerkingsactiviteiten en doorgiften moeten evalueren en passende maatregelen moeten nemen.”

Informatie voor redacteurs:
Alle documenten die tijdens de zitting van het Europees Comité voor gegevensbescherming worden goedgekeurd, worden onderworpen aan de nodige juridische, taalkundige en formatteringscontroles en zullen op de website van het Comité beschikbaar worden gesteld zodra deze controles zijn afgerond.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_14

24 July 2020

Europees Comité voor gegevensbescherming publiceert veelgestelde vragen over arrest van HvJ-EU in C-311/18 (Schrems II)

Naar aanleiding van het arrest van het Hof van Justitie van de Europese Unie (HvJ-EU) in zaak C-311/18 ‒ Data Protection Commissioner tegen Facebook Ireland Ltd en Maximillian Schrems, heeft het EDPB een document met veelgestelde vragen aangenomen om een eerste verduidelijking te verschaffen aan belanghebbenden en richtsnoeren te verstrekken inzake het gebruik van rechtsinstrumenten voor de doorgifte van persoonsgegevens aan derde landen, met inbegrip van de VS. Dit document wordt opgesteld en aangevuld met verdere richtsnoeren, aangezien het EDPB het arrest van het Hof van Justitie blijft onderzoeken en beoordelen. 

Het document met veelgestelde vragen over het arrest van het Hof van Justitie in zaak C-311/18 is hier te vinden.

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2020_06

23 July 2020

Brussel, 23 juli – In het licht van het aanstaande einde van de Brexit-overgangsperiode heeft het EDPB een informatieve nota aangenomen met een overzicht van de maatregelen die moeten worden getroffen door toezichthoudende autoriteiten (TA’s), organisaties met goedgekeurde bindende bedrijfsvoorschriften (Binding Corporate Rules – BCR’s) en organisaties die nog op goedkeuring van hun BCR’s door de TA VK wachten , om te waarborgen dat deze voorschriften na het eind van de overgangsperiode nog steeds kunnen worden gebruikt als geldig instrument voor de doorgifte van gegevens. Aangezien de TA VK na de overgangsperiode niet langer in aanmerking komt voor de functie van bevoegde TA, zullen de door de TA VK uit hoofde van de algemene verordening gegevensbescherming (AVG) genomen goedkeuringsbesluiten dan geen rechtsgevolgen meer hebben in de EER. Bovendien moet de inhoud van de betrokken BCR’s mogelijk voor het einde van de overgangsperiode worden gewijzigd, aangezien deze voorschriften normaal gesproken verwijzingen naar de rechtsorde van het Verenigd Koninkrijk bevatten. Dit geldt ook voor de BCR's die reeds overeenkomstig Richtlijn 94/46/EG zijn goedgekeurd.

Organisaties met BCR’s waarvoor de TA VK als primaire toezichthoudende autoriteit fungeert, moeten alle nodige organisatorische regelingen treffen om een nieuwe primaire toezichthoudende autoriteit in de EER aan te wijzen. De wisseling van primaire toezichthoudende autoriteit voor de BCR’s moet voor het einde van de overgangsperiode van Brexit van kracht worden.

Organisaties die thans een BCR-goedkeuringsaanvraag hebben lopen, wordt aangeraden om ruim voor het einde van de Brexit-overgangsperiode alle nodige organisatorische regelingen te treffen om een nieuwe primaire toezichthoudende autoriteit in de EER aan te wijzen, zoals het verstrekken van benodigde informatie aan de betreffende TA met betrekking tot waarom deze TA wordt aangemerkt als de nieuwe primaire toezichthoudende autoriteit voor de BCR’s. De laatstgenoemde neemt de aanvraag over en initieert formeel een goedkeuringsprocedure, die afhankelijk is van het advies van het Europees Comité voor gegevensbescherming. BCR's die door de TA VK overeenkomstig de AVG zijn goedgekeurd, moeten door de nieuwe primaire toezichthoudende autoriteit voor BCR’s in de EER voor het einde van de overgangsperiode opnieuw worden goedgekeurd, na een advies van het EDPB. Het EDPB heeft ook een bijlage vastgesteld met daarin een checklist met elementen die in verband met de Brexit moeten worden gewijzigd in documenten inzake bindende bedrijfsvoorschriften.

Deze informatieve nota loopt niet vooruit op de momenteel door het EDPB verrichte analyse van de gevolgen van het arrest van het Hof van Justitie van de Europese Unie in de zaak Data Protection Commissioner tegen Facebook Ireland en Schrems voor BCR’s als instrumenten voor de doorgifte van gegevens.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_13

20 July 2020

Brussel, 20 juli - Tijdens zijn vierendertigste plenaire vergadering heeft het Europees Comité voor gegevensbescherming (EDPB) een verklaring aangenomen over het arrest van het Hof van Justitie van de Europese Unie (HvJ-EU) in de zaak Facebook Ireland/Schrems. Het Comité heeft richtsnoeren vastgesteld inzake de wisselwerking tussen de tweede richtlijn betalingsdiensten en de AVG, alsook een antwoordbrief aan EP-lid Ďuriš Nicholsonová over het traceren van contacten, interoperabiliteit van apps en privacyeffectbeoordelingen (PEB’s).

Het EDPB heeft een verklaring aangenomen over het arrest van het Hof van Justitie van de Europese Unie in zaak C-311/18, Data Protection Commissioner tegen Facebook Ireland Ltd en Maximillian Schrems, waarbij Uitvoeringsbesluit (EU) 2016/1250 betreffende de gepastheid van de door het EU-VS-privacyschild geboden bescherming ongeldig werd verklaard en Besluit 2010/87/EU van de Commissie betreffende modelcontractbepalingen voor de doorgifte van persoonsgegevens aan in derde landen gevestigde verwerkers als geldig wordt erkend.

Met betrekking tot het privacyschild wijst het Comité erop dat de EU en de VS overeenkomstig het arrest een volledig en doeltreffend kader tot stand moeten brengen waarmee wordt gewaarborgd dat het niveau van bescherming van persoonsgegevens in de VS in wezen gelijkwaardig is aan het niveau dat binnen de EU wordt gegarandeerd. Het Comité is voornemens er constructief toe bij te dragen dat voor een trans-Atlantische doorgifte van persoonsgegevens wordt gezorgd waarbij de belangen van EER-burgers en -organisaties in acht worden genomen, en is bereid de Europese Commissie bijstand en advies te verstrekken om samen met de VS een nieuw kader op te zetten dat volledig in overeenstemming is met de EU-wetgeving inzake gegevensbescherming.

Wat de modelcontractbepalingen betreft, neemt het Comité kennis van de primaire verantwoordelijkheid van de exporteur en de importeur om, wanneer zij voornemens zijn overeenkomsten met modelcontractbepalingen aan te gaan, een niveau van bescherming te waarborgen dat in wezen gelijkwaardig is aan het niveau dat in overeenstemming met het Handvest wordt gewaarborgd door de AVG. Bij de uitvoering van een dergelijke voorafgaande beoordeling is de exporteur (indien nodig met de hulp van de importeur) verplicht rekening te houden met de inhoud van de modelcontractbepalingen, de specifieke omstandigheden van de doorgifte en het bestaande rechtsstelsel in het land van de importeur. Het Hof benadrukt dat de exporteur wellicht moet overwegen aanvullende maatregelen te treffen naast de maatregelen die in de modelcontractbepalingen zijn opgenomen. Het Comité zal nader onderzoeken waaruit deze aanvullende maatregelen zouden kunnen bestaan.

Het Comité neemt ook kennis van de plicht van de bevoegde toezichthoudende autoriteiten om een doorgifte van gegevens naar een derde land op basis van de modelcontractbepalingen op te schorten of te verbieden, wanneer, gelet op alle omstandigheden van die doorgifte, die bepalingen in dat derde land niet worden of niet kunnen worden nageleefd en de bescherming van de doorgegeven gegevens niet kan worden gewaarborgd met andere middelen, met name indien de verwerkingsverantwoordelijke of de verwerker niet zelf de doorgifte reeds heeft opgeschort of beëindigd.

Het Comité brengt in herinnering dat het richtsnoeren heeft aangenomen inzake afwijkingen op grond van artikel 49 van de AVG en dat dergelijke afwijkingen per geval moeten worden toegepast.

Het Comité zal het arrest nader bestuderen, meer duidelijkheid verschaffen aan belanghebbenden en richtsnoeren verstrekken inzake het gebruik van instrumenten voor de doorgifte van persoonsgegevens aan derde landen in overeenstemming met het arrest. Het Comité en zijn Europese toezichthoudende autoriteiten staan ook klaar om voor de vereiste en door het HvJ-EU benadrukte consistentie tussen de EER-landen te zorgen.

De volledige verklaring is hier te vinden: https://edpb.europa.eu/news/news/2020/statement-court-justice-european-union-judgment-case-c-31118-data-protection_nl

De EDPB heeft richtsnoeren over de tweede richtlijn betalingsdiensten aangenomen. De tweede richtlijn betalingsdiensten moderniseert het rechtskader voor de markt voor betalingsdiensten. Belangrijk is dat de tweede richtlijn betalingsdiensten een rechtskader voor nieuwe betalingsinitiatiediensten en rekeninginformatiediensten introduceert. Gebruikers kunnen erom verzoeken dat deze nieuwe betalingsdienstaanbieders toegang krijgen tot hun betaalrekeningen. Naar aanleiding van een workshop voor belanghebbenden in februari 2019 heeft het Comité richtsnoeren inzake de toepassing van de AVG op deze nieuwe betalingsdiensten opgesteld.

In de richtsnoeren wordt erop gewezen dat in deze context de verwerking van bijzondere categorieën persoonsgegevens in het algemeen verboden is (overeenkomstig artikel 9, lid 1, AVG), behalve wanneer de betrokkene uitdrukkelijke toestemming heeft gegeven (artikel 9, lid 2, onder a), AVG) of wanneer de verwerking noodzakelijk is om redenen van zwaarwegend algemeen belang (artikel 9, lid 2, onder g), AVG).

De richtsnoeren behandelen ook voorwaarden waaronder rekeninghoudende betalingsdienstaanbieders toegang tot betaalrekeninginformatie verlenen aan betalingsinitiatiedienstaanbieders en rekeninginformatiedienstaanbieders, met name gedetailleerde toegang tot betaalrekeningen.

In de richtsnoeren wordt verduidelijkt dat noch artikel 66, lid 3, onder g), noch artikel 67, lid 2, onder f), van de tweede richtlijn betalingsdiensten verdere verwerking toestaat, tenzij de betrokkene overeenkomstig artikel 6, lid 1, onder a), van de AVG toestemming heeft gegeven of het recht van de Unie of het recht van de lidstaten in een dergelijke verwerking voorziet. De richtsnoeren zullen aan een openbare raadpleging worden onderworpen.

Tot slot heeft het Comité een brief aangenomen in antwoord op de vragen van EP-lid Ďuriš Nicholsonová over gegevensbescherming in de context van de bestrijding van COVID-19. In de brief worden vragen gesteld over de harmonisatie en interoperabiliteit van apps voor het traceren van contacten, het vereiste van een privacyeffectbeoordeling voor een dergelijke verwerking en de duur van de verwerking.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_12

17 July 2020


The European Data Protection Board has adopted the following statement:


The EDPB welcomes the CJEU’s judgment, which highlights the fundamental right to privacy in the context of the transfer of personal data to third countries. The CJEU’s decision is one of great importance. The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) has taken note of the fact that the Court of Justice invalidates Decision 2016/1250 on the adequacy of the protection provided by the EU-US Privacy Shield, and of the fact that it considers Commission Decision 2010/87 on Standard Contractual Clauses (SCCs) for the transfer of personal data to processors established in third countries valid.


The EDPB discussed the Court’s ruling during its 34th plenary session of 17 July 2020.


With regard to the Privacy Shield, the EDPB points out that the EU and the U.S. should achieve a complete and effective framework guaranteeing that the level of protection granted to personal data in the U.S. is essentially equivalent to that guaranteed within the EU, in line with the judgment.


The EDPB identified in the past some of the main flaws of the Privacy Shield on which the CJEU grounds its decision to declare it invalid.


The EDPB questioned in its reports on the annual joint reviews of Privacy Shield the compliance with the data protection principles of necessity and proportionality in the application of U.S. law. (1)


The EDPB intends to continue playing a constructive part in securing a transatlantic transfer of personal data that benefits EEA citizens and organisations and stands ready to provide the European Commission with assistance and guidance to help it build, together with the U.S., a new framework that fully complies with EU data protection law.


While the SCCs remain valid, the CJEU underlines the need to ensure that these maintain, in practice, a level of protection that is essentially equivalent to the one guaranteed by the GDPR in light of the EU Charter. The assessment of whether the countries to which data are sent offer adequate protection is primarily the responsibility of the exporter and the importer, when considering whether to enter into SCCs. When performing such prior assessment, the exporter (if necessary, with the assistance of the importer) shall take into consideration the content of the SCCs, the specific circumstances of the transfer, as well as the legal regime applicable in the importer’s country. The examination of the latter shall be done in light of the non-exhaustive factors set out under Art 45(2) GDPR.


If the result of this assessment is that the country of the importer does not provide an essentially equivalent level of protection, the exporter may have to consider putting in place additional measures to those included in the SCCs. The EDPB is looking further into what these additional measures could consist of.


The CJEU’s judgment also recalls the importance for the exporter and importer to comply with their obligations included in the SCCs, in particular the information obligations in relation to change of legislation in the importer’s country. When those contractual obligations are not or cannot be complied with, the exporter is bound by the SCCs to suspend the transfer or terminate the SCCs or to notify its competent supervisory authority if it intends to continue transferring data.


The EDPB takes note of the duties for the competent supervisory authorities (SAs) to suspend or prohibit a transfer of data to a third country pursuant to SCCs, if, in the view of the competent SA and in the light of all the circumstances of that transfer, those clauses are not or cannot be complied with in that third country, and the protection of the data transferred cannot be ensured by other means, in particular where the controller or a processor has not already itself suspended or put an end to the transfer.


The EDPB recalls that it issued guidelines on Art 49 GDPR derogations (2); and that such derogations must be applied on a case-by-case basis.


The EDPB will assess the judgment in more detail and provide further clarification for stakeholders and guidance on the use of instruments for the transfer of personal data to third countries pursuant to the judgment.


The EDPB and its European SAs stand ready, as stated by the CJEU, to ensure consistency across the EEA.


For the European Data Protection Board


The Chair


(Andrea Jelinek)

 

(1) See EDPB, EU-U.S. Privacy Shield  - Second Annual Joint Review report here, and  EDPB, EU -U.S. Privacy Shield   - Third Annual Joint Review report here.

(2) DPB Guidelines 2/2018 on derogations of Article 49 under Regulation 2016/679, adopted on 25 May 2018, p3.

 

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2020_05

25 June 2020

The EDPB has published a new register containing decisions taken by national supervisory authorities following the One-Stop-Shop cooperation procedure (Art. 60 GDPR) on its website.


Under the GDPR, Supervisory Authorities have a duty to cooperate on cases with a cross-border component to ensure a consistent application of the regulation - the so-called one-stop-shop (OSS) mechanism. Under the OSS, the Lead Supervisory Authority (LSA) is in charge of preparing the draft decisions and works together with the concerned SAs to reach consensus. Up until early June, LSAs have adopted 110 final OSS decisions. The register includes access to the decisions as well as  summaries of the decisions in English prepared by the EDPB Secretariat. The register will be valuable to data protection practitioners who will gain access to information showcasing how SAs work together to enforce the GDPR in practice. The information in the register has been validated by the LSAs in question and in accordance with the conditions provided by its national legislation.

The register is accessible here

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2020_04

17 June 2020

During its 32nd plenary session, the EDPB adopted a statement on the interoperability of contact tracing apps, as well as a statement on the opening of borders and data protection rights. The Board also adopted two letters to MEP Körner - on encryption and on Article 25 GDPR - and a letter to CEAOB on PCAOB arrangements.

The EDPB adopted a statement on the interoperability of contact tracing applications, building on the EDPB Guidelines 04/2020 on the use of location data and contact tracing tools in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak. The statement offers a more in-depth analysis of key aspects, including transparency, legal basis, controllership, data subject rights, data retention and minimisation, information security and data accuracy in the context of creating an interoperable network of applications, that need to be considered on top of those highlighted in the EDPB Guidelines 04/2020.

The EDPB emphasises that the sharing of data about individuals that have been diagnosed or tested positively with such interoperable applications should only be triggered by a voluntary action of the user. Giving data subjects information and control will increase their trust in the solutions and their potential uptake. The goal of interoperability should not be used as an argument to extend the collection of personal data beyond what is necessary.

Moreover, contact tracing apps need to be part of a comprehensive public health strategy to fight the pandemic, such as testing and subsequent manual contact tracing for the purpose of improving effectiveness of the performed measures.

Ensuring interoperability is not only technically challenging and sometimes impossible without disproportionate trade-offs, but also leads to a potential increased data protection risk. Therefore, controllers need to ensure measures are effective and proportionate and must assess whether a less intrusive alternative can achieve the same purpose.

The EDPB adopted a statement on the processing of personal data in the context of reopening the Schengen borders following the COVID-19 outbreak. The measures allowing a safe reopening of the borders currently envisaged or implemented by Member States include testing for COVID-19, requiring certificates issued by health professionals and the use of a voluntary contact tracing app. Most measures involve processing of personal data.

The EDPB recalls that data protection legislation remains applicable and allows for an efficient response to the pandemic, while at the same time protecting fundamental rights and freedoms. The EDPB stresses that the processing of personal data must be necessary and proportionate, and the level of protection should be consistent throughout the EEA. In the statement, the EDPB urges the Member States to take a common European approach when deciding which processing of personal data is necessary in this context.

The statement also addresses the GDPR principles that Member States need to pay special attention to when processing personal data in the context of reopening the border. These include lawfulness, fairness and transparency, purpose limitation, data minimisation, storage limitation, security of data and data protection by design and by default. Moreover, the decision to allow the entrance into a country should not only be based on the automated individual decision making technologies. In any case, such decisions should be subject to suitable safeguards, which should include specific information to the data subject and the right to obtain human intervention, to express his or her point of view, to obtain an explanation of the decision reached after such assessment and to challenge the decision. Automated individual decision measures should not apply to children.

Finally, the EDPB highlights the importance of a prior consultation with competent national supervisory authorities when Member States intend to process personal data in this context.

The EDPB adopted a response to a letter from MEP Moritz Körner on the relevance of encryption bans in third countries for assessing the level of data protection when personal data are transferred to countries where these bans exist. According to the EDPB, any ban on encryption or provisions weakening encryption would seriously undermine compliance with GDPR security obligations applicable to controllers and processors, be that in a third country or in the EEA. Security measures are one of the elements the European Commission must take into account when assessing the adequacy of the level of protection in a third country.

A second letter to MEP Körner addresses the topic of laptop camera covers. MEP Körner highlighted that this technology could help comply with the GDPR and suggested new laptops should be equipped with it. In its reply, the Board clarifies that while laptop manufacturers should be encouraged to take into account the right to data protection when developing and designing such products, they are not responsible for the processing carried out with those products and the GDPR does not establish legal obligations for manufacturers, unless they also act as controllers or processors. Controllers must evaluate the risks of each processing and choose the appropriate safeguards to comply with GDPR, including the privacy by design and by default enshrined in Article 25 GDPR.

Finally, the EDPB adopted a letter to the Committee of European Auditor Oversight Bodies (CEAOB). The EDPB received a proposal from the CEAOB, which gathers the national auditor oversight bodies at EU level, to cooperate and receive feedback on negotiations of draft administrative arrangements for the transfer of data to the US Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB). The EDPB welcomes this proposal and indicates that it is available to hold an exchange with the CEAOB to clarify any potential questions on data protection requirements related to such arrangements in light of the EDPB Guidelines 2/2020 on Art. 46 (2) (a) and 46 (3) (b) GDPR for transfers of personal data between EEA and non-EEA public authorities. The exchange could also involve the PCAOB if the CEAOB and its members deem it beneficial for their work on these arrangements.

The agenda of the 32nd plenary is available here

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_11

10 June 2020

Brussel, 10 juni – Tijdens zijn eenendertigste plenaire vergadering heeft het EDPB besloten een taskforce op te richten om mogelijke maatregelen te coördineren en om een uitvoeriger overzicht te verkrijgen met betrekking tot de gegevensverwerking en praktijken van TikTok in de EU, en heeft het EDPB een brief opgesteld over het gebruik van Clearview IA door rechtshandhavingsinstanties. Bovendien heeft het EDPB een antwoord op de Enisa-adviesgroep vastgesteld, alsook een brief in antwoord op een open brief van NOYB.

Het EDPB heeft bekendgemaakt dat het heeft besloten een taskforce op te richten om mogelijke maatregelen te coördineren en om een uitvoeriger overzicht te verkrijgen met betrekking tot de gegevensverwerking en praktijken van TikTok in de EU.

In antwoord op het verzoek van EP-lid Körner met betrekking tot TikTok, geeft het EDPB aan dat het Comité al richtsnoeren en aanbevelingen heeft uitgebracht die gelden voor alle verwerkingsverantwoordelijken wier verwerking onder de AVG valt, met name wat betreft de doorgifte van persoonsgegevens aan derde landen, materiële en procedurele voorwaarden voor toegang tot persoonsgegevens door overheidsinstanties of de toepassing van het territoriale toepassingsgebied van de AVG, in het bijzonder met betrekking tot de verwerking van de gegevens van minderjarigen. Het EDPB herinnert eraan dat de AVG van toepassing is op de verwerking van persoonsgegevens door een verwerkingsverantwoordelijke, ook als deze zich niet in de EU bevindt, wanneer de verwerkingsactiviteiten betrekking hebben op het aanbieden van goederen of diensten aan inwoners van de EU.

In zijn antwoord aan leden van het Europees Parlement inzake Clearview AI heeft het EDPB zijn bezorgdheid geuit over bepaalde ontwikkelingen op het gebied van gezichtsherkenningstechnologieën. Het EDPB herinnert eraan dat rechtshandhavingsinstanties volgens de richtlijn wetshandhaving (Richtlijn (EU) 2016/680) biometrische gegevens uitsluitend met het oog op de unieke identificatie van een natuurlijke persoon mogen verwerken, overeenkomstig de strikte voorwaarden van de artikelen 8 en 10 van die richtlijn.

Het EDPB betwijfelt of enige wet van de Unie of een lidstaat als rechtsgrondslag kan dienen voor het gebruik van de door Clearview AI aangeboden dienst of dergelijke diensten. In de huidige situatie en onverminderd eventueel toekomstig of lopend onderzoek, kan de wettigheid van dergelijk gebruik door de rechtshandhavingsinstanties in de EU niet worden vastgesteld.

Onverminderd verdere analyse op basis van verstrekte aanvullende gegevens is het EDPB daarom van oordeel dat het gebruik van een dienst als Clearview AI door rechtshandhavingsinstantie in de Europese Unie momenteel waarschijnlijk niet in lijn is met de gegevensbeschermingsregeling van de EU.

Tenslotte verwijst het EDPB naar zijn richtsnoeren inzake de verwerking van persoonsgegevens door middel van videoapparatuur en kondigt het Comité verdere werkzaamheden aan in verband met het gebruik van gezichtsherkenningstechnologie door rechtshandhavingsinstanties.

In antwoord op een brief van het Agentschap van de Europese Unie voor cyberbeveiliging (Enisa) waarin het EDPB wordt verzocht een vertegenwoordiger aan te wijzen voor de adviesgroep van Enisa, heeft de raad van bestuur Gwendal Le Grand, adjunct-secretaris-generaal van de Franse nationale commissie voor gegevensbescherming (CNIL), benoemd tot vertegenwoordiger. De adviesgroep staat de uitvoerend directeur van Enisa bij door een jaarlijks werkprogramma op te stellen en de communicatie met betrokken belanghebbenden te verzorgen.

Het EDPB heeft een antwoord aangenomen naar aanleiding van een open brief van NOYB inzake samenwerking tussen de toezichthoudende autoriteiten en de consistentieprocedures. In zijn brief geeft het Comité aan voortdurend te hebben gewerkt aan de verbetering van de samenwerking tussen de toezichthoudende autoriteiten en de consistentieprocedures. Het Comité is zich ervan bewust dat er verbeterpunten zijn, zoals de verschillen tussen nationale administratieve procedurele wetten en praktijken, en de tijd en middelen die nodig zijn om grensoverschrijdende zaken te beslechten. Het Comité herhaalt dat het zich inzet om oplossingen te vinden, voor zover deze onder zijn bevoegdheid vallen.

Informatie voor redacteurs:
Alle documenten die tijdens de zitting van het Europees Comité voor gegevensbescherming worden goedgekeurd, worden onderworpen aan de nodige juridische, taalkundige en formatteringscontroles en zullen op de website van het Comité beschikbaar worden gesteld zodra deze controles zijn afgerond.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_10

03 June 2020

Brussel, 3 juni – Tijdens zijn dertigste plenaire vergadering heeft het Europees Comité voor gegevensbescherming (EDPB) een verklaring aangenomen over rechten van betrokkenen in verband met de in bepaalde lidstaten afgekondigde noodtoestand. Het Comité nam ook een brief aan in antwoord op een brief van de Civil Liberties Union for Europe, Access Now en de Hongaarse Unie voor burgerlijke vrijheden (HCLU) over Decreet 179/2020 van de Hongaarse overheid van 4 mei.

Het EDPB herinnert eraan dat de bescherming van persoonsgegevens ook in deze uitzonderlijke tijden bij de vaststelling van alle noodmaatregelen moet worden gehandhaafd teneinde bij te dragen aan de eerbiediging van de overkoepelende waarden van de democratie, de rechtsstaat en grondrechten, die het fundament van de Unie vormen.

Zowel in de verklaring als in de brief herhaalt het EDPB dat de AVG van toepassing blijft en dat het ook met inachtneming van de AVG mogelijk is doeltreffend op de pandemie te reageren en tegelijkertijd de grondrechten en fundamentele vrijheden te beschermen. De gegevensverwerkingen die noodzakelijk zijn voor de bestrijding van de COVID-19-pandemie zijn reeds mogelijk in het kader van de wetgeving inzake gegevensbescherming.

In de verklaring wordt herinnerd aan de belangrijkste beginselen die van toepassing zijn op beperkingen van rechten van betrokkenen in verband met de noodtoestand in bepaalde lidstaten:

  • beperkingen die dusdanig algemeen, omvangrijk of inbreukmakend zijn dat een grondrecht daardoor van zijn wezenlijke inhoud wordt ontdaan, zijn niet gerechtvaardigd;
  • volgens artikel 23 van de AVG is het nationale wetgevers toegestaan de reikwijdte van de verplichtingen van de verwerkingsverantwoordelijken en verwerkers en de rechten van betrokkenen te beperken door middel van wettelijke bepalingen op voorwaarde dat die beperking de wezenlijke inhoud van de grondrechten en fundamentele vrijheden onverlet laat en in een democratische samenleving een noodzakelijke en evenredige maatregel is ter waarborging van belangrijke doelstellingen van algemeen belang van de Unie of van een lidstaat, zoals met name de volksgezondheid;
  • de rechten van betrokkenen vormen de kern van het grondrecht op gegevensbescherming en het uitgangspunt van de uitlegging en lezing van artikel 23 van de AVG moet zijn dat deze rechten als algemene regel toepassing moeten vinden. Aangezien beperkingen uitzondering op de algemene regel zijn, mogen zij uitsluitend in bepaalde welomschreven omstandigheden worden toegepast;
  • de beperkingen moeten wettelijk worden vastgesteld en de wet tot vaststelling van de beperkingen moet voldoende duidelijk zijn, zodat burgers kunnen begrijpen onder welke voorwaarden verwerkingsverantwoordelijken bevoegd zijn beperkingen toe te passen. Bovendien moeten beperkingen voorspelbaar zijn voor personen waarop ze betrekking hebben. Beperkingen die worden opgelegd voor onbepaalde duur, die met terugwerkende kracht gelden of onderworpen zijn aan niet nader omschreven voorwaarden, voldoen niet aan het vereiste van voorspelbaarheid;
  • het bestaan van een pandemie of enige andere noodsituatie vormt op zichzelf onvoldoende reden voor welke beperking van de rechten van betrokkenen dan ook; elke beperking moet daarentegen duidelijk bijdragen aan de verwezenlijking van een belangrijke doelstelling van algemeen belang van de EU of van een lidstaat;
  • de in verband met een pandemie uitgeroepen noodtoestand is een juridische voorwaarde die de beperking van rechten van de betrokkene kan rechtvaardigen, mits deze beperkingen alleen gelden voor zover dit strikt noodzakelijk en evenredig is voor het waarborgen van de volksgezondheid. Beperkingen moeten dus strikt in reikwijdte en tijdsduur worden beperkt, aangezien de rechten van betrokkenen wel kunnen worden beperkt, maar hun niet kunnen worden ontzegd. De in artikel 23, lid 2, van de AVG opgenomen waarborgen moeten volledig van toepassing zijn;
  • beperkingen die in het kader van een noodtoestand worden vastgesteld en de toepassing van de rechten van betrokkenen en de verplichtingen voor verwerkingsverantwoordelijken en gegevensverwerkers opschorten of uitstellen zonder duidelijke beperking van tijdsduur, komen feitelijk neer op een volledige schorsing van deze rechten en zijn niet verenigbaar met de wezenlijke inhoud van de grondrechten en de fundamentele vrijheden.

Voorts heeft het EDPB aangekondigd dat het de komende maanden richtsnoeren zal uitvaardigen voor de uitvoering van artikel 23 van de AVG.

Informatie voor redacteurs:

Alle documenten die tijdens de zitting van het Europees Comité voor gegevensbescherming worden goedgekeurd, worden onderworpen aan de nodige juridische, taalkundige en formatteringscontroles en zullen op de website van het Comité beschikbaar worden gesteld zodra deze controles zijn afgerond.

20 May 2020

Brussel, 20 mei – Tijdens zijn achtentwintigste plenaire vergadering heeft het Europees Comité voor gegevensbescherming (EDPB) een advies krachtens artikel 64 van de algemene verordening gegevensbescherming (AVG) uitgebracht over het door de Sloveense toezichthoudende autoriteit ingediende ontwerp voor standaardcontractbepalingen en heeft het EDPB beslist over de publicatie van een register met één-loketbesluiten.

Het EDPB heeft advies uitgebracht over het door de Sloveense toezichthoudende autoriteit bij het Comité ingediende ontwerp voor standaardcontractbepalingen voor overeenkomsten tussen de verwerker en verwerkingsverantwoordelijke. Doel van het advies is de waarborging van de consistente toepassing van artikel 28 van de AVG, dat de verwerkingsverantwoordelijke en de verwerker verplicht een overeenkomst of andere rechtshandeling aan te gaan waarin de respectieve verplichtingen van de partijen worden vastgelegd. Overeenkomstig artikel 28, lid 6, van de AVG kunnen deze overeenkomsten of andere rechtshandelingen geheel of ten dele gebaseerd zijn op door een toezichthoudende autoriteit vastgestelde standaardcontractbepalingen. In het advies doet het Comité een aantal aanbevelingen waarmee rekening moet worden gehouden opdat deze ontwerpen voor standaardcontractbepalingen kunnen worden aangemerkt als standaardcontractbepalingen. Indien alle aanbevelingen worden opgevolgd, kan de Sloveense toezichthoudende autoriteit deze ontwerpovereenkomst als standaardcontractbepalingen aannemen overeenkomstig artikel 28, lid 8, van de AVG.

Na afronding van de één-loketsamenwerkingsprocedure (artikel 60 van de AVG) publiceert de EDPB op zijn website een register met door de nationale toezichthoudende autoriteiten genomen besluiten.

Volgens de AVG zijn toezichthoudende autoriteiten verplicht bij grensoverschrijdende zaken samen te werken om een consistente toepassing van de verordening te waarborgen – het zogenoemde één-loketmechanisme. Volgens het één-loketmechanisme is de leidende toezichthoudende autoriteit verantwoordelijk voor het opstellen van de ontwerpbesluiten en werkt zij samen met de betrokken toezichthoudende autoriteiten om consensus te bereiken. Tot eind april 2020 hebben leidende toezichthoudende autoriteiten 103 definitieve één-loketbesluiten aangenomen. Het EDPB is voornemens om door het secretariaat van het EDPB in het Engels opgestelde samenvattingen van die besluiten te publiceren. De informatie wordt openbaar gemaakt na de validering door de leidende toezichthoudende autoriteit en in overeenstemming met de in de betreffende nationale wetgeving opgenomen voorwaarden.

Informatie voor redacteurs:

Alle documenten die tijdens de zitting van het Europees Comité voor gegevensbescherming worden goedgekeurd, worden onderworpen aan de nodige juridische, taalkundige en formatteringscontroles en zullen op de website van het Comité beschikbaar worden gesteld zodra deze controles zijn afgerond.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_08

08 May 2020

During its 26th plenary session, the EDPB adopted a letter in response to requests from MEPs Metsola and Halicki regarding the Polish presidential elections taking place via postal vote. Additionally, an exchange of information took place on the recent Hungarian government decrees in relation to the coronavirus during the state of emergency
 
In its response to the MEPs Metsola and Halicki, the EDPB indicates that it is aware that data of Polish citizens was sent from the national PESEL (personal identification) database to the Polish Post by one of the Polish ministries and acknowledges that this issue requires special attention.

The Board underlines that, according to the GDPR, personal data, such as names and addresses, and national identification numbers (such as the Polish PESEL ID), must be processed lawfully, fairly and in a transparent manner, for specified purposes only. Public authorities may disclose information on individuals included in electoral lists, but only when this is specifically authorised by Member State law. The EDPB underlined that the disclosure of personal data – from one entity to another – always requires a legal basis in accordance with EU data protection laws. As previously indicated in the EDPB statement on the use of personal data in political campaigns (2/2019), political parties and candidates - but also public authorities, particularly those responsible for public registers - must stand ready to demonstrate how they have complied with data protection principles. The EDPB also underlined that, where elections are conducted by the collection of postal votes, it is the responsibility of the state to ensure that specific safeguards are in place to maintain the secrecy and integrity of the personal data concerning political opinions.

EDPB Chair, Andrea Jelinek, added: “Elections form the cornerstone of every democratic society. That is why the EDPB has always dedicated special attention to the processing of personal data for election purposes. We encourage data controllers, especially public authorities, to lead by example and process personal data in a manner which is transparent and leaves no doubt regarding the legal basis for the processing operations, including disclosure of data.”

However, the EDPB stresses that enforcement of the GDPR lies with the national supervisory authorities. The EDPB is not a data protection supervisory authority in its own right and, as such, does not have the same competences, tasks and powers as the national supervisory authorities. In the first instance, the assessment of alleged GDPR infringements falls within the competence of the responsible and independent national supervisory authority. Nevertheless, the EDPB will continue to pay special attention to the developments of personal data processing in connection to democratic elections and remains ready to support all members of the Board, including the Polish Supervisory Authority, in such matters.

During the plenary, the Hungarian Supervisory Authority provided the Board with information on the legislative measures the Hungarian government has adopted in relation to the coronavirus during the state of emergency. The Board considers that further explanation is necessary and has thus requested that the Hungarian Supervisory Authority provides further information on the scope and the duration, as well as the Hungarian Supervisory Authority’s opinion on the necessity and proportionality of these measures. The Board will discuss this further during its plenary session next Tuesday.

The agenda of the 26th plenary is available here

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_07

24 April 2020

During its 24th plenary session, the EDPB adopted three letters, reinforcing several elements from its earlier guidance on data protection in the context of fighting the COVID-19 outbreak.

In reply to a letter from the United States Mission to the European Union, the EDPB looks into transfers of health data for research purposes, enabling international cooperation for the development of a vaccine. The US Mission enquired into the possibility of relying on a derogation of Art. 49 GDPR to enable international flows.

The EDPB tackled this topic in detail in its recently adopted guidelines (03/2020) on the processing of health data for scientific research. In its letter, the EDPB reiterates that the GDPR allows for collaboration between EEA and non-EEA scientists in the search for vaccines and treatments against COVID-19, while simultaneously protecting fundamental data protection rights in the EEA.

When data are transferred outside of the EEA, solutions that guarantee the continuous protection of data subjects’ fundamental rights, such as adequacy decisions or appropriate safeguards (included in Article 46 GDPR) should be favoured, according to the EDPB.  

However, the EDPB considers that the fight against COVID-19 has been recognised by the EU and Member States as an important public interest, as it has caused an exceptional sanitary crisis of an unprecedented nature and scale. This may require urgent action in the field of scientific research, necessitating transfers of personal data to third countries or international organisations.
 
In the absence of an adequacy decision or appropriate safeguards, public authorities and private entities may also rely upon derogations included in Article 49 GDPR

Andrea Jelinek, the Chair of the EDPB, said: “The global scientific community is racing against the clock to develop a COVID-19 vaccine or treatment. The EDPB confirms that the GDPR offers tools giving the best guarantees for international transfers of health data and is flexible enough to offer faster temporary solutions in the face of the urgent medical situation.”

The EDPB also adopted a response to a request from MEPs Lucia Ďuriš Nicholsonová and Eugen Jurzyca.

The EDPB replies that data protection laws already take into account data processing operations necessary to contribute to fighting an epidemic, therefore - according to the EDPB - there is no reason to lift GDPR provisions, but to observe them. In addition, the EDPB refers to the guidelines on the issues of geolocation and other tracing tools, as well as the processing of health data for research purposes in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the EDPB, added: “The GDPR is designed to be flexible. As a result, it can enable an efficient response to support the fight against the pandemic, while at the same time protecting fundamental human rights and freedoms. When the processing of personal data is necessary in the context of COVID-19, data protection is indispensable to build trust, to create the conditions for social acceptability of any possible solution and, therefore, to guarantee the effectiveness of these measures”.

The EDPB received two letters from Sophie In 't Veld MEP, raising a series of questions regarding the latest technologies that are being developed in order to fight the spread of COVID-19.

In its reply, the EDPB refers to its recently adopted guidelines (04/2020) on the use of location data and contact tracing apps, which highlight – among other elements - that such schemes should have a voluntary nature, use the least amount of data possible, and should not trace individual movements, but rather use proximity information of users.

The agenda of the 23rd plenary is available here

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_06

21 April 2020

During its 23rd plenary session, the EDPB adopted guidelines on the processing of health data for research purposes in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak and guidelines on geolocation and other tracing tools in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak.

The  guidelines on the processing of health data for research purposes in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak aim to shed light on the most urgent legal questions concerning the use of health data, such as the legal basis of processing, further processing of health data for the purpose of scientific research, the implementation of adequate safeguards and the exercise of data subject rights.

The guidelines state that the GDPR contains several provisions for the processing of health data for the purpose of scientific research, which also apply in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, in particular relating to consent and to the respective national legislations. The GDPR foresees the possibility to process certain special categories of personal data, such as health data, where it is necessary for scientific research purposes.

In addition, the guidelines address legal questions concerning international data transfers involving health data for research purposes related to the fight against COVID-19, in particular in the absence of an adequacy decision or other appropriate safeguards.  

Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the EDPB, said: “Currently, great research efforts are being made in the fight against COVID-19. Researchers hope to produce results as quickly as possible. The GDPR does not stand in the way of scientific research, but enables the lawful processing of health data to support the purpose of finding a vaccine or treatment for COVID-19”.

The guidelines on geolocation and other tracing tools in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak aim to clarify the conditions and principles for the proportionate use of location data and contact tracing tools, for two specific purposes:
1.    using location data to support the response to the pandemic by modelling the spread of the virus in order to assess the overall effectiveness of confinement measures;
2.    using contact tracing, which aims to notify individuals who may have been in close proximity to someone who is eventually confirmed as a carrier of the virus, in order to break the contamination chains as early as possible.

The guidelines emphasise that both the GDPR and the ePrivacy Directive contain specific provisions allowing for the use of anonymous or personal data to support public authorities and other actors at both national and EU level in their efforts to monitor and contain the spread of COVID-19. The general principles of effectiveness, necessity, and proportionality must guide any measures adopted by Member States or EU institutions that involve processing of personal data to fight COVID-19.

The EDPB stands by and underlines the position expressed in its letter to the European Commission (14 April) that the use of contact tracing apps should be voluntary and should not rely on tracing individual movements, but rather on proximity information regarding users.

Dr. Jelinek added: “Apps can never replace nurses and doctors. While data and technology can be important tools, we need to keep in mind that they have intrinsic limitations. Apps can only complement the effectiveness of public health measures and the dedication of healthcare workers that is necessary to fight COVID-19. At any rate, people should not have to choose between an efficient response to the crisis and the protection of fundamental rights.”

In addition, the EDPB adopted a guide for contact tracing apps as an annex to the guidelines. The purpose of this guide, which is non-exhaustive, is to provide general guidance to designers and implementers of contact tracing apps, underlining that any assessment must be carried out on a case-by-case basis.

Both sets of guidelines will exceptionally not be submitted for public consultation due to the urgency of the current situation and the necessity to have the guidelines readily available.

The agenda of the 23rd plenary is available here

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_05

17 April 2020

On April 17th, the EDPB held its 22nd Plenary Session. For further information, please consult the agenda:

Agenda of Twenty-second Plenary

14 April 2020

Following a request for consultation from the European Commission, the European Data Protection Board adopted a letter concerning the European Commission's draft Guidance on apps supporting the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic. This Guidance on data protection and privacy implications complements the European Commission’s Recommendation on apps for contact tracing, published on 8 April and setting out the process towards a common EU toolbox for the use of technology and data to combat and exit from the COVID-19 crisis.
 
Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the EDPB, said: “The EDPB welcomes the Commission’s initiative to develop a pan-European and coordinated approach as this will help to ensure the same level of data protection for every European citizen, regardless of where he or she lives.”
 
In its letter, the EDPB specifically addresses the use of apps for the contact tracing and warning functionality, because this is where increased attention must be paid in order to minimise interferences with private life while still allowing data processing with the goal of preserving public health.
 
The EDPB considers that the development of the apps should be made in an accountable way, documenting with a data protection impact assessment all the implemented privacy by design and privacy by default mechanisms. In addition, the source code should be made publicly available for the widest possible scrutiny by the scientific community.
 
The EDPB strongly supports the Commission’s proposal for a voluntary adoption of such apps, a choice that should be made by individuals as a token of collective responsibility.
 
Finally, the EDPB underlined the need for the Board and its Members, in charge of advising and ensuring the correct application of the GDPR and the E-Privacy Directive, to be fully involved in the whole process of elaboration and implementation of these measures. The EDPB recalls that it intends to publish Guidelines in the upcoming days on geolocation and tracing tools in the context of the COVID-19 out-break.

The EDPB’s letter is available here: https://edpb.europa.eu/letters_en
 
The agenda of the 21th plenary session is available here: https://edpb.europa.eu/our-work-tools/agenda/2020_en#agenda_490

EDPB_Press Release_2020_04

07 April 2020

During its 20th plenary session on April 7th, the European Data Protection Board assigned concrete mandates to its expert subgroups to develop guidance on several aspects of data processing in the fight against COVID-19. This follows the decision made on April 3rd during the EDPB's 19th plenary session.

1.    geolocation and other tracing tools in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak – a mandate was given to the technology expert subgroup for leading this work;
2.    processing of health data for research purposes in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak – a mandate was given to the compliance, e-government and health expert subgroup for leading this work.

Considering the high priority of these 2 topics, the EDPB decided to postpone the guidance work on teleworking tools and practices in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak, for the time being.

Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the EDPB, said: “The EDPB will move swiftly to issue guidance on these topics within the shortest possible notice to help make sure that technology is used in a responsible way to support and hopefully win the battle against the corona pandemic. I strongly believe data protection and public health go hand in hand."

The agenda of the 20th plenary session is available here

EDPB_Press Release_2020_03

03 April 2020

The European Data Protection Board is speeding up its guidance work in response to the COVID-19 crisis. Its monthly plenary meetings are being replaced by weekly remote meetings with the Members of the Board.
 
Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the EDPB, said: "The Board will prioritise providing guidance on the following issues: use of location data and anonymisation of data; processing of health data for scientific and research purposes and the processing of data by technologies used to enable remote working. The EDPB will adopt a horizontal approach and plans to issue general guidance with regard to the appropriate legal bases and applicable legal principles."


The agenda of today's remote meeting is available here

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2020_03

23 March 2020

Following a decision by the EDPB Chair, the EDPB April Plenary Session has been cancelled due to safety concerns surrounding the outbreak of the Coronavirus (COVID-19). The EDPB hereby follows the example of other EU institutions, such as the European Parliament, which have restricted the number of large-scale meetings.

The April Plenary Session was scheduled to take place on 20 and 21 April. Earlier, the EDPB March Plenary was also cancelled for the same reasons. You can find an overview of upcoming EDPB Plenary Meetings here

20 March 2020

On March 19th, the European Data Protection Board adopted a formal statement on the processing of personal data in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak via written procedure. The full statement is available here

 

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2020_02

16 March 2020

Governments, public and private organisations throughout Europe are taking measures to contain and mitigate COVID-19. This can involve the processing of different types of personal data.  

Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the European Data Protection Board (EDPB), said: “Data protection rules (such as GDPR) do not hinder measures taken in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic. However, I would like to underline that, even in these exceptional times, the data controller must ensure the protection of the personal data of the data subjects. Therefore, a number of considerations should be taken into account to guarantee the lawful processing of personal data.”

The GDPR is a broad legislation and also provides for the rules to apply to the processing of personal data in a context such as the one relating to COVID-19. Indeed, the GDPR provides for the legal grounds to enable the employers and the competent public health authorities to process personal data in the context of epidemics, without the need to obtain the consent of the data subject. This applies for instance when the processing of personal data is necessary for the employers for reasons of public interest in the area of public health or to protect vital interests (Art. 6 and 9 of the GDPR) or to comply with another legal obligation.

For the processing of electronic communication data, such as mobile location data, additional rules apply. The national laws implementing the ePrivacy Directive provide for the principle that the location data can only be used by the operator when they are made anonymous, or with the consent of the individuals. The public authorities should first aim for the processing of location data in an anonymous way (i.e. processing data aggregated in a way that it cannot be reversed to personal data). This could enable to generate reports on the concentration of mobile devices at a certain location (“cartography”).  

When it is not possible to only process anonymous data, Art. 15 of the ePrivacy Directive enables the member states to introduce legislative measures pursuing national security and public security *. This emergency legislation is possible under the condition that it constitutes a necessary, appropriate and proportionate measure within a democratic society. If such measures are introduced, a Member State is obliged to put in place adequate safeguards, such as granting individuals the right to judicial remedy.

Update:

On March 19th, the European Data Protection Board adopted a formal statement on the processing of personal data in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak. The full statement is available below.

* In this context, it shall be noted that safeguarding public health may fall under the national and/or public security exception.

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2020_01

10 March 2020

Following a decision by the EDPB Chair, the EDPB March Plenary Session has been cancelled due to safety concerns surrounding the outbreak of the Coronavirus (COVID-19). The EDPB hereby follows the example of other EU institutions, such as the European Parliament, which have restricted the number of large-scale meetings.

The March Plenary Session was scheduled to take place on 19 and 20 March. You can find an overview of upcoming EDPB Plenary Meetings here

20 February 2020

On February 18th and 19th, the EEA Supervisory Authorities and the European Data Protection Supervisor, assembled in the European Data Protection Board, met for their eighteenth plenary session. During the plenary, a wide range of topics was discussed.
 
The EDPB and the individual EEA Supervisory Authorities (SAs) contributed to the evaluation and review of the GDPR as required by Art. 97 GDPR. The EDPB is of the opinion that the application of the GDPR in the first 20 months has been successful. Although the need for sufficient resources for all SAs is still a concern and some challenges remain, resulting, for example, from the patchwork of national procedures, the Board is convinced that the cooperation between SAs will result in a common data protection culture and consistent practice. The EDPB is examining possible solutions to overcome these challenges and to improve existing cooperation procedures. It also calls upon the European Commission to check if national procedures impact the effectiveness of the cooperation procedures and considers that, eventually, legislators may also have a role to play in ensuring further harmonisation. In its assessment, the EDPB also addresses issues such as international transfer tools, impact on SMEs, SA resources and development of new technologies. The EDPB concludes that it is premature to revise the GDPR at this point in time.

The EDPB adopted draft guidelines to provide further clarification regarding the application of Articles 46.2 (a) and 46.3 (b) of the GDPR. These articles address transfers of personal data from EEA public authorities or bodies to public bodies in third countries or to international organisations, where these transfers are not covered by an adequacy decision. The guidelines recommend which safeguards to implement in legally binding instruments (art. 46.2 (a)) or in administrative arrangements (Art. 46.3 (b)) to ensure that the level of protection of natural persons under the GDPR is met and not undermined. The guidelines will be submitted for public consultation.

Statement on privacy implications of mergers
Following the announcement of Google LLC’s intention to acquire Fitbit, the EDPB adopted a statement highlighting that the possible further combination and accumulation of sensitive personal data regarding people in Europe by a major tech company could entail a high level of risk to privacy and data protection. The EDPB reminds the parties to the proposed merger of their obligations under the GDPR and to conduct a full assessment of the data protection requirements and privacy implications of the merger in a transparent way. The Board urges the parties to mitigate possible risks to the rights to privacy and data protection before notifying the merger to the European Commission. The EDPB will consider any implications for the protection of personal data in the EEA and stands ready to contribute its advice to the EC if so requested.

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_02

18 February 2020

On February 18th and 19th, the eighteenth plenary session of the European Data Protection Board is taking place in Brussels. For further information, please consult the agenda.

Agenda of Eighteenth Plenary

30 January 2020

On January 28th and 29th, the EEA Data Protection Authorities and the European Data Protection Supervisor, assembled in the European Data Protection Board, met for their seventeenth plenary session. During the plenary, a wide range of topics was discussed.
 
The EDPB adopted its opinions on the Accreditation Requirements for Codes of Conduct Monitoring Bodies submitted to the Board by the Belgian, Spanish and French supervisory authorities (SAs). These opinions aim to ensure consistency and the correct application of the criteria among EEA SAs.

The EDPB adopted draft Guidelines on Connected Vehicles. As vehicles become increasingly more connected, the amount of data generated about drivers and passengers by these connected vehicles is growing rapidly. The EDPB guidelines focus on the processing of personal data in relation to the non-professional use of connected vehicles by data subjects. More specifically, the guidelines deal with the personal data processed by the vehicle and the data communicated by the vehicle as a connected device. The guidelines will be submitted for public consultation.

The Board adopted the final version of the Guidelines on the processing of Personal Data through Video Devices following public consultation. The guidelines aim to clarify how the GDPR applies to the processing of personal data when using video devices and to ensure the consistent application of the GDPR in this regard. The guidelines cover both traditional video devices and smart video devices. The guidelines address, among others, the lawfulness of processing, including the processing of special categories of data, the applicability of the household exemption and the disclosure of footage to third parties. Following public consultation, several amendments were made.

The EDPB adopted its opinions on the draft accreditation requirements for Certification Bodies submitted to the Board by the UK and Luxembourg SAs. These are the first opinions on accreditation requirements for Certification Bodies adopted by the Board. They aim to establish a consistent and harmonised approach regarding the requirements which SAs and national accreditation bodies will apply when accrediting certification bodies. 

The EDPB adopted its opinion on the draft decision regarding the Fujikura Automotive Europe Group’s Controller Binding Corporate Rules (BCRs), submitted to the Board by the Spanish Supervisory Authority.

Letter on unfair algorithms
The EDPB adopted a letter in response to MEP Sophie in’t Veld’s request concerning the use of unfair algorithms. The letter provides an analysis of the challenges posed by the use of algorithms, an overview of the relevant GDPR provisions and existing guidelines addressing these issues, and describes the work already undertaken by SAs.

Letter to the Council of Europe on the Cybercrime Convention
Following the Board’s contribution to the consultation process on the negotiation of a second additional protocol to the Council of Europe Convention on Cybercrime (Budapest Convention), several EDPB Members actively participated in the Council of Europe Cybercrime Committee’s (T-CY) Octopus Conference. The Board adopted a follow-up letter to the conference, stressing the need to integrate strong data protection safeguards into the future Additional Protocol to the Convention and to ensure its consistency with Convention 108, as well as with the EU Treaties and Charter of Fundamental Rights.

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_01

28 January 2020

On January 28th and 29th, the seventeenth plenary session of the European Data Protection Board is taking place in Brussels. For further information, please consult the agenda.

Agenda of Seventeenth Plenary