Det Europæiske Databeskyttelsesråd

Nyheder fra Databeskyttelsesrådet

20 November 2020

Brussels, 20 November - On November 19th, the EDPB met for its 42nd plenary session. During the plenary, the European Commission presented two new sets of draft Standard Contractual Clauses (SCCs) and the EDPB adopted a statement on the future ePrivacy Regulation.
 
The European Commission presented two draft SCCs: one set of SCCs for contracts between controllers and processors, and another one for data transfers outside the EU. The draft controller-processor SCCs are fully new and have been developed by the Commission in accordance with Art. 28 (7) GDPR and Art. 29 (7) of Regulation 2018/1725. These SCCs will have an EU-wide effect and aim to ensure full harmonisation and legal certainty across the EU when it comes to contracts between controllers and their processors. In addition, the Commission presented another set of SCCs for the transfer of personal data to third countries pursuant to Art. 46 (2) (c) GDPR. These SCCs will replace the existing SCCs for international transfers that were adopted on the basis of Directive 95/46 and needed to be updated to bring them in line with GDPR requirements, as well as with the CJEU’s ‘Schrems II’ ruling, and to better reflect the widespread use of new and more complex processing operations often involving multiple data importers and exporters. The Commission has requested a joint opinion from the EDPB and the EDPS on the implementing acts on both sets of SCCs.
 
EDPB Chair Andrea Jelinek said: “The new SCCs for the transfer of personal data to third countries have been highly anticipated, and it is important to point out that they are not a catch-all solution for data transfers post-Schrems II. While the updated SCCs are an important piece of the puzzle and a very important development, data exporters should still make the puzzle complete. The step-by-step approach of the EDPB recommendations on supplementary measures is necessary to bring the level of protection of the data transferred up to the EU standard of essential equivalence. Together with the EDPS, the Board will now thoroughly draft a joint opinion on the two sets of draft SCCs as invited by the European Commission.”
 
Recommendations 1/2020 on supplementary measures: During the plenary, the Members of the Board decided to extend the deadline for the public consultation on the Recommendations on measures that supplement transfer tools to ensure compliance with the EU level of protection of personal data from 30 November 2020 until 21 December 2020.

The EDPB adopted a statement on the future ePrivacy Regulation and the future role of supervisory authorities and the EDPB in this context. The EDPB expressed concerns about some new orientations of the discussions in the Council concerning the enforcement of the future ePrivacy Regulation, which could lead to fragmented supervision, procedural complexity and a lack of consistency and legal certainty for individuals and companies. The EDPB underlines that many of the provisions of the future ePrivacy Regulation concern processing of personal data and that many provisions of the GDPR and the ePrivacy Regulation are closely intertwined. Consistent interpretation and enforcement of both sets of rules, when covering personal data protection, would therefore be fulfilled in the most efficient way, if the enforcement of those parts of the ePrivacy Regulation and the GDPR would be entrusted to the same authority.
 
EDPB Chair Andrea Jelinek added: “The oversight of personal data processing activities under the ePrivacy Regulation should  be entrusted  to  the  same  national  authorities that are responsible for the enforcement of the GDPR. This will ensure a high level of data protection, guarantee a level playing field and ensure a harmonised interpretation and enforcement of the personal data processing elements of the ePrivacy Regulation across the EU.”
 
The EDPB also stressed the need to adopt the new Regulation as soon as possible.
 
The EDPB added that this statement is without prejudice to the Board’s previous positions, including its statement of March 2019 and May 2018 and reiterated that the future ePrivacy Regulation should under no circumstance lower the level of protection offered by the current ePrivacy Directive and should complement the GDPR by providing additional strong guarantees for confidentiality and protection of all types of electronic communications.

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_19

16 November 2020

***Registration has been closed***

On November 27, the EDPB is organising a remote stakeholder workshop on the topic of Legitimate Interest. Representatives from, among others, individual companies, sector organisations, NGOs, law firms and academia are welcome to express interest in attending.

Places will be allocated on a first come, first served basis, depending on availability. We will contact your organisation in case your registration has been successful.

Detailed information and the programme of the event will be available shortly.

As we would like to have a balanced and representative audience, participation will be limited to one participant per organisation.

When? November 27th 2020, from 10:00 - 16:00

11 November 2020

Brussels, 11 November - During its 41st plenary session, the EDPB adopted recommendations on measures that supplement transfer tools to ensure compliance with the EU level of protection of personal data, as well as recommendations on the European Essential Guarantees for surveillance measures. 

Both documents were adopted as a follow-up to the CJEU’s ‘Schrems II’ ruling. As a result of the ruling on July 16th, controllers  relying on Standard Contractual Clauses (SCCs) are required to verify, on a case-by-case basis and, where appropriate, in collaboration with the recipient of the data in the third country, if the law of the third country ensures a level of protection of the personal data transferred that is essentially equivalent to that guaranteed in the European Economic Area (EEA). The CJEU allowed exporters to add measures that are supplementary to the SCCs to ensure effective compliance with that level of protection where the safeguards contained in SCCs are not sufficient.   

The recommendations aim to assist controllers and processors acting as data exporters with their duty to identify and implement appropriate supplementary measures where they are needed to ensure an essentially equivalent level of protection to the data they transfer to third countries. In doing so, the EDPB seeks a consistent application of the GDPR and the Court’s ruling across the EEA. 

EDPB Chair, Andrea Jelinek said: “The EDPB is acutely aware of the impact of the Schrems II ruling on thousands of EU businesses and the important responsibility it places on data exporters. The EDPB hopes that these recommendations can help data exporters with identifying and implementing effective supplementary measures where they are needed. Our goal is to enable lawful transfers of personal data to third countries while guaranteeing that the data transferred is afforded a level of protection essentially equivalent to that guaranteed within the EEA.”  

The recommendations contain a roadmap of the steps data exporters must take to find out if they need to put in place supplementary measures to be able to transfer data outside the EEA in accordance with EU law, and help them identify those that could be effective. To assist data exporters, the recommendations also contain a non-exhaustive list of examples of supplementary measures and some of the conditions they would require to be effective. 

However, in the end data exporters are responsible for making the concrete assessment in the context of the transfer, the third country law and the transfer tool they are relying on. Data exporters must proceed with due diligence and document their process thoroughly, as they will be held accountable to the decisions they take on that basis, in line with the GDPR principle of accountability. Moreover, data exporters should know that it may not be possible to implement sufficient supplementary measures in every case.

The recommendations on the supplementary measures will be submitted to public consultation. They will be applicable immediately following their publication. 

In addition, the EDPB adopted recommendations on the European Essential Guarantees for surveillance measures. The recommendations on the European Essential Guarantees are complementary to the recommendations on supplementary measures. The European Essential Guarantees recommendations provide data exporters with elements to determine if the legal framework governing public authorities’ access to data for surveillance purposes in third countries can be regarded as a justifiable interference with the rights to privacy and the protection of personal data, and therefore as not impinging on the commitments of the Article 46 GDPR transfer tool the data exporter and importer rely on.

The Chair added: “The implications of the Schrems II judgment extend to all transfers to third countries. Therefore, there are no quick fixes, nor a one-size-fits-all solution for all transfers, as this would be ignoring the wide diversity of situations data exporters face. Data exporters will need to evaluate their data processing operations and transfers and take effective measures bearing in mind the legal order of the third countries to which they transfer or intend to transfer data.”

The EEA data protection supervisory authorities will continue coordinating their actions in the EDPB to ensure consistency in the application of EU data protection law. 

The agenda of the forty-first plenary is available here.

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_18

10 November 2020

Brussels, 10 November - During its 41st plenary session, the EDPB adopted by a 2/3 majority of its members its first dispute resolution decision on the basis of Art. 65 GDPR. The binding decision seeks to address the dispute arisen following a draft decision issued by the Irish SA as lead supervisory authority (LSA) regarding Twitter International Company and the subsequent relevant and reasoned objections (RROs) expressed by a number of concerned supervisory authorities (CSAs). 

The Irish SA issued the draft decision following an own-volition inquiry and investigations into Twitter International Company, after the company notified the Irish SA of a personal data breach on 8 January 2019. In May 2020, the Irish SA shared its draft decision with the CSAs in accordance with Art. 60 (3) GDPR. The CSAs then had four weeks to submit their RROs. Among others, the CSAs issued RROs on the infringements of the GDPR identified by the LSA, the role of Twitter International Company as the (sole) data controller, and the quantification of the proposed fine. 

As the LSA rejected the objections and/or considered they were not “relevant and reasoned”, it referred the matter to the EDPB in accordance with Art 60 (4) GDPR, thereby initiating the dispute resolution procedure. 

Following the submission by the LSA, the completeness of the file was assessed, resulting in the formal launch of the Art. 65 procedure on 8 September 2020. In compliance with Article 65 (3) GDPR and in conjunction with Article 11.4 of the EDPB Rules of Procedure, the default adoption timeline of one month was extended by a further month because of the complexity of the subject matter. 

On 9 November 2020, the EDPB adopted its binding decision and will shortly notify it formally to the Irish SA. 

The Irish SA shall adopt its final decision on the basis of the EDPB decision, which will be addressed to the controller, without undue delay and at the latest one month after the EDPB has notified its decision. The LSA and CSAs shall notify the EDPB of the date the final decision was notified to the controller. Following this notification, the EDPB will publish its decision on its website.

For further information see: Art. 65 FAQ

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_17

21 October 2020

Bruxelles, den 21. oktober — Den 20. oktober afholdt Databeskyttelsesrådet sit 40. plenarmøde. En lang række emner blev drøftet.

Efter en offentlig høring vedtog Databeskyttelsesrådet en endelig udgave af retningslinjerne for databeskyttelse gennem design og standardindstillinger. Retningslinjerne fokuserer på forpligtelsen til at sikre databeskyttelse gennem design og standardindstillinger som fastlagt i artikel 25 i databeskyttelsesforordningen. Den centrale forpligtelse, jf. artikel 25, er at sikre effektiv gennemførelse af databeskyttelsesprincipperne og de registreredes rettigheder og friheder gennem både design og standardindstillinger. Det vil sige, at de dataansvarlige skal gennemføre passende tekniske og organisatoriske foranstaltninger og tilvejebringe fornødne garantier, der er udformet med henblik på at sikre databeskyttelsesprincippernes praktiske gennemførelse og på at beskytte de registreredes rettigheder og frihedsrettigheder. Desuden bør de dataansvarlige kunne påvise, at de gennemførte foranstaltninger er effektive.

Retningslinjerne indeholder også en vejledning i, hvordan databeskyttelsesprincipperne i artikel 5 i databeskyttelsesforordningen gennemføres effektivt, og opstiller vigtige designelementer og standardelementer samt praktiske eksempler. De indeholder endvidere anbefalinger om, hvordan dataansvarlige, databehandlere og producenter kan samarbejde om at opnå databeskyttelse gennem design og gennem standardindstillinger.

Ordlyden i de endelige retningslinjer er fornyet, og den retlige begrundelse er udbygget for at tage højde for kommentarer og feedback, der er modtaget under den offentlige høring.

Databeskyttelsesrådet besluttede at opstille rammer for koordineret håndhævelse. Rammerne for koordineret håndhævelse sikrer en velstruktureret koordinering af tilbagevendende årlige aktiviteter hos Databeskyttelsesrådets tilsynsmyndigheder. Meningen med rammerne for koordineret håndhævelse er, at de på en fleksibel og velkoordineret måde skal lette fælles aktioner, lige fra fælles oplysnings- og informationsindsamlingstiltag til kontrolaktioner og fælles undersøgelser. Formålet med de tilbagevendende årlige koordinerede aktioner er at fremme overholdelsen, at sætte de registrerede i stand til at udøve deres rettigheder og at skabe øget bevidsthed.

Databeskyttelsesrådet vedtog en skrivelse som svar til Europäische Akademie für Informationsfreiheit und Datenschutz vedrørende følgerne for databeskyttelsen af artikel 17 i direktivet om ophavsret, navnlig i henseende til uploadfiltre. I skrivelsen erklærer Databeskyttelsesrådet, at enhver behandling af personoplysninger med henblik på uploadfiltre skal være forholdsmæssig og nødvendig, og at personoplysninger så vidt muligt ikke bør behandles, hvor artikel 17 i direktivet om ophavsret gennemføres. Når behandlingen af personoplysninger er nødvendig, f.eks. i forbindelse med søgsmålsmekanismen, bør sådanne oplysninger kun vedrøre oplysninger, der er nødvendige for dette specifikke formål, idet alle de øvrige principper i databeskyttelsesforordningen anvendes. Databeskyttelsesrådet fremhævede endvidere, at det er i løbende dialog med Kommissionen omkring dette emne, og at det har tilkendegivet sin interesse i et videre samarbejde.

Bemærkning til redaktører:
Bemærk, at alle dokumenter, der vedtages på Databeskyttelsesrådets plenarmøde, undergår de nødvendige kontroller af juridisk, sproglig og formateringsmæssig art og vil blive gjort tilgængelige på Databeskyttelsesrådets websted, når disse er afsluttet.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_16

12 October 2020

Bruxelles, den 12. oktober — På sin 39. plenarforsamling vedtog Det Europæiske Databeskyttelsesråd retningslinjer for begrebet relevant og begrundet indsigelse. Retningslinjerne vil bidrage til en ensartet fortolkning af begrebet, hvilket vil medvirke til at strømline de fremtidige procedurer i henhold til artikel 65 i databeskyttelsesforordningen.

Inden for rammerne af den samarbejdsmekanisme, der er fastsat i databeskyttelsesforordningen, har tilsynsmyndighederne pligt til at "udveksle alle relevante oplysninger med hinanden" og samarbejde "med henblik på at nå til enighed". I henhold til databeskyttelsesforordningens artikel 60, stk. 3 og 4, skal den ledende tilsynsmyndighed forelægge et udkast til afgørelse for de berørte tilsynsmyndigheder, som derefter kan fremsætte en relevant og begrundet indsigelse inden for en bestemt tidsramme. Når der er fremsat en relevant og begrundet indsigelse, har den ledende tilsynsmyndighed to muligheder. Hvis den ikke følger den relevante og begrundede indsigelse eller er af den opfattelse, at indsigelsen ikke er begrundet eller relevant, forelægger den sagen for Databeskyttelsesrådet inden for rammerne af sammenhængsmekanismen (artikel 65 i databeskyttelsesforordningen). Hvis den ledende tilsynsmyndighed derimod følger indsigelsen og afgiver det reviderede udkast til afgørelse, kan den berørte tilsynsmyndighed fremsætte en relevant og begrundet indsigelse mod det reviderede udkast til afgørelse inden for to uger.

Formålet med retningslinjerne er at skabe en fælles forståelse af begrebet "relevante og begrundede", herunder hvad der skal tages i betragtning ved vurderingen af, om en indsigelse "klart påviser betydningen af de risici, som udkastet til afgørelse udgør" (artikel 4, stk. 24, i databeskyttelsesforordningen).

Bemærkning til redaktører:

Bemærk, at alle dokumenter, der vedtages på Databeskyttelsesrådets plenarmøde, undergår de nødvendige kontroller af juridisk, sproglig og formateringsmæssig art og gøres tilgængelige på Databeskyttelsesrådets websted, når disse er afsluttet.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_15

04 September 2020

Bruxelles, den 3. september — Databeskyttelsesrådet vedtog retningslinjer for begreberne dataansvarlig og databehandler i den generelle forordning om databeskyttelse og retningslinjer for målretning mod brugere af sociale medier. Derudover oprettede Databeskyttelsesrådet en taskforce for klager som følge af EU-Domstolens Schrems II-dom og en taskforce for supplerende foranstaltninger, som dataeksportører og -importører kan blive pålagt at træffe, for at sikre tilstrækkelig beskyttelse ved overførsel af data i lyset af EU-Domstolens Schrems II-dom.

Databeskyttelsesrådet vedtog retningslinjer for begreberne dataansvarlig og databehandler i den generelle forordning om databeskyttelse. Siden den generelle forordning om databeskyttelse trådte i kraft, er der blevet rejst spørgsmål om, i hvilket omfang den generelle forordning om databeskyttelse har medført ændringer af disse begreber, navnlig med hensyn til begrebet fælles dataansvar (jf. artikel 26 i den generelle forordning om databeskyttelse og efter flere Domstols-afgørelser) og databehandleres forpligtelser (navnlig artikel 28 i den generelle forordning om databeskyttelse), som er fastsat i kapitel IV i den generelle forordning om databeskyttelse.

I marts 2019 afholdt Det Europæiske Databeskyttelsesråd sammen med sit sekretariat et arrangement for interessenter. Arrangementet gjorde det klart, at der var behov for mere praktisk vejledning, og gav Databeskyttelsesrådet mulighed for bedre at forstå behovene og bekymringerne på området. De nye retningslinjer består af to hoveddele. Den ene del forklarer de forskellige begreber. Den anden del indeholder en detaljeret vejledning om, hvilken betydning begreberne primært har for dataansvarlige, databehandlere og fælles dataansvarlige. Retningslinjerne indeholder et flowdiagram, som skal give yderligere praktisk vejledning. Retningslinjerne vil blive sendt ud til offentlig høring.

Databeskyttelsesrådet vedtog retningslinjer for målretning mod brugere af sociale medier. Retningslinjerne har til formål at yde praktisk vejledning til interessenter og indeholder flere eksempler på forskellige situationer, så de berørte parter hurtigt kan identificere det "scenarie", der er tættest på den målretningstilgang, de har til hensigt at anvende. Hovedformålet med retningslinjerne er at præcisere roller og ansvarsområder for udbydere af sociale medier og de personer, de retter sig mod. Retningslinjerne identificerer derfor bl.a. de potentielle risici for den enkeltes frihedsrettigheder, de vigtigste aktører og deres roller, anvendelsen af centrale databeskyttelseskrav, såsom lovlighed og gennemsigtighed, og konsekvensanalyser vedrørende databeskyttelse samt centrale elementer af ordninger mellem udbydere af sociale medier og de personer, de retter sig mod. Desuden fokuserer retningslinjerne på de forskellige målretningsmekanismer, behandlingen af særlige kategorier af oplysninger og forpligtelsen for fælles dataansvarlige til at indføre en passende ordning i henhold til databeskyttelsesforordningens artikel 26. Plenarforsamlingen vil sende retningslinjerne ud til offentlig høring.

Databeskyttelsesrådet har oprettet en taskforce, som skal kigge nærmere på klager, der er indgivet som følge af Domstolen dom i Schrems II-sagen. Der er indgivet i alt 101 identiske klager til databeskyttelsesmyndigheder i EØS-landene over flere af landenes dataansvarlige i forbindelse med måden, hvorpå de anvender Google-/Facebook-tjenester, som omfatter videregivelse af personoplysninger. Navnlig de klagere, der blev repræsenteret af NGO'en NOYB, hævder, at Google/Facebook videregiver personoplysninger til USA på grundlag af EU-USA-privatlivsskjoldet eller standardkontraktbestemmelser, og at den dataansvarlige ifølge Domstolens seneste dom i sag C-311/18 ikke er i stand til at sikre tilstrækkelig beskyttelse af klagernes personoplysninger. Taskforcen vil analysere sagen og sikre et tæt samarbejde mellem medlemmerne af Databeskyttelsesrådet.

Som opfølgning på Domstolens dom i Schrems II-sagen og i tillæg til dokumentet med ofte stillede spørgsmål, der blev vedtaget den 23. juli, har Databeskyttelsesrådet oprettet en taskforce. Taskforcen vil udarbejde henstillinger, som skal hjælpe dataansvarlige og databehandlere i deres arbejde med at identificere og gennemføre passende supplerende foranstaltninger for at sikre tilstrækkelig beskyttelse i forbindelse med videregivelse af oplysninger til tredjelande.

Formand for Databeskyttelsesrådet Andrea Jelinek udtaler: "Det Europæiske Databeskyttelsesråd er godt klar over, at Schrems II-dommen pålægger dataansvarlige et vigtigt ansvar. Ud over udtalelsen og dokumentet med de ofte stillede spørgsmål, som vi offentliggjorde kort tid efter dommen, vil vi udarbejde henstillinger til hjælp for dataansvarlige og databehandlere i deres arbejde med at identificere og gennemføre passende supplerende juridiske, tekniske og organisatoriske foranstaltninger, der skal sikre et beskyttelsesniveau, der svarer til standarden "væsentlig overensstemmelse", ved overførsel af personoplysninger til tredjelande. Konsekvenserne af dommen er imidlertid vidtrækkende, og der er mange forskellige forhold, der gør sig gældende for overførsel af oplysninger til tredjelande. Vi kan derfor ikke finde en hurtig løsning, som kan bruges i alle situationer. Hver organisation skal evaluere sine egne databehandlingsaktiviteter og overførsler og træffe passende foranstaltninger."

Bemærkning til redaktører:
Bemærk, at alle dokumenter, der vedtages på Databeskyttelsesrådets plenarmøde, undergår de nødvendige kontroller af juridisk, sproglig og formateringsmæssig art og vil blive gjort tilgængelige på Databeskyttelsesrådets websted, når disse er afsluttet.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_14

24 July 2020

Det Europæiske Databeskyttelsesråd offentliggør et dokument med ofte stillede spørgsmål vedrørende EU-Domstolens dom i sag C-311/18 (Schrems II)

Som følge af Den Europæiske Unions Domstols dom i sag C-311/18 — Data Protection Commissioner mod Facebook Ireland Ltd og Maximillian Schrems — har Det Europæiske Databeskyttelsesråd vedtaget et dokument med ofte stillede spørgsmål, som indeholder en indledende præcisering og en foreløbig vejledning til berørte parter om brugen af retlige instrumenter til overførsel af personoplysninger til tredjelande, herunder USA. Dette dokument vil sammen med yderligere vejledning blive bearbejdet yderligere og suppleret, eftersom Det Europæiske Databeskyttelsesråd fortsætter med at undersøge og vurdere Domstolens dom. 

Dokumentet med ofte stillede spørgsmål vedrørende EU-Domstolens dom i sag C-311/18 findes her.

EDPB_Pressemeddelelse_udtalelse_2020_06

23 July 2020

Bruxelles, den 23. juli — På baggrund af den forestående afslutning af brexit-overgangsperioden har Databeskyttelsesrådet vedtaget en orienterende note om foranstaltninger, som tilsynsmyndigheder, indehavere af godkendte bindende virksomhedsregler og organisationer, der venter på at få deres virksomhedsregler godkendt af den britiske tilsynsmyndighed, skal træffe for at sikre, at disse bindende virksomhedsregler stadig kan anvendes som et gyldigt overførselsredskab efter udløbet af overgangsperioden. Da den britiske tilsynsmyndighed ikke længere betragtes som kompetent tilsynsmyndighed i henhold til GDPR ved udløbet af overgangsperioden, vil de afgørelser om godkendelse, der er truffet af den britiske tilsynsmyndighed i henhold til GDPR, ikke længere have retsvirkning i EØS-området. Desuden kan det være nødvendigt at ændre indholdet af de pågældende bindende virksomhedsregler inden overgangsperiodens udløb, da disse regler generelt indeholder henvisninger til den britiske retsorden. Dette gælder også bindende virksomhedsregler, der allerede er godkendt i henhold til direktiv 94/46/EF.

De, der har fået deres bindende virksomhedsregler godkendt, og som har den britiske tilsynsmyndighed som ledende tilsynsmyndighed for deres bindende virksomhedsregler, skal træffe organisatoriske foranstaltninger for at udpege en ny ledende tilsynsmyndighed for bindende virksomhedsregler i EØS-området. Ændringen af den ledende tilsynsmyndighed for bindende virksomhedsregler skal ske inden udløbet af brexit-overgangsperioden.

De, der endnu ikke har fået deres ansøgning om godkendelse af bindende virksomhedsregler godtaget, opfordres til at træffe alle organisatoriske foranstaltninger for at udpege en ny ledende tilsynsmyndighed for bindende virksomhedsregler i EØS-området i god tid inden udløbet af brexit-overgangsperioden. Det indbefatter, at de skal kontakte den pågældende tilsynsmyndighed for at give alle de nødvendige oplysninger om, hvorfor de vil have den tilsynsmyndighed som ny ledende tilsynsmyndighed for bindende virksomhedsregler. Sidstnævnte vil derefter overtage ansøgningen og formelt indlede en godkendelsesprocedure, der vil blive genstand for en udtalelse fra Databeskyttelsesrådet. Alle bindende virksomhedsregler, der er godkendt af den britiske tilsynsmyndighed i henhold til GDPR, vil kræve, at den nye ledende EØS-tilsynsmyndighed for bindende virksomhedsregler træffer en ny godkendelsesbeslutning inden overgangsperioden udløber, efterfulgt af en udtalelse fra Databeskyttelsesrådet. Databeskyttelsesrådet har også vedtaget et bilag med en tjekliste over elementer, der skal ændres i dokumenterne om bindende virksomhedsregler i forbindelse med brexit.

Denne orienterende note berører ikke Databeskyttelsesrådets igangværende analyse af, hvilke konsekvenser EU-Domstolens dom Data protection commissioner mod Facebook Ireland og Schrems får for bindende virksomhedsregler som overførselsredskaber.

EDPB_Pressemeddelelse_2020_13

20 July 2020

Bruxelles, den 20. juli — På det 34. plenarmøde vedtog Databeskyttelsesrådet en udtalelse om EU-Domstolens afgørelse i sagen Facebook Ireland mod Schrems. Udvalget vedtog retningslinjer for samspillet mellem det andet betalingstjenestedirektiv og GDPR samt et svar til Ďuriš Nicholsonová, MEP, om kontaktsporing, interoperabilitet mellem apps og konsekvensanalyser vedrørende databeskyttelse.

Databeskyttelsesrådet vedtog en udtalelse om Den Europæiske Unions Domstols dom i sag C-311/18 – Data Protection Commissioner mod Facebook Ireland og Maximillian Schrems. Udtalelsen ugyldiggør afgørelse 2016/1250 om tilstrækkeligheden af den beskyttelse, der opnås ved hjælp af EU's og USA's værn om privatlivets fred, og slår fast, at Kommissionens afgørelse 2010/87 om standardkontraktbestemmelser for videregivelse af personoplysninger til registerførere etableret i tredjelande er gyldig.

Med hensyn til værnet om privatlivets fred påpeger Databeskyttelsesrådet, at EU og USA i henhold til dommen bør etablere fuldstændige og effektive rammer, som sikrer, at det beskyttelsesniveau, der gælder for personlige data i USA, i det væsentlige svarer til det niveau, som garanteres inden for EU, jf. EU-domstolens dom. Databeskyttelsesrådet har til hensigt fortsat at spille en konstruktiv rolle med henblik på at sikre en transatlantisk overførsel af personlige oplysninger, som er til gavn for statsborgere og organisationer i EØS, og er klar til at støtte og rådgive Europa-Kommissionen i sit arbejde med sammen med USA at etablere nye rammer, som efterlever EU's databeskyttelseslovgivning fuldt ud.

Hvad angår standardkontraktbestemmelser noterer Databeskyttelsesrådet sig, at når dataeksportører og dataimportører overvejer at anvende standardkontraktbestemmelser, er deres primære ansvar at sikre, at bestemmelserne sikrer et beskyttelsesniveau, der i det væsentlige svarer til det beskyttelsesniveau, der garanteres ved den generelle forordning om databeskyttelse på baggrund af EU's charter. Når en sådan forudgående vurdering udføres, skal dataeksportøren (om nødvendigt med importørens hjælp) tage højde for indholdet i standardkontraktbestemmelserne, de særlige omstændigheder i forbindelse med overførslen samt den gældende lovgivning i dataimportørens land. Domstolen understreger, at dataeksportøren kan være nødt til at overveje at indføre yderligere foranstaltninger end dem, der indgår i standardkontraktbestemmelserne. Databeskyttelsesrådet vil undersøge, hvad disse supplerende foranstaltninger kunne bestå i.

Databeskyttelsesrådet noterer sig også de ansvarlige tilsynsmyndigheders pligt til at suspendere eller forbyde en overførsel af oplysninger til et tredjeland i henhold til standardkontraktbestemmelserne, hvis det efter tilsynsmyndighedens skøn og i lyset af samtlige de omstændigheder, der kendetegner denne videregivelse, er tilfældet, at bestemmelserne ikke er overholdt eller ikke kan overholdes i dette tredjeland, og at det ikke er muligt ved andre midler at sikre beskyttelsen af de overførte oplysninger, især hvis den registeransvarlige eller databehandleren ikke allerede selv har suspenderet overførslen eller bragt den til ophør.

Databeskyttelsesrådet minder om, at det har vedtaget retningslinjer for undtagelser fra artikel 49 i GDPR, og at sådanne undtagelser skal anvendes fra sag til sag.

Databeskyttelsesrådet vil gennemgå dommen nøje og komme med yderligere præciseringer til de berørte parter samt vejledning om brugen af instrumenter til overførsel af personoplysninger i henhold til dommen. Som fastslået i EU-Domstolens dom står Databeskyttelsesrådet og de europæiske tilsynsmyndigheder også klar til at sikre overensstemmelsen i hele EØS-området.

Udtalelsen i sin helhed findes her: https://edpb.europa.eu/news//2020/statement-court-justice-european-union-judgment-case-c-31118-data-protection_en

Databeskyttelsesrådet vedtog retningslinjer for det andet betalingstjenestedirektiv. Det andet betalingstjenestedirektiv moderniserer de retlige rammer for markedet for betalingstjenester. Det er vigtigt at bemærke, at det andet betalingstjenestedirektiv indfører en retlig ramme for nye betalingsinitieringstjenester (PISP) og kontooplysningstjenester (AISP). Brugere kan anmode om, at disse nye udbydere af betalingstjenester får adgang til deres betalingskonti. Efter en workshop for interessenter i februar 2019 udarbejdede Databeskyttelsesrådet retningslinjer for anvendelsen af GDPR på disse nye betalingstjenester.

I følge retningslinjerne er behandlingen af særlige kategorier af data i denne sammenhæng generelt forbudt (jf. artikel 9, stk. 1, i GDPR), med mindre den registrerede udtrykkeligt har givet sit samtykke (artikel 9, stk. 2, litra a, i GDPR), eller behandlingen er nødvendig af hensyn til væsentlige samfundsinteresser (artikel 9, stk. 2, litra g), i GDPR).

Retningslinjerne omhandler også de betingelser, under hvilke kontoførende betalingstjenesteudbydere giver udbydere af betalingsinitieringstjenester og udbydere af kontooplysningstjenester adgang til oplysninger om betalingskonti, navnlig granulær adgang til betalingskonti.

Det præciseres i retningslinjerne, at hverken artikel 66, stk. 3, litra g), eller artikel 67, stk. 2, litra f), i det andet betalingstjenestedirektiv tillader yderligere behandling, medmindre den registrerede har givet sit samtykke i henhold til artikel 6, stk. 1, litra a), i GDPR, eller behandlingen er fastsat i EU-retten eller medlemsstatslovgivning. Retningslinjerne vil blive fremlagt til offentlig høring.

Endelig vedtog udvalget et brev som svar på spørgsmål stillet af Ďuriš Nicholsonová, MEP, vedrørende databeskyttelse i forbindelse med bekæmpelsen af covid-19. Brevet omhandler spørgsmål om harmonisering og interoperabilitet af sporingsapps, kravet om en konsekvensanalyse vedrørende databeskyttelse for databehandling i tilknytning hertil og den mulige varighed af behandlingen.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_12

17 July 2020


The European Data Protection Board has adopted the following statement:


The EDPB welcomes the CJEU’s judgment, which highlights the fundamental right to privacy in the context of the transfer of personal data to third countries. The CJEU’s decision is one of great importance. The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) has taken note of the fact that the Court of Justice invalidates Decision 2016/1250 on the adequacy of the protection provided by the EU-US Privacy Shield, and of the fact that it considers Commission Decision 2010/87 on Standard Contractual Clauses (SCCs) for the transfer of personal data to processors established in third countries valid.


The EDPB discussed the Court’s ruling during its 34th plenary session of 17 July 2020.


With regard to the Privacy Shield, the EDPB points out that the EU and the U.S. should achieve a complete and effective framework guaranteeing that the level of protection granted to personal data in the U.S. is essentially equivalent to that guaranteed within the EU, in line with the judgment.


The EDPB identified in the past some of the main flaws of the Privacy Shield on which the CJEU grounds its decision to declare it invalid.


The EDPB questioned in its reports on the annual joint reviews of Privacy Shield the compliance with the data protection principles of necessity and proportionality in the application of U.S. law. (1)


The EDPB intends to continue playing a constructive part in securing a transatlantic transfer of personal data that benefits EEA citizens and organisations and stands ready to provide the European Commission with assistance and guidance to help it build, together with the U.S., a new framework that fully complies with EU data protection law.


While the SCCs remain valid, the CJEU underlines the need to ensure that these maintain, in practice, a level of protection that is essentially equivalent to the one guaranteed by the GDPR in light of the EU Charter. The assessment of whether the countries to which data are sent offer adequate protection is primarily the responsibility of the exporter and the importer, when considering whether to enter into SCCs. When performing such prior assessment, the exporter (if necessary, with the assistance of the importer) shall take into consideration the content of the SCCs, the specific circumstances of the transfer, as well as the legal regime applicable in the importer’s country. The examination of the latter shall be done in light of the non-exhaustive factors set out under Art 45(2) GDPR.


If the result of this assessment is that the country of the importer does not provide an essentially equivalent level of protection, the exporter may have to consider putting in place additional measures to those included in the SCCs. The EDPB is looking further into what these additional measures could consist of.


The CJEU’s judgment also recalls the importance for the exporter and importer to comply with their obligations included in the SCCs, in particular the information obligations in relation to change of legislation in the importer’s country. When those contractual obligations are not or cannot be complied with, the exporter is bound by the SCCs to suspend the transfer or terminate the SCCs or to notify its competent supervisory authority if it intends to continue transferring data.


The EDPB takes note of the duties for the competent supervisory authorities (SAs) to suspend or prohibit a transfer of data to a third country pursuant to SCCs, if, in the view of the competent SA and in the light of all the circumstances of that transfer, those clauses are not or cannot be complied with in that third country, and the protection of the data transferred cannot be ensured by other means, in particular where the controller or a processor has not already itself suspended or put an end to the transfer.


The EDPB recalls that it issued guidelines on Art 49 GDPR derogations (2); and that such derogations must be applied on a case-by-case basis.


The EDPB will assess the judgment in more detail and provide further clarification for stakeholders and guidance on the use of instruments for the transfer of personal data to third countries pursuant to the judgment.


The EDPB and its European SAs stand ready, as stated by the CJEU, to ensure consistency across the EEA.


For the European Data Protection Board


The Chair


(Andrea Jelinek)

 

(1) See EDPB, EU-U.S. Privacy Shield  - Second Annual Joint Review report here, and  EDPB, EU -U.S. Privacy Shield   - Third Annual Joint Review report here.

(2) DPB Guidelines 2/2018 on derogations of Article 49 under Regulation 2016/679, adopted on 25 May 2018, p3.

 

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2020_05

25 June 2020

The EDPB has published a new register containing decisions taken by national supervisory authorities following the One-Stop-Shop cooperation procedure (Art. 60 GDPR) on its website.


Under the GDPR, Supervisory Authorities have a duty to cooperate on cases with a cross-border component to ensure a consistent application of the regulation - the so-called one-stop-shop (OSS) mechanism. Under the OSS, the Lead Supervisory Authority (LSA) is in charge of preparing the draft decisions and works together with the concerned SAs to reach consensus. Up until early June, LSAs have adopted 110 final OSS decisions. The register includes access to the decisions as well as  summaries of the decisions in English prepared by the EDPB Secretariat. The register will be valuable to data protection practitioners who will gain access to information showcasing how SAs work together to enforce the GDPR in practice. The information in the register has been validated by the LSAs in question and in accordance with the conditions provided by its national legislation.

The register is accessible here

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2020_04

17 June 2020

During its 32nd plenary session, the EDPB adopted a statement on the interoperability of contact tracing apps, as well as a statement on the opening of borders and data protection rights. The Board also adopted two letters to MEP Körner - on encryption and on Article 25 GDPR - and a letter to CEAOB on PCAOB arrangements.

The EDPB adopted a statement on the interoperability of contact tracing applications, building on the EDPB Guidelines 04/2020 on the use of location data and contact tracing tools in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak. The statement offers a more in-depth analysis of key aspects, including transparency, legal basis, controllership, data subject rights, data retention and minimisation, information security and data accuracy in the context of creating an interoperable network of applications, that need to be considered on top of those highlighted in the EDPB Guidelines 04/2020.

The EDPB emphasises that the sharing of data about individuals that have been diagnosed or tested positively with such interoperable applications should only be triggered by a voluntary action of the user. Giving data subjects information and control will increase their trust in the solutions and their potential uptake. The goal of interoperability should not be used as an argument to extend the collection of personal data beyond what is necessary.

Moreover, contact tracing apps need to be part of a comprehensive public health strategy to fight the pandemic, such as testing and subsequent manual contact tracing for the purpose of improving effectiveness of the performed measures.

Ensuring interoperability is not only technically challenging and sometimes impossible without disproportionate trade-offs, but also leads to a potential increased data protection risk. Therefore, controllers need to ensure measures are effective and proportionate and must assess whether a less intrusive alternative can achieve the same purpose.

The EDPB adopted a statement on the processing of personal data in the context of reopening the Schengen borders following the COVID-19 outbreak. The measures allowing a safe reopening of the borders currently envisaged or implemented by Member States include testing for COVID-19, requiring certificates issued by health professionals and the use of a voluntary contact tracing app. Most measures involve processing of personal data.

The EDPB recalls that data protection legislation remains applicable and allows for an efficient response to the pandemic, while at the same time protecting fundamental rights and freedoms. The EDPB stresses that the processing of personal data must be necessary and proportionate, and the level of protection should be consistent throughout the EEA. In the statement, the EDPB urges the Member States to take a common European approach when deciding which processing of personal data is necessary in this context.

The statement also addresses the GDPR principles that Member States need to pay special attention to when processing personal data in the context of reopening the border. These include lawfulness, fairness and transparency, purpose limitation, data minimisation, storage limitation, security of data and data protection by design and by default. Moreover, the decision to allow the entrance into a country should not only be based on the automated individual decision making technologies. In any case, such decisions should be subject to suitable safeguards, which should include specific information to the data subject and the right to obtain human intervention, to express his or her point of view, to obtain an explanation of the decision reached after such assessment and to challenge the decision. Automated individual decision measures should not apply to children.

Finally, the EDPB highlights the importance of a prior consultation with competent national supervisory authorities when Member States intend to process personal data in this context.

The EDPB adopted a response to a letter from MEP Moritz Körner on the relevance of encryption bans in third countries for assessing the level of data protection when personal data are transferred to countries where these bans exist. According to the EDPB, any ban on encryption or provisions weakening encryption would seriously undermine compliance with GDPR security obligations applicable to controllers and processors, be that in a third country or in the EEA. Security measures are one of the elements the European Commission must take into account when assessing the adequacy of the level of protection in a third country.

A second letter to MEP Körner addresses the topic of laptop camera covers. MEP Körner highlighted that this technology could help comply with the GDPR and suggested new laptops should be equipped with it. In its reply, the Board clarifies that while laptop manufacturers should be encouraged to take into account the right to data protection when developing and designing such products, they are not responsible for the processing carried out with those products and the GDPR does not establish legal obligations for manufacturers, unless they also act as controllers or processors. Controllers must evaluate the risks of each processing and choose the appropriate safeguards to comply with GDPR, including the privacy by design and by default enshrined in Article 25 GDPR.

Finally, the EDPB adopted a letter to the Committee of European Auditor Oversight Bodies (CEAOB). The EDPB received a proposal from the CEAOB, which gathers the national auditor oversight bodies at EU level, to cooperate and receive feedback on negotiations of draft administrative arrangements for the transfer of data to the US Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB). The EDPB welcomes this proposal and indicates that it is available to hold an exchange with the CEAOB to clarify any potential questions on data protection requirements related to such arrangements in light of the EDPB Guidelines 2/2020 on Art. 46 (2) (a) and 46 (3) (b) GDPR for transfers of personal data between EEA and non-EEA public authorities. The exchange could also involve the PCAOB if the CEAOB and its members deem it beneficial for their work on these arrangements.

The agenda of the 32nd plenary is available here

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_11

10 June 2020

Bruxelles, den 10. juni — Databeskyttelsesrådet besluttede på sit 31. plenarmøde at oprette en taskforce, der får til opgave at koordinere eventuelle tiltag og skaffe et mere omfattende overblik over TikToks behandling af personoplysninger og deres praksis desangående i EU, og vedtog et brev om retshåndhævende myndigheders brug af Clearview AI. Derudover vedtog Databeskyttelsesrådet et svar til ENISA-Rådgivningsgruppen og et brev som svar på et åbent brev fra NOYB.

Databeskyttelsesrådet meddelte, at det havde besluttet at oprette en taskforce med det formål at koordinere eventuelle tiltag og skaffe et mere omfattende overblik over TikToks behandling af personoplysninger og deres praksis desangående i EU.

Som svar på Europa-Parlamentsmedlem Körners anmodning vedrørende TikTok anfører Databeskyttelsesrådet, at det allerede har udstukket retningslinjer og fremsat henstillinger, der bør tages i betragtning af alle dataansvarlige, hvis behandling er underlagt GDPR, navnlig i forbindelse med videregivelse af personoplysninger til tredjelande, materielle og proceduremæssige betingelser for offentlige myndigheders adgang til personoplysninger eller det territoriale anvendelsesområde for GDPR, især i relation til behandling af mindreåriges oplysninger. Databeskyttelsesrådet minder om, at GDPR gælder for dataansvarliges behandling af personoplysninger, også selv om disse ikke er etableret i EU, hvor behandlingen vedrører udbydelsen af varer eller tjenesteydelser til registrerede i EU.

I sit svar til medlemmerne af Europa-Parlamentet vedrørende Clearview AI delte Databeskyttelsesrådet sin bekymring over udviklingen inden for teknologier til ansigtsgenkendelse. Databeskyttelsesrådet minder om, at de retshåndhævende myndigheder i henhold til direktiv (EU) 2016/680 (retshåndhævelsesdirektivet) kan behandle biometriske oplysninger med det formål entydigt at identificere en fysisk person alene under overholdelse af de strenge betingelser i artikel 8 og 10 i retshåndhævelsesdirektivet.

Databeskyttelsesrådet er i tvivl om, hvorvidt EU-retten eller medlemsstaternes nationale lovgivning giver retsgrundlag for at benytte en tjeneste som den, der udbydes af Clearview AI. Derfor kan lovligheden af retshåndhævende myndigheders brug i EU ikke fastslås på det nuværende grundlag, med forbehold for fremtidige eller igangværende undersøgelser.

Med forbehold for yderligere analyse baseret på nye elementer er det derfor Databeskyttelsesrådets opfattelse, at de retshåndhævende myndigheders brug af en tjeneste som f.eks. Clearview AI i Den Europæiske Union i den foreliggende situation sandsynligvis ikke ville være forenelig med EU's databeskyttelsesordning.

Endelig henviser Databeskyttelsesrådet til sine retningslinjer for behandling af personoplysninger ved hjælp af videoanordninger og udmelder, at der om kort tid vil blive iværksat en undersøgelse af retshåndhævende myndigheders brug af teknologi til ansigtsgenkendelse.

Som svar på en skriftlig anmodning fra Den Europæiske Unions Agentur for Cybersikkerhed (ENISA) om, at Databeskyttelsesrådet udpeger en repræsentant til ENISA-Rådgivningsgruppen, udnævnte bestyrelsen Gwendal Le Grand, vicegeneralsekretær i CNIL, til repræsentant. Rådgivningsgruppen bistår ENISA's administrerende direktør med at udarbejde et årligt arbejdsprogram og sikre kommunikation med de relevante interessenter.

Databeskyttelsesrådet vedtog et svar på et åbent brev fra NOYB om samarbejde mellem tilsynsmyndighederne og omkring sammenhængsprocedurerne. I sit brev anfører Databeskyttelsesrådet, at det har arbejdet vedvarende på at forbedre såvel samarbejdet tilsynsmyndighederne imellem som sammenhængsprocedurerne. Databeskyttelsesrådet er klar over, at der er problemer, der kræver en indsats, bl.a. forskellene i national retspleje og praksis samt den tid og de ressourcer, der kræves for at afvikle grænseoverskridende sager. Databeskyttelsesrådet gentager, at det er fast besluttet på at finde løsninger, når disse ligger inden for dets kompetence.

Bemærkning til redaktører:
Bemærk, at alle dokumenter, der vedtages på Databeskyttelsesrådets plenarmøde, undergår de nødvendige kontroller af juridisk, sproglig og formateringsmæssig art og gøres tilgængelige på Databeskyttelsesrådets websted, når disse er afsluttet.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_10

03 June 2020

Bruxelles, den 3. juni — På det 30. plenarmøde i Bruxelles vedtog Det Europæiske Databeskyttelsesråd en udtalelse om registreredes rettigheder i forbindelse med undtagelsestilstanden i visse medlemsstater. Udvalget vedtog også en skrivelse som svar på et brev fra Civil Liberties Union for Europe, Access Now og Ungarns forening for borgerlige rettigheder (HCLU) vedrørende den ungarske regerings dekret nr. 179/2020 af 4. maj.

Det Europæiske Databeskyttelsesråd minder om, at selv i disse usædvanlige tider skal de nødforanstaltninger, der gennemføres, stadig sikre beskyttelsen af personoplysninger og dermed bidrage til at sikre respekten for de centrale værdier, demokrati, retsstat og grundlæggende rettigheder, som Unionen bygger på.

Både i udtalelsen og skrivelsen gentager Databeskyttelsesrådet, at den generelle forordning om databeskyttelse fortsat finder anvendelse og gør det muligt at reagere effektivt på pandemien, samtidig med at de grundlæggende rettigheder og friheder beskyttes. Databeskyttelseslovgivningen muliggør allerede databehandling, som er nødvendig for at bidrage til bekæmpelsen af covid-19-pandemien.

I udtalelsen fremhæves hovedprincipperne for begrænsninger af registreredes rettigheder i forbindelse med den undtagelsestilstand, der hersker i visse medlemsstater:

  • Begrænsninger, der er af en så generel, omfattende eller indgribende karakter, at en grundlæggende rettighed mister sit væsentlige indhold, kan ikke begrundes.
  • Under særlige omstændigheder giver artikel 23 i den generelle forordning om databeskyttelse de nationale lovgivere mulighed for gennem en lovgivningsmæssig foranstaltning at begrænse rækkevidden af dataansvarliges og databehandleres forpligtelser og registreredes rettigheder, når en sådan begrænsning respekterer det væsentligste indhold af de grundlæggende rettigheder og frihedsrettigheder og er en nødvendig og forholdsmæssig foranstaltning i et demokratisk samfund for at sikre vigtige mål af almen interesse i Unionen eller en medlemsstat, herunder navnlig folkesundheden.
  • Registreredes rettigheder udgør kernen i den grundlæggende ret til databeskyttelse, og når man læser og fortolker artikel 23 i den generelle forordning om databeskyttelse, bør man have for øje, at de som generel regel skal respekteres. Da begrænsninger er undtagelser fra den generelle regel, bør de kun anvendes i særlige tilfælde.
  • Begrænsninger skal være fastsat ved lov, og begrænsningerne bør være tilstrækkeligt klare til, at borgerne kan forstå, på hvilke betingelser registeransvarlige er bemyndiget til at anvende dem. Desuden skal begrænsninger være forudsigelige for de personer, der er omfattet af dem. Begrænsninger, der indføres for en periode, der ikke er nøje tidsbegrænset, og som anvendes med tilbagevirkende kraft, eller er underlagt ikke nærmere definerede betingelser, opfylder ikke kriteriet om forudsigelighed.
  • Alene det forhold, at der er tale om en pandemi eller en anden nødsituation er ikke tilstrækkelig til at retfærdiggøre nogen form for begrænsning af de registreredes rettigheder. Enhver begrænsning skal derimod klart bidrage til at beskytte et vigtigt mål af almen interesse for EU eller en medlemsstat.
  • Den undtagelsestilstand, der vedtages i forbindelse med en pandemi, er en retlig tilstand, der kan legitimere begrænsninger af registreredes rettigheder, forudsat at disse begrænsninger kun gælder, i det omfang det er strengt nødvendigt og forholdsmæssigt for at beskytte mål på folkesundhedsområdet. Begrænsningerne skal således være strengt begrænsede i omfang og tid, da den registreredes rettigheder kan begrænses, men ikke tilsidesættes. Desuden skal de garantier, der er fastsat i artikel 23, stk. 2, i den generelle forordning om databeskyttelse, finde fuld anvendelse.
  • Begrænsninger, der vedtages i forbindelse med en undtagelsestilstand, som ophæver eller udsætter udøvelsen af de registreredes rettigheder, og de forpligtelser, der påhviler registeransvarlige og registerførere, uden nogen klar tidsmæssig begrænsning, ville i praksis betyde en generel ophævelse af disse rettigheder og ikke være forenelig med kernen i de grundlæggende rettigheder og friheder.

Endvidere har Det Europæiske Databeskyttelsesråd meddelt, at det i løbet af de kommende måneder vil udstede retningslinjer for gennemførelsen af artikel 23 i den generelle forordning om databeskyttelse.

Bemærkning til redaktører:

Bemærk, at alle dokumenter, der vedtages på Databeskyttelsesrådets plenarmøde, undergår de nødvendige kontroller af juridisk, sproglig og formateringsmæssig art og gøres tilgængelige på Databeskyttelsesrådets websted, når disse er afsluttet.

20 May 2020

Bruxelles, den 20. maj —På det 28. plenarmøde i Det Europæiske Databeskyttelsesråd i Bruxelles vedtog Databeskyttelsesrådet en udtalelse i henhold til artikel 64 i den generelle forordning om databeskyttelse om det udkast til standardkontraktbestemmelser, som den slovenske tilsynsmyndighed (SA) har forelagt, og besluttede at offentliggøre en liste, der indeholder afgørelser i henhold til one-stop shop-mekanismen.

Databeskyttelsesrådet vedtog sin udtalelse om udkastet til standardkontraktbestemmelser for aftaler mellem dataansvarlige og databehandlere, som den slovenske tilsynsmyndighed har forelagt Databeskyttelsesrådet. Udtalelsen har til formål at sikre en konsekvent anvendelse af artikel 28 i den generelle forordning om databeskyttelse, som pålægger dataansvarlige og databehandlere at oprette en kontrakt eller et andet retligt dokument, der fastsætter parternes respektive forpligtelser. I henhold til artikel 28, stk. 6, i den generelle forordning om databeskyttelse kan disse kontrakter eller retlige dokumenter helt eller delvis baseres på standardkontraktbestemmelser, der er vedtaget af en tilsynsmyndighed. I udtalelsen fremsætter Databeskyttelsesrådet flere henstillinger, som der skal tages hensyn til, for at disse udkast til standardkontraktbestemmelser kan betragtes som standardkontraktbestemmelser. Hvis alle henstillinger gennemføres, vil den slovenske tilsynsmyndighed kunne vedtage dette udkast til aftale som standardkontraktbestemmelser i henhold til artikel 28, stk. 8, i den generelle forordning om databeskyttelse.

Det Europæiske Databeskyttelsesråd vil på sit websted offentliggøre en liste over afgørelser truffet af de nationale tilsynsmyndigheder i henhold til samarbejdet inden for rammerne af one-stop shop-mekanismen (artikel 60 i den generelle forordning om databeskyttelse).

I henhold til den generelle forordning om databeskyttelse har tilsynsmyndighederne pligt til at samarbejde om sager med en grænseoverskridende komponent for at sikre en ensartet anvendelse af forordningen. Det sker inden for rammerne af den såkaldte one-stop shop-mekanisme. I henhold til one-stop shop-mekanismen er den ledende tilsynsmyndighed ansvarlig for at udarbejde udkast til afgørelser og samarbejder med de berørte tilsynsmyndigheder for at nå til enighed. Indtil udgangen af april 2020 havde de ledende tilsynsmyndigheder vedtaget 103 endelige afgørelser inden for rammerne af one-stop shop-mekanismen. Det Europæiske Databeskyttelsesråd har til hensigt at offentliggøre sammendrag på engelsk, som Det Europæiske Databeskyttelsesråds sekretariat har udarbejdet. Oplysningerne vil blive offentliggjort, efter at de er godkendt af de ledende tilsynsmyndigheder og i overensstemmelse med de betingelser, der er fastsat i den nationale lovgivning.

Bemærkning til redaktører:

Bemærk, at alle dokumenter, der vedtages på Databeskyttelsesrådets plenarmøde, undergår de nødvendige kontroller af juridisk, sproglig og formateringsmæssig art og gøres tilgængelige på Databeskyttelsesrådets websted, når disse er afsluttet.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_08

08 May 2020

During its 26th plenary session, the EDPB adopted a letter in response to requests from MEPs Metsola and Halicki regarding the Polish presidential elections taking place via postal vote. Additionally, an exchange of information took place on the recent Hungarian government decrees in relation to the coronavirus during the state of emergency
 
In its response to the MEPs Metsola and Halicki, the EDPB indicates that it is aware that data of Polish citizens was sent from the national PESEL (personal identification) database to the Polish Post by one of the Polish ministries and acknowledges that this issue requires special attention.

The Board underlines that, according to the GDPR, personal data, such as names and addresses, and national identification numbers (such as the Polish PESEL ID), must be processed lawfully, fairly and in a transparent manner, for specified purposes only. Public authorities may disclose information on individuals included in electoral lists, but only when this is specifically authorised by Member State law. The EDPB underlined that the disclosure of personal data – from one entity to another – always requires a legal basis in accordance with EU data protection laws. As previously indicated in the EDPB statement on the use of personal data in political campaigns (2/2019), political parties and candidates - but also public authorities, particularly those responsible for public registers - must stand ready to demonstrate how they have complied with data protection principles. The EDPB also underlined that, where elections are conducted by the collection of postal votes, it is the responsibility of the state to ensure that specific safeguards are in place to maintain the secrecy and integrity of the personal data concerning political opinions.

EDPB Chair, Andrea Jelinek, added: “Elections form the cornerstone of every democratic society. That is why the EDPB has always dedicated special attention to the processing of personal data for election purposes. We encourage data controllers, especially public authorities, to lead by example and process personal data in a manner which is transparent and leaves no doubt regarding the legal basis for the processing operations, including disclosure of data.”

However, the EDPB stresses that enforcement of the GDPR lies with the national supervisory authorities. The EDPB is not a data protection supervisory authority in its own right and, as such, does not have the same competences, tasks and powers as the national supervisory authorities. In the first instance, the assessment of alleged GDPR infringements falls within the competence of the responsible and independent national supervisory authority. Nevertheless, the EDPB will continue to pay special attention to the developments of personal data processing in connection to democratic elections and remains ready to support all members of the Board, including the Polish Supervisory Authority, in such matters.

During the plenary, the Hungarian Supervisory Authority provided the Board with information on the legislative measures the Hungarian government has adopted in relation to the coronavirus during the state of emergency. The Board considers that further explanation is necessary and has thus requested that the Hungarian Supervisory Authority provides further information on the scope and the duration, as well as the Hungarian Supervisory Authority’s opinion on the necessity and proportionality of these measures. The Board will discuss this further during its plenary session next Tuesday.

The agenda of the 26th plenary is available here

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_07

24 April 2020

During its 24th plenary session, the EDPB adopted three letters, reinforcing several elements from its earlier guidance on data protection in the context of fighting the COVID-19 outbreak.

In reply to a letter from the United States Mission to the European Union, the EDPB looks into transfers of health data for research purposes, enabling international cooperation for the development of a vaccine. The US Mission enquired into the possibility of relying on a derogation of Art. 49 GDPR to enable international flows.

The EDPB tackled this topic in detail in its recently adopted guidelines (03/2020) on the processing of health data for scientific research. In its letter, the EDPB reiterates that the GDPR allows for collaboration between EEA and non-EEA scientists in the search for vaccines and treatments against COVID-19, while simultaneously protecting fundamental data protection rights in the EEA.

When data are transferred outside of the EEA, solutions that guarantee the continuous protection of data subjects’ fundamental rights, such as adequacy decisions or appropriate safeguards (included in Article 46 GDPR) should be favoured, according to the EDPB.  

However, the EDPB considers that the fight against COVID-19 has been recognised by the EU and Member States as an important public interest, as it has caused an exceptional sanitary crisis of an unprecedented nature and scale. This may require urgent action in the field of scientific research, necessitating transfers of personal data to third countries or international organisations.
 
In the absence of an adequacy decision or appropriate safeguards, public authorities and private entities may also rely upon derogations included in Article 49 GDPR

Andrea Jelinek, the Chair of the EDPB, said: “The global scientific community is racing against the clock to develop a COVID-19 vaccine or treatment. The EDPB confirms that the GDPR offers tools giving the best guarantees for international transfers of health data and is flexible enough to offer faster temporary solutions in the face of the urgent medical situation.”

The EDPB also adopted a response to a request from MEPs Lucia Ďuriš Nicholsonová and Eugen Jurzyca.

The EDPB replies that data protection laws already take into account data processing operations necessary to contribute to fighting an epidemic, therefore - according to the EDPB - there is no reason to lift GDPR provisions, but to observe them. In addition, the EDPB refers to the guidelines on the issues of geolocation and other tracing tools, as well as the processing of health data for research purposes in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the EDPB, added: “The GDPR is designed to be flexible. As a result, it can enable an efficient response to support the fight against the pandemic, while at the same time protecting fundamental human rights and freedoms. When the processing of personal data is necessary in the context of COVID-19, data protection is indispensable to build trust, to create the conditions for social acceptability of any possible solution and, therefore, to guarantee the effectiveness of these measures”.

The EDPB received two letters from Sophie In 't Veld MEP, raising a series of questions regarding the latest technologies that are being developed in order to fight the spread of COVID-19.

In its reply, the EDPB refers to its recently adopted guidelines (04/2020) on the use of location data and contact tracing apps, which highlight – among other elements - that such schemes should have a voluntary nature, use the least amount of data possible, and should not trace individual movements, but rather use proximity information of users.

The agenda of the 23rd plenary is available here

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_06

21 April 2020

During its 23rd plenary session, the EDPB adopted guidelines on the processing of health data for research purposes in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak and guidelines on geolocation and other tracing tools in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak.

The  guidelines on the processing of health data for research purposes in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak aim to shed light on the most urgent legal questions concerning the use of health data, such as the legal basis of processing, further processing of health data for the purpose of scientific research, the implementation of adequate safeguards and the exercise of data subject rights.

The guidelines state that the GDPR contains several provisions for the processing of health data for the purpose of scientific research, which also apply in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, in particular relating to consent and to the respective national legislations. The GDPR foresees the possibility to process certain special categories of personal data, such as health data, where it is necessary for scientific research purposes.

In addition, the guidelines address legal questions concerning international data transfers involving health data for research purposes related to the fight against COVID-19, in particular in the absence of an adequacy decision or other appropriate safeguards.  

Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the EDPB, said: “Currently, great research efforts are being made in the fight against COVID-19. Researchers hope to produce results as quickly as possible. The GDPR does not stand in the way of scientific research, but enables the lawful processing of health data to support the purpose of finding a vaccine or treatment for COVID-19”.

The guidelines on geolocation and other tracing tools in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak aim to clarify the conditions and principles for the proportionate use of location data and contact tracing tools, for two specific purposes:
1.    using location data to support the response to the pandemic by modelling the spread of the virus in order to assess the overall effectiveness of confinement measures;
2.    using contact tracing, which aims to notify individuals who may have been in close proximity to someone who is eventually confirmed as a carrier of the virus, in order to break the contamination chains as early as possible.

The guidelines emphasise that both the GDPR and the ePrivacy Directive contain specific provisions allowing for the use of anonymous or personal data to support public authorities and other actors at both national and EU level in their efforts to monitor and contain the spread of COVID-19. The general principles of effectiveness, necessity, and proportionality must guide any measures adopted by Member States or EU institutions that involve processing of personal data to fight COVID-19.

The EDPB stands by and underlines the position expressed in its letter to the European Commission (14 April) that the use of contact tracing apps should be voluntary and should not rely on tracing individual movements, but rather on proximity information regarding users.

Dr. Jelinek added: “Apps can never replace nurses and doctors. While data and technology can be important tools, we need to keep in mind that they have intrinsic limitations. Apps can only complement the effectiveness of public health measures and the dedication of healthcare workers that is necessary to fight COVID-19. At any rate, people should not have to choose between an efficient response to the crisis and the protection of fundamental rights.”

In addition, the EDPB adopted a guide for contact tracing apps as an annex to the guidelines. The purpose of this guide, which is non-exhaustive, is to provide general guidance to designers and implementers of contact tracing apps, underlining that any assessment must be carried out on a case-by-case basis.

Both sets of guidelines will exceptionally not be submitted for public consultation due to the urgency of the current situation and the necessity to have the guidelines readily available.

The agenda of the 23rd plenary is available here

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_05

17 April 2020

On April 17th, the EDPB held its 22nd Plenary Session. For further information, please consult the agenda:

Agenda of Twenty-second Plenary

14 April 2020

Following a request for consultation from the European Commission, the European Data Protection Board adopted a letter concerning the European Commission's draft Guidance on apps supporting the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic. This Guidance on data protection and privacy implications complements the European Commission’s Recommendation on apps for contact tracing, published on 8 April and setting out the process towards a common EU toolbox for the use of technology and data to combat and exit from the COVID-19 crisis.
 
Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the EDPB, said: “The EDPB welcomes the Commission’s initiative to develop a pan-European and coordinated approach as this will help to ensure the same level of data protection for every European citizen, regardless of where he or she lives.”
 
In its letter, the EDPB specifically addresses the use of apps for the contact tracing and warning functionality, because this is where increased attention must be paid in order to minimise interferences with private life while still allowing data processing with the goal of preserving public health.
 
The EDPB considers that the development of the apps should be made in an accountable way, documenting with a data protection impact assessment all the implemented privacy by design and privacy by default mechanisms. In addition, the source code should be made publicly available for the widest possible scrutiny by the scientific community.
 
The EDPB strongly supports the Commission’s proposal for a voluntary adoption of such apps, a choice that should be made by individuals as a token of collective responsibility.
 
Finally, the EDPB underlined the need for the Board and its Members, in charge of advising and ensuring the correct application of the GDPR and the E-Privacy Directive, to be fully involved in the whole process of elaboration and implementation of these measures. The EDPB recalls that it intends to publish Guidelines in the upcoming days on geolocation and tracing tools in the context of the COVID-19 out-break.

The EDPB’s letter is available here: https://edpb.europa.eu/letters_en
 
The agenda of the 21th plenary session is available here: https://edpb.europa.eu/our-work-tools/agenda/2020_en#agenda_490

EDPB_Press Release_2020_04

07 April 2020

During its 20th plenary session on April 7th, the European Data Protection Board assigned concrete mandates to its expert subgroups to develop guidance on several aspects of data processing in the fight against COVID-19. This follows the decision made on April 3rd during the EDPB's 19th plenary session.

1.    geolocation and other tracing tools in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak – a mandate was given to the technology expert subgroup for leading this work;
2.    processing of health data for research purposes in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak – a mandate was given to the compliance, e-government and health expert subgroup for leading this work.

Considering the high priority of these 2 topics, the EDPB decided to postpone the guidance work on teleworking tools and practices in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak, for the time being.

Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the EDPB, said: “The EDPB will move swiftly to issue guidance on these topics within the shortest possible notice to help make sure that technology is used in a responsible way to support and hopefully win the battle against the corona pandemic. I strongly believe data protection and public health go hand in hand."

The agenda of the 20th plenary session is available here

EDPB_Press Release_2020_03

03 April 2020

The European Data Protection Board is speeding up its guidance work in response to the COVID-19 crisis. Its monthly plenary meetings are being replaced by weekly remote meetings with the Members of the Board.
 
Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the EDPB, said: "The Board will prioritise providing guidance on the following issues: use of location data and anonymisation of data; processing of health data for scientific and research purposes and the processing of data by technologies used to enable remote working. The EDPB will adopt a horizontal approach and plans to issue general guidance with regard to the appropriate legal bases and applicable legal principles."


The agenda of today's remote meeting is available here

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2020_03

23 March 2020

Following a decision by the EDPB Chair, the EDPB April Plenary Session has been cancelled due to safety concerns surrounding the outbreak of the Coronavirus (COVID-19). The EDPB hereby follows the example of other EU institutions, such as the European Parliament, which have restricted the number of large-scale meetings.

The April Plenary Session was scheduled to take place on 20 and 21 April. Earlier, the EDPB March Plenary was also cancelled for the same reasons. You can find an overview of upcoming EDPB Plenary Meetings here

20 March 2020

On March 19th, the European Data Protection Board adopted a formal statement on the processing of personal data in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak via written procedure. The full statement is available here

 

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2020_02

16 March 2020

Governments, public and private organisations throughout Europe are taking measures to contain and mitigate COVID-19. This can involve the processing of different types of personal data.  

Andrea Jelinek, Chair of the European Data Protection Board (EDPB), said: “Data protection rules (such as GDPR) do not hinder measures taken in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic. However, I would like to underline that, even in these exceptional times, the data controller must ensure the protection of the personal data of the data subjects. Therefore, a number of considerations should be taken into account to guarantee the lawful processing of personal data.”

The GDPR is a broad legislation and also provides for the rules to apply to the processing of personal data in a context such as the one relating to COVID-19. Indeed, the GDPR provides for the legal grounds to enable the employers and the competent public health authorities to process personal data in the context of epidemics, without the need to obtain the consent of the data subject. This applies for instance when the processing of personal data is necessary for the employers for reasons of public interest in the area of public health or to protect vital interests (Art. 6 and 9 of the GDPR) or to comply with another legal obligation.

For the processing of electronic communication data, such as mobile location data, additional rules apply. The national laws implementing the ePrivacy Directive provide for the principle that the location data can only be used by the operator when they are made anonymous, or with the consent of the individuals. The public authorities should first aim for the processing of location data in an anonymous way (i.e. processing data aggregated in a way that it cannot be reversed to personal data). This could enable to generate reports on the concentration of mobile devices at a certain location (“cartography”).  

When it is not possible to only process anonymous data, Art. 15 of the ePrivacy Directive enables the member states to introduce legislative measures pursuing national security and public security *. This emergency legislation is possible under the condition that it constitutes a necessary, appropriate and proportionate measure within a democratic society. If such measures are introduced, a Member State is obliged to put in place adequate safeguards, such as granting individuals the right to judicial remedy.

Update:

On March 19th, the European Data Protection Board adopted a formal statement on the processing of personal data in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak. The full statement is available below.

* In this context, it shall be noted that safeguarding public health may fall under the national and/or public security exception.

EDPB_Press Release_statement_2020_01

10 March 2020

Following a decision by the EDPB Chair, the EDPB March Plenary Session has been cancelled due to safety concerns surrounding the outbreak of the Coronavirus (COVID-19). The EDPB hereby follows the example of other EU institutions, such as the European Parliament, which have restricted the number of large-scale meetings.

The March Plenary Session was scheduled to take place on 19 and 20 March. You can find an overview of upcoming EDPB Plenary Meetings here

20 February 2020

On February 18th and 19th, the EEA Supervisory Authorities and the European Data Protection Supervisor, assembled in the European Data Protection Board, met for their eighteenth plenary session. During the plenary, a wide range of topics was discussed.
 
The EDPB and the individual EEA Supervisory Authorities (SAs) contributed to the evaluation and review of the GDPR as required by Art. 97 GDPR. The EDPB is of the opinion that the application of the GDPR in the first 20 months has been successful. Although the need for sufficient resources for all SAs is still a concern and some challenges remain, resulting, for example, from the patchwork of national procedures, the Board is convinced that the cooperation between SAs will result in a common data protection culture and consistent practice. The EDPB is examining possible solutions to overcome these challenges and to improve existing cooperation procedures. It also calls upon the European Commission to check if national procedures impact the effectiveness of the cooperation procedures and considers that, eventually, legislators may also have a role to play in ensuring further harmonisation. In its assessment, the EDPB also addresses issues such as international transfer tools, impact on SMEs, SA resources and development of new technologies. The EDPB concludes that it is premature to revise the GDPR at this point in time.

The EDPB adopted draft guidelines to provide further clarification regarding the application of Articles 46.2 (a) and 46.3 (b) of the GDPR. These articles address transfers of personal data from EEA public authorities or bodies to public bodies in third countries or to international organisations, where these transfers are not covered by an adequacy decision. The guidelines recommend which safeguards to implement in legally binding instruments (art. 46.2 (a)) or in administrative arrangements (Art. 46.3 (b)) to ensure that the level of protection of natural persons under the GDPR is met and not undermined. The guidelines will be submitted for public consultation.

Statement on privacy implications of mergers
Following the announcement of Google LLC’s intention to acquire Fitbit, the EDPB adopted a statement highlighting that the possible further combination and accumulation of sensitive personal data regarding people in Europe by a major tech company could entail a high level of risk to privacy and data protection. The EDPB reminds the parties to the proposed merger of their obligations under the GDPR and to conduct a full assessment of the data protection requirements and privacy implications of the merger in a transparent way. The Board urges the parties to mitigate possible risks to the rights to privacy and data protection before notifying the merger to the European Commission. The EDPB will consider any implications for the protection of personal data in the EEA and stands ready to contribute its advice to the EC if so requested.

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_02

18 February 2020

On February 18th and 19th, the eighteenth plenary session of the European Data Protection Board is taking place in Brussels. For further information, please consult the agenda.

Agenda of Eighteenth Plenary

30 January 2020

On January 28th and 29th, the EEA Data Protection Authorities and the European Data Protection Supervisor, assembled in the European Data Protection Board, met for their seventeenth plenary session. During the plenary, a wide range of topics was discussed.
 
The EDPB adopted its opinions on the Accreditation Requirements for Codes of Conduct Monitoring Bodies submitted to the Board by the Belgian, Spanish and French supervisory authorities (SAs). These opinions aim to ensure consistency and the correct application of the criteria among EEA SAs.

The EDPB adopted draft Guidelines on Connected Vehicles. As vehicles become increasingly more connected, the amount of data generated about drivers and passengers by these connected vehicles is growing rapidly. The EDPB guidelines focus on the processing of personal data in relation to the non-professional use of connected vehicles by data subjects. More specifically, the guidelines deal with the personal data processed by the vehicle and the data communicated by the vehicle as a connected device. The guidelines will be submitted for public consultation.

The Board adopted the final version of the Guidelines on the processing of Personal Data through Video Devices following public consultation. The guidelines aim to clarify how the GDPR applies to the processing of personal data when using video devices and to ensure the consistent application of the GDPR in this regard. The guidelines cover both traditional video devices and smart video devices. The guidelines address, among others, the lawfulness of processing, including the processing of special categories of data, the applicability of the household exemption and the disclosure of footage to third parties. Following public consultation, several amendments were made.

The EDPB adopted its opinions on the draft accreditation requirements for Certification Bodies submitted to the Board by the UK and Luxembourg SAs. These are the first opinions on accreditation requirements for Certification Bodies adopted by the Board. They aim to establish a consistent and harmonised approach regarding the requirements which SAs and national accreditation bodies will apply when accrediting certification bodies. 

The EDPB adopted its opinion on the draft decision regarding the Fujikura Automotive Europe Group’s Controller Binding Corporate Rules (BCRs), submitted to the Board by the Spanish Supervisory Authority.

Letter on unfair algorithms
The EDPB adopted a letter in response to MEP Sophie in’t Veld’s request concerning the use of unfair algorithms. The letter provides an analysis of the challenges posed by the use of algorithms, an overview of the relevant GDPR provisions and existing guidelines addressing these issues, and describes the work already undertaken by SAs.

Letter to the Council of Europe on the Cybercrime Convention
Following the Board’s contribution to the consultation process on the negotiation of a second additional protocol to the Council of Europe Convention on Cybercrime (Budapest Convention), several EDPB Members actively participated in the Council of Europe Cybercrime Committee’s (T-CY) Octopus Conference. The Board adopted a follow-up letter to the conference, stressing the need to integrate strong data protection safeguards into the future Additional Protocol to the Convention and to ensure its consistency with Convention 108, as well as with the EU Treaties and Charter of Fundamental Rights.

Note to editors:
Please note that all documents adopted during the EDPB Plenary are subject to the necessary legal, linguistic and formatting checks and will be made available on the EDPB website once these have been completed.

EDPB_Press Release_2020_01

28 January 2020

On January 28th and 29th, the seventeenth plenary session of the European Data Protection Board is taking place in Brussels. For further information, please consult the agenda.

Agenda of Seventeenth Plenary